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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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microbe.noun,.plural.microbes
a very small living thing; a minute life form; a micro.organism like a bacteria(especially a bacterium {singular of bacteria} that causes disease), some of which eat rust and live in the equivalent of battery acid, while others live in poop! Other microbes are in our bodies to clean up garbage;.Scientific American Magazine.September 23, 2015 reported on an article by Meadow JF, Altrichter AE, Bateman AC, Stenson J, Brown G, Green JL, Bohannan BJM. (2015).Humans differ in their personal microbial cloud. PeerJ 3:e1258"...individuals release their own personalized microbial cloud...through direct human contact with indoor surfaces,  bioaerosol particle emission from our breath, clothes, skin and hair and resuspension of indoor dust containing previously shed human skin cells, hair and other bacteria-laden particles. While indoors, we are constantly interacting with microbes other people have left behind on the chairs in which we sit, in dust we perturb and on every surface we touch. These human-microbial interactions are in addition to the microbes our pets leave in our houses, those that blow off of tree leaves and soils, those in the food we eat and the water we drink. It is becoming increasingly clear that we have evolved with these complex microbial interactions and that we may depend on them for our well-being (Rook, 2013). It is now apparent, given the results presented here, that the microbes we encounter include those actively emitted by other humans, including our families, coworkers and perfect strangers."

microtubule.noun,.plural.microtubules
any of the proteinaceous cylindrical hollow minute.filament structures that are distributed throughout the cytoplasm of living  eukaryotic cells, providing structural support and assisting in cellular locomotion and transport; composed of the protein.tubulin and occurring in pairs, triplets or bundles, they help cells maintain their shape and are the rails for the molecular motor kinesin to transport proteins around inside the cell; cytoskeleton fibres are composed of microtubules and actin.microfilaments
microtubular.adjective

Microtubules have an unstable shape. Why would Creator-God design a structure with such instability? He obviously knows what He is doing.

Ian Stewart says that the mathematical answer in this case is, a little bit of instability is a virtue. He explains that because molecules stick together, the seemingly unsteady structure is a lot more reliable than would at first appear.

The long cleavage lines where the structure is weak also turn out to be an advantage. Not only can microtubules grow longer by adding another layer of protein bricks, but they can also shorten, coming apart at the seams along those cleavage lines like peeling a banana. In fact they shorten about 10 times quicker than they grow. Various chemical signals control the production, construction and demolition of microtubules. These are initiated from information received via and after analysis by, the body's computers.

myosin.noun
the commonest protein in muscle cells, responsible for the elastic and contractile protein of muscle combining with actin to form actomyosin

millihertz.noun
one Hertz is equal to one cycle per second (as a sine {bending curve, as a sound wave would be} wave, for example)' milli equals one thousandth of a thousand; the one thousandth part of whatever

molecular.adjective
of, relating to or consisting of molecules
molecularly.adverb
molecularity.noun

molecule.noun,.plural.molecules
the smallest particle-(two or more atoms-covalently bonded to each other) of an element or compound-(substance) that can still exist in the free state and still retain the characteristics of the element (retain the specific chemical properties of that substance) or compound; if a molecule is broken into anything smaller, the parts differ in nature from the original substance. Each molecule can be made of millions of atoms. Molecules constantly flex. It takes many molecules to make the smallest structural unit of an organism that is capable of independent functioning, which is a cell

monosaccharide.noun,.plural.monosaccharides
a simple sugar, as glucose

morphosis.noun,.plural.morphoses
the manner in which an organism or any of its parts changes form or undergoes development

mutate, mutated, mutating, mutates.both intransitive and transitive verbs
to undergo or cause to undergo mutation
mutative.adjective
mutagen.noun,.plural.mutagens
a substance or preparation.capable of inducing or accelerating.mutation; an agent, such as ultraviolet light or a radioactive element, that can induce or increase the frequency of mutation in an organism
mutagenic.adjective
mutagenically.adverb
mutagenicity.noun,.plural.mutagenicities
mutagen.noun,.plural.mutagens
an agent that causes an increase in the number of mutations
mutant.adjective
mutant.noun,.plural.mutants
undergoing mutation or changing
an individual, an organism or a new genetic character arising or resulting from mutation

mammal.noun,.plural.mammals
any of a group of vertebrates the females of which have milk secreting glands (mammary glands) for feeding their offspring. Excellent mammal book,-Mammals of North America, (1999), by Adrian Forsyth, Firefly Books

migrate, migrated, migrating, migrates.intransitive verbs
to move from one place to another (many birds migrate to warmer climates once winter approaches); to immigrate
migrator.noun,.plural.migrators
migration.noun,.plural.migrations
the act or an instance of migrating (a group migrating together)
migrational.adjective
migratory.adjective
