.
.
Based on Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary
Use the BACK button on your browser to return

Canada Gazette
Ontario's first newspaper, the Upper Canada Gazette, was an official government publication appearing in 1793. All official commissions are still proclaimed in the 'Gazette'.

cede, ceded, ceding, cedes
to surrender possession of, especially by treaty; relinquish; to yield; grant

cessation
a bringing or coming to an end; halt; stop; a ceasing (a cessation of hostilities); cease

Charlottetown Accord
agreement between the federal government of Canada, the provincial and territorial governments, and representatives of Canada's indigenous peoples on a proposed reform of Trudeaus' non-Canadian.so-called.'constitution' of 1982. The agreement dealt with issues concerning the status of the province of Québec, the self government of indigenous peoples and the structure of Canada's Parliament. It was signed on August 28, 1992, at Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island and was rejected by a majority of voters in a referendum, October 26, 1992.

The driving force behind the Charlottetown Accord was the fact that the so-called constitution of 1982 was not ratified by the legislature of Québec, where French is the principal language and French culture is dominant. Many citizens of Québec felt that what was referred to as the constitution, did not adequately consider the cultural differences between Québec and the rest of Canada. A 1987 effort to address this issue had resulted in the.Meech Lake Accord, which recognized Québec's special status (her uniqueness {mostly french speaking}) and granted reforms that Québec leaders had requested. However, despite support by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and many provincial leaders, the Meech Lake Accord was not ratified by all provincial legislatures in the span of three years, as required by rules. In addition, the 'special status' for Quebec apart from other Provinces was struck down by the Supreme Court as invalid..comprised from Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

charter, chartered, chartering, charters, charterer
a written grant from the sovereign power of a country conferring certain rights and privileges on a person, a corporation, or the people (example, a royal charter was granted by Queen Elizabeth to Sir Humphrey Gilbert in 1583 to colonize Newfoundland, the first colony of England in North America); a document issued by a sovereign, legislature, or other authority, creating a public or private corporation, such as a city, college, or bank and defining its privileges and purposes; a document outlining the principles, functions and organization of a corporate body; a constitution (the city charter); an authorization from a central organization to establish a local branch or chapter; special privilege or immunity; a contract for the commercial leasing of a vessel or space on a vessel; the hiring or leasing of an aircraft, a vessel, or other vehicle, especially for the exclusive, temporary use of a group of travelers; a written instrument given as evidence of agreement, transfer, or contract; a deed; to grant a charter to; establish by charter; to hire or lease by charter (charter an oil tanker); to hire (a bus or an airplane, for example) for the exclusive, temporary use of a group of travelers

circa,ca, c., C. 
in approximately; about (born circa 1900); era

collective
assembled or accumulated into a whole; of, relating to, characteristic of, or made by a number of people acting as a group (a collective decision); an undertaking, such as a business operation, set up on the principle of ownership and control of the means of production and distribution by the workers involved

compromise, compromise, compromised, compromising, compromises, compromiser
a settlement of differences in which each side makes concessions; the result of such a settlement; something that combines qualities or elements of different things (the incongruous design is a compromise between high tech and early American); to settle by concessions; to expose or make liable to danger, suspicion or disrepute (an embassy that was compromised by hidden listening devices); to make a compromise; to promise mutually

con1
in opposition or disagreement; against (debated the issue pro and con)
con
an argument or opinion against something; one that holds an opposing opinion or view

con2, conned, conning, cons, conner
to study, peruse, or examine carefully; to learn or commit to memory

con3
conned, conning, cons
to direct the steering or course of (a vessel); the station or post of the person who steers a vessel; the act or process of steering a vessel

con4
conned, conning, cons
to swindle (a victim) by first winning his or her confidence; dupe

con.(con job)
of, relating to, or involving a swindle or a fraud (a con artist,.a con job); short for confidence; a swindle

con5
a convict

concede
to yield as in argument; admit the truth of; acknowledge; grant a concession
concession, concessive, concessionar
a conceding; granting; giving in; yielding (a privilege granted)

