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Based on Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary
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backbench, backbencher
Chiefly British
the rear benches in the House of Commons where junior members of Parliament sit behind government officeholders and their counterparts in the opposition party; new members of the US Congress considered as a group

Bahamas.(*)


Balfour Report, November 18, 1926
the conclusions of an Imperial Conference committee under the chairmanship of Lord Balfour, a British Cabinet minister and former prime minister, on relations between the self-governing parts of the empire. This was a pivotal document in Canada's development toward a true nation (so you see, we still had not confederated this many years after 1867).
    The report declared that Britain and the Dominions of Canada, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand and the Irish Free State were "autonomous Communities within the British Empire, equal in status, in no way subordinate one to another in any aspect of their domestic or external affairs, though united by a common allegiance to the Crown, and freely associated as members of the British Commonwealth of Nations." The report led directly to the British Act called the Statute of Westminster; the Act which legally recognizes the terms recommended in the 1926 Balfour Report.

bamboozle, bamboozled, bamboozling, bamboozles, bamboozlement
to take in by elaborate methods of deceit; hoodwink; deceive

behold, beheld, beholding, beholds, beholder
calling attention to; to look upon; gaze at

Richard Bedford Bennett(11th prime minister of Canada 1930-1935)
former hot-headed lawyer, his achievements as prime minister have attracted less notice than his mistakes.comprised with Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

bias, biased, biassing, biases
marked by or exhibiting bias; prejudiced: gave a biased account of the trial; a preference or an inclination, especially one that inhibits impartial judgment; an unfair act or policy stemming from prejudice; to influence in a particular, typically unfair direction; prejudice

the first ten amendments to the Constitution of the United States. The Bill of Rights establishes basic American civil liberties that the government cannot violate.

A bill is a draft of a proposed law presented for approval to a legislative body. compare Act

The states ratified the Bill of Rights in 1791, three years after the Constitution was ratified. Originally the Bill of Rights applied only to the federal government, but in a series of 20th century cases, the Supreme Court decided that most of its provisions apply to the states. Many countries have used the Bill of Rights as a model for defining civil liberties in their constitutions.

The Bill of Rights includes a wide range of protections with a common theme and purpose, that of to define the scope of individual freedom in the United States of America and to make the political system more democratic..Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved

boondoggle, boondoggler, boondoggled, boondoggling, boondoggles
unnecessary, wasteful and often counterproductive work; to waste time or money on unnecessary and often counterproductive work

borough, boroughs
Chiefly British
a town having a municipal corporation and certain rights, such as self government; a town that sends a representative to Parliament

Bright, John.(1811-89)
British Parliament member in 1843 for Birmingham, England.his comment.on Britain flashing by Nova Scotia's concerns

Britain/Great Britain
the island of Great Britain during pre Roman, Roman and early Anglo-Saxon times before the reign of Alfred the Great (871-899); name is derived from Brittania, which the Romans used for the portion of the island that they occupied; acts of union joined England with Wales in 1536, with Scotland in 1707 to create the political entity of Great Britain
compare England, United Kingdom

Britain's 13 American Colonies before 1763, circa 1750


British Empire(early 20th century)
The British Empire, established over the course of three centuries, began in the late 16th century with chartered commercial ventures in sugar and tobacco plantations, slave trading, and missionary activities in North America and the Caribbean Islands. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the British Empire reached the height of its power, ruling over large parts of Africa, Asia, and North America.
"British Empire, Early 20th Century," Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

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