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Based on Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary
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deceive, deceived, deceiving, deceives
to cause to believe what is not true; delude; mislead; beguile; betray

deceptive, deceptiveness, deceivable, deceiver, deceivingly
tending to deceive; mislead

deceitful, deceitfully, deceitfulness
given to cheating or deceiving; deliberately misleading; deceptive; dishonest

deception
the use of deceit; the fact or state of being deceived; a ruse; a trick

deceit
the act or practice of deceiving; deception; a stratagem; a trick; the quality of being deceitful; falseness

declare, declared, declaring, declares, declarable, declarer
to make known formally or officially; announce; to state emphatically or authoritatively; affirm; to reveal or make manifest; show; to make a full statement of (dutiable goods, for example); in games, to designate (a trump suit or no trump) with the final bid of a hand in bridge; to make a declaration; to proclaim one's support, choice, opinion, or resolution; assert; to state one's intent; to make clear

declaration
an explicit, formal announcement, either oral or written; the act or process of declaring; a statement of taxable goods or of properties subject to duty
Law:.formal statement by a plaintiff specifying the facts and circumstances constituting his or her cause of action; an unsworn statement of facts that is admissible as evidence

Declaration of Independence
Declaration of Independence - United States of Americathe fundamental document establishing the United States for America as a nation, adopted on July 4, 1776.

This document was used by the 13 British North American colonies.to proclaim their independence from Great Britain, culminating in the Treaty of Paris. The Declaration of Independence was adopted in final form on July 4, 1776. It can be.divided into three parts: a statement of principle concerning the rights of man and the legitimacy of revolution, a list of specific grievances against England's King George III, and a formal claim of independence.
    On June 7, 1776, Richard Henry Lee, a representative from Virginia, proposed a resolution in the Continental Congress."that these united colonies are and of right ought to be free and independent States.".This measure sought to.end America's allegiance to the Crown and dissolve all political connection with Great Britain.
    Although the Continental Congress did not pass the resolution until July 2, it immediately appointed a committee to draft a formal statement of independence. The task of drafting the declaration fell to Thomas Jefferson, who was known for his powerful writing style.
    The document transformed the colonists' struggle with Great Britain from a defense of their rights as Englishmen to a revolution aimed at overthrowing the existing form of government. It did not establish a structure of government and.should not be confused with.either the Articles of Confederation or the Constitution of the United States.
    The declaration declared the Thirteen Colonies represented in the Continental Congress independent from Great Britain, offered reasons for the separation, and laid out the principles for which the Revolutionary War was fought. The signers included John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, John Hancock, and Jefferson.

The declaration begins.(capitalization and punctuation are modernized):.When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another and to assume, among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the laws of nature and of nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness; that to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed; that whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it and to institute new government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness.
    Today, each page of the Declaration of Independence is protected in a glass and bronze case filled with inert helium gas and monitored with sophisticated computer technology for any signs of deterioration. Over one million Americans view the document each year in the rotunda of the National Archives Building in Washington, D.C., where it is displayed along with the Constitution of the United States and the Bill of Rights.
    The day of the adoption of the.Declaration of Independence.is now commemorated as the Fourth day of July, or Independence Day.

Independence Day, in the U.S.A., an annual holiday commemorating the formal adoption by the Continental Congress of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, in Philadelphia. Although the signing of the Declaration was not completed until August, the Fourth of July holiday has been accepted as the official anniversary of United States independence and is celebrated in all states and territories of the U.S.A.
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Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

deem, deemed, deeming, deems
to regard as; consider (deemed the results conclusive); think; believe; to have as an opinion; to come to think or judge consider (deemed it wise to go slow); judge; to have an opinion believe; consider

de facto
actually exercising power though not legally or officially established (a de facto government)

delegate, delegated, delegating, delegates, delegator
to commit or entrust to another (delegate a task to a subordinate); a person authorized to act as representative for another; a deputy or an agent; a representative to a conference or convention; a member of a House of Delegates, the lower house of the Maryland, Virginia, or West Virginia legislature; an elected or appointed representative of a U.S. territory in the House of Representatives who is entitled to speak but not vote; to authorize and send (another person) as one's representative

deliberate
done with or marked by full consciousness of the nature and effects; intentional (mistook the oversight for a deliberate insult); arising from or marked by careful consideration (a deliberate decision); unhurried in action, movement, or manner, as if trying to avoid error (moved at a deliberate pace)

deliberate, deliberated, deliberating, deliberates, deliberately, deliberateness
to think carefully and often slowly, as about a choice to be made; to consult with another or others in a process of reaching a decision; to consider (a matter) carefully and often slowly, as by weighing alternatives; ponder