concoct, concocted, concocting, concocts, concocter.or.concoctor,
concoction, concoctive
devise, fabricate; to prepare by combining raw materials, mixing ingredients; to devise, using skill and intelligence; to prepare by as in cooking

confer, conferred, conferring, confers, conferrable, conferment, conferral, conferrer
to apply use; bestow, an honor, for example (conferred a medal on the hero; conferred an honorary degree on her); to invest with a characteristic (a carefully worded statement that conferred an aura of credibility onto the administration's actions); to meet in order to deliberate together or compare views

congress, congressional, congressionally
the national legislative body of the United States, consisting of the Senate and the House of Representatives; the two year session of this legislature between elections of the House of Representatives; the national legislative body of a nation, especially a republic; a formal assembly of representatives, as of various nations, to discuss problems; the act of coming together or meeting; a single meeting, as of a political party or other group; sexual intercourse

connote, connoted, connoting
to imply as a logical connotation; to be associated with or inseparable from as a consequence or concomitant (the remorse so often connoted by guilt); to convey in addition to exact explicit meaning (all the misery that poverty connotes)

connotation, connotational
the suggesting of a meaning by a word apart from the thing it explicitly names or describes; something suggested by a word or thing; implication (the connotations of comfort that surrounded that old chair); denotation

consensus
an opinion or position reached by a group as a whole (the will of the people {the voters' consensus was that the measure should be adopted}); general agreement or accord (government by consensus)

constituency, constituencies
the body of voters represented by an elected legislator or official; the district so represented; the residents of an electoral district

constituent, constituently
a resident of a district represented by an elected official (the electorate or voting populace); authorized to make or amend a constitution (a constituent assembly); necessary in the formation of the whole; component (a constituent element–empowered to elect or designate) serving as part of a whole; one that authorizes another to act as a representative; a constituent part; a component; element

constitute, constituted, constituting, constitutes
constituter.or.constitutor, constitution
to set up or establish according to law or provision (a body that is duly constituted under the charter); to set up; establish; form; compose; to form of elements, material, etc.; to be the elements or parts of; compose (correct grammar and sentence structure do not in themselves constitute good writing); to amount to; equal (an infraction that constitutes a punishable offense); to found (an institution, for example); to enact (a law or regulation); to appoint to an office, dignity, function, or task; designate
Political:.the system of fundamental laws and principles that is.formulated by those who will be affected by it, prescribing the nature, functions and limits of a government.or another institution; the document on which such a system is transmitted (such as the Constitution of the United States of America, or for other examples);
the physical makeup of the individual comprising inherited qualities (born with a strong constitution); the act or process of composing, setting up, or establishing; the composition or structure of something; makeup

constitutional, constitutional, constitutionally
of or relating to a legal constitution (a constitutional amendment) consistent with, sanctioned by, or permissible according to a legal constitution (the legal right of free speech established in the constitution of the US); established by or operating under a constitution (a constitutional government); inherent; of or relating to one's physical makeup

Constitution of the United States of America.(pic of US)
A system of fundamental laws of the United States of America, correctly set under the Articles of Confederation, but switched to be against the men and women of the country in what is now called the Constitution.

The first ten amendments of the Constitution were called the Bill of Rights. It is.based upon.the Articles of Confederation, which was the first constitution of the United States.

The U.S. Constitution.provides for a federal system, by the individual states having granted to the federal government certain powers for the exercise of the national government, retaining severally the right of Eminent Domain over the lands within the boundaries of their own individual states.

The United States of America in its constitution assured that no large state such as say California, would be able to use its massive population base (majority rule) to override concerns of say tiny Rhode Island. That was one good part..All.states have two senators and one governor. 

The Constitution (picture of is below) was drawn up by 55 delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia during the summer of 1787 and ratified by the states in 1788..The Constitution defines distinct powers for the Congress of the United States, the president, and the federal courts. This division of authority is known as a system of checks and balances, and it ensures that none of the branches of government can dominate the others. The Constitution also establishes and limits the authority of the federal government over the states and spells out freedoms and liberties for U.S. citizens...

