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C r e a t i o n  I n d e x

C r e a t i o n  p a g e  3 3

The olfactory.(sense of smell).epithelium.(a tissue in vertebrates consisting of closely packed cells in a sheet).contains some 50 million specialized cells. Within these cells are molecules called receptors. These bind to the odor molecules generating electrical nerve signals which are sent to the olfactory bulb from where they are routed to the brain, where analysis towards smell recognition takes place. This involves memory

What a sniffer! Polar bears can smell a seal twenty miles away!

Dogs have fifty times as many cells devoted to the sense of smell than we do. Dogs have a prostate gland, as humans do, but not other animals! Why do dogs bark, cats meow, birds tweet and buffalos grunt? Why are their vocal cords all different if not designed by Creator-God to be that way? Evolution can provide no satisfactory answer for these out of its repertoire of idiotic reasonings, nor any answers for so many other conundrums regarding the development of living organisms. It should not even be called a theory because it's nothing but a fairy tale for the gullible.

Humans are capable of detecting scents down to a remarkable concentration of one part in 30 billion and humans can detect some 10,000 different odors with only 1000 different types of receptor cells. These 1000 receptor cells are coded for by the 1000 genes concerned with detection of odor molecules, yet we can detect some 10,000 different scents because a range of receptors responds to each cell molecule. The conundrum is: How does a scent bring about a particular associated thought? A walk in a summer flower garden and you notice a scent like a girlfriend wore when you were a teener.

In rats, a single receptor can bind to 74 different odor molecules. Also, many receptors respond to the same odor molecule. Like language letters used over and over again to define words, each receptor is used over and over again to define an odor. Each smell molecule has its own unique chemical structure. It's an irreducibly complex system. How did it come to be determined of the 1000 receptors, which should cooperate with what other specific receptor molecules in order to recognize unique scents? Why do they remain in the affinity they form? Imagining all these factors assembled themselves over time by evolutionary processes, is the height of idiocy.

Octanol differs from octanol acid by one oxygen atom and two hydrogen atoms. Octanol smells of oranges, the other of sweat. Limonenc exists in two forms, the difference being the arrangement of atoms. One form smells of oranges, the other of lemons; carvone of spearmint, the other of peppermint. Indole smells of flowers at low concentration, of high concentrations it smells putrid.(rotten and foul smelling). Hidden in the depths of this irreducibly complex design is exactly how chemical structure relates to the smell you get from a molecule.

The psychology also enters into our perceptions of smells. Associative memories of scents may mean very different things to many people. 

The ability to smell and respond to phermones without memory being resident for recognition of scents, would have put a gradually developing organism.(Darwin's gradualism idea).at high risk from poisonous food. The human race and the animals would have been doomed from inception if Darwinism was true.

Reproductive system: Evolutionary scientists aren't sure how it came about. Where did the ability to reproduce come from? Why was the intelligence there to reproduce? Why, in fact, is there even life in the first place? It had to be inherent with the first living organism. And if so that it was surviving androgynously, what need then for it to leave its asexuality, becoming both male and female? And if it did somehow find this need, why and how did it determine that one other sex was enough. Why not 10 or 50?

If the first living organism was one cell; wherewith the intelligence to enable its unfolding into a mature highly complex.organism such as a plant, animal, or man? How is it that molecules even have an ability to self-replicate? And if they can duplicate, which they most certainly can, how come all matter, most of it highly complex, is not the same? And what exactly do the genes do? They appear to have more to do with a plant's genus.(kind).and unfolding.(time).whereas, the dynamics of plant growth, giving forth the particular.patterns, are governed by the laws of physics.

How a cell brings the two genomes.(male and female).into balance is not understood. They seem to have some sort of built in clock.."The genomes amazingly keep apart until the third cell division."....Thomas Heat, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Genetics, Berlin, Germany.

Some people estimate that we have 125 billion miles of DNA in us. Functions are understood for only about 3% of all DNA by most scientists, but others understand it all. DNA avails itself of a vast storage capacity of incredible smallness, a capacity far greater than present available storage in the largest computers. This capacity enables DNA and RNA.to hold the complex blueprints of living organisms.

A single fertilized egg contains chemical instructions that would fill 500,000 pages, which would take 3,500 Megabytes.(or, 3.5 Gigabytes).of computer space, or the equivalent of 78 CDs. And that's only the egg! And, a list of DNA units making up the human genome would fill 2 large telephone books and that's just the list of 3 billion DNA base pairs.(designated by letters).on the 23 chromosomes in our cells. It has been estimated by Sydney Brenner, Molecular Sciences Institute in Berkeley, California that each gene will require at least 40 years of study with the present number of scientists involved in researching such matters.
   


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