deliberation, deliberations
the act or process of deliberating; discussion and consideration of all sides of an issue (the deliberations of a jury); thoughtfulness in decision or action; leisureliness in motion or manner (the child stacked the blocks with deliberation)

de jure
in accordance with law 
Law:.according to law; by right

demographics, demographic.also.demographical, demographically, demography
the characteristics of human populations and population segments, especially when used to identify consumer markets (the demographics of the Southwest indicate a growing population of older consumers); of or relating to demography; the study of the characteristics of human populations, such as size, growth, density, distribution, and vital statistics
demographer
one who works with demographic statistics and trends

demote, demoted, demoting, demotes, demotion
to reduce in grade, rank, or status

despot, despotic, despotically
a ruler with absolute power; dictator; autocrat; a person who wields power oppressively; a tyrant

detriment, detrimental
anything that causes damage or injury; exceedingly harmful; implies obvious harmfulness to something specified (the detrimental effects of excessive drinking); causing damage; harmful; pernicious

deviate
to turn aside from a correct course; diverge; digress; a sexual pervert
deviation
divergence; a turning aside 
deviator
a person or thing that deviates 
veer, swerve, diverge, digress
deviant
differing from a norm or from the accepted standards
deviant
something that differs from a norm, especially a person whose behavior and attitudes differ from accepted social standards
deviance.or.deviancy

devious, deviously, deviousness
underhanded; shifty (a devious political maneuver); erring (achieved success by devious means); departing from the correct or accepted way; not straightforward; deviating from the proper course; going astray; crooked; winding; rambling; deviating from the straight or direct course; roundabout (a devious route)

diametrical.also.diametric, diametrically
exactly opposite; contrary; of, relating to, or along a diameter

dictator
an absolute ruler; a tyrant; a despot; one who dictates

dictate, dictated, dictating, dictates
to control or command; to issue orders or commands; to say or read aloud to be recorded or written by another (dictate a letter; to prescribe with authority); impose (dictated the rules of the game); to say or read aloud material to be recorded or written by another (dictated for an hour before leaving for the day); a directive; a command; a guiding principle (followed the dictates of my conscience)
dictatorial, dictatorially, dictatorialness
tending to dictate; domineering; of, relating to, or characteristic of a dictator or dictatorship; autocratic

dictatorship
the office or tenure of a dictator; a state or government under dictatorial rule; absolute or despotic control or power

dignity
calm self possession and self respect; of merit, worth; worthiness; stateliness; worthiness; a person's degree of worth; worthy of respect

dignified
having or showing dignity or stateliness

dispute, disputed, disputing, disputes, disputer
to argue about; debate; to question the truth or validity of; doubt (her friends disputed her intentions.); to strive to win (a prize, for example); contest for (our team disputed the visitors' claim to the championship; to strive against; resist (disputed the actions of his competitors; to engage in discussion or argument; debate; discuss; to quarrel angrily; a verbal controversy; a debate; an angry altercation; a quarrel; argument

disputation
a disputing; dispute; controversial discussion; debate; argument

disputatious
inclined to dispute; fond of arguing; contentious

disputative
disputacious; having to do with disputation

disputable
that can be disputed; debatable 

disputant
a person who disputes or debates 

disputably
in a disputable manner

District of Columbia
District of Columbiafederal district of the United States, not the United States of America, and within the city of Washington, D.C., the national capital. It is situated on the Potomac and Anacostia rivers and was created in 1790 with land given by Maryland and Virginia to comprise an area of 100 square miles (about 259 sq km). To create this District of Columbia, bills.(what's a bill?).were passed by the U.S.A..Congress in 1790 and 1791 to create this district on a tract of land ceded by Maryland and Virginia, who gave up some land and, along with other of the 13 states.(former colonies of Britain), a portion of their sovereign rights, necessary for Eminent Domain status to be possessed by the federal government they were creating. The area contained the communities of Alexandria and Washington. The cornerstone of the U.S. Capitol was laid in 1793 and in 1800 the Congress of the United States moved here from its provisional headquarters in Philadelphia. In 1846, Congress agreed to return Alexandria and the remainder of the District on the western bank of the Potomac to the state of Virginia. Georgetown held the status of a separate town within the District from 1878 to 1895, when it was merged with Washington. Population of metropolitan area in 1996 was estimated at 4,563,000..comprised from Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

dominion.(*)
control or the exercise of control; sovereignty; territory or sphere of influence or control; a realm; colony

dormant
marked by a suspension of activity (a dormant volcano); temporarily in abeyance yet capable of being activated; asleep, inactive; having the faculties suspended; latent

draft, draft, drafted, drafting, drafts
a preliminary (beginning) outline of a plan, document, or picture (the first draft of a bill); to draw up a preliminary version of or plan for; to create by thinking and writing; compose (draft a speech)

duly
in a proper manner (a duly appointed official); at the expected time
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