Forces That Shaped The Constitution: In 1774 the Parliament of Great Britain capped a series of abuses against the American colonies by imposing a tax on tea imports to the colonies. The colonies quickly agreed to convene a Continental Congress, which in 1776 appointed two committees;.one to draft the Declaration of Independence and the other to prepare a "form of confederation" among the colonies. In 1778 this second committee produced the Articles of Confederation. They took effect in 1781 when Maryland, the last holdout state, ratified them.

The Articles of Confederation,.the first constitution of the United States, established a league of friendship among the states, but not a political union. It should have stayed that way..Each state remained separate and.sovereign.(under self rule). The central government consisted of a one chamber Congress, in which.each state had a single vote. Congress had few powers, lacking even the authority to impose taxes. Any congressional action required the approval of 9 of the 13 states. The government had no president and no central court. But those surreptitious individuals behind the creating of their document had other plans not to the benefit of the men and women of the nation.
    After numerous votes settled the details, a committee on style and revision was assigned in to put the final results in language to submit to the people for ratification.

Two political dignitaries had great influence on the creation of the Constitution..John Locke.(1632-1704), an important British political philosopher, had a large impact through his.Second Treatise of Government(1690). Locke argued.that.sovereignty.resides in individuals, not rulers. A political state, he described, comes forth from a social contract among the people, who consent to government in order to preserve their lives, liberties, and property. In the words of.the Declaration of Independence, which drew heavily on Locke,."governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed, and that a government's existence can only be justified by its ability to protect the human rights better than individuals could on their own".We the People

The framers of the U.S. Constitution put the Constitution above legislative power, indeed, above all governmental powers. The Constitution, particularly the Supremacy Clause of Article VI, establishes the "rule of law," the idea that the.government itself, including the president and Congress, must abide by the law the individual states agreed that they would follows.

The Constitution had to be.ratified.by nine states before it could take effect.

The Constitution spells outin six articles (sections) the powers of the federal government and the states.(the Constitution does not include the term separation of powers). The first three articles establish the separation mechanism and mark out areas of responsibility for each.branch.of government (Forestry, Health, etc.). The Constitution.prevents tyrannical abuses of authority.through the separation of powers, where, each branch of government has its own responsibilities and.cannot take action.in areas assigned to the other branches.

No member of Congress may serve simultaneously as a member of the executive branch..This separation.differs strikingly from the Canadian and British practice, in which the prime minister and other executive officials are.also.members of Parliament. comprised with Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
The complete United States Constitution is in Encarta.

contrive, contrived, contriving, contriver, contrived, contrivance, contrivable
devise, plan (contrive ways of handling the situation) to form or create in an artistic or ingenious manner (contrived household utensils from stone); to bring about; to devise, plan, invent (they have contrived an automatic dishwasher); to bring about by stratagem or with difficulty ; to make schemes; artificial, labored; that can be contrived

convene, convened, convening, convenes, convenable, convener.or.convenor
to come together usually for an official or public purpose; assemble formally; to cause to come together formally; convoke (convene a special session of Congress); call; to summon to appear

convention
a practice or procedure widely practiced, valid or invalid; a widely used device or technique; general acceptance of certain practices or attitudes (by convention, north is at the top of most maps); a formal meeting of members, representatives or delegates, as of a political party, fraternal society, profession or industry; the body of persons attending such an assembly (called the convention to order.); an agreement between states, sides or military forces, especially an international agreement dealing with a specific subject, such as the treatment of prisoners of war

Corporation Sole
another name for an English Sovereign, a name used under the feudal system for one who possessed title to all lands; his will is absolute; he wasthelaw; up till December 11, 1931, Canada was ruled by a Corporate Sole, a Governor General.(*)

corroborate, corroborated, corroborating, corroboration, corroborator, corroborative, corroboratory
to support with evidence or authority; make more certain; confirm

comprise, comprised, comprising, comprises
to include.especially within a particular.scope; to compose; to be made up of (a vast installation comprising fifty buildings; he comprised his life helping those in need); put together from; constitute.(what are the terms which constitute this agreement?)
comprisable

.
I n d e x  o f  s i t e
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
*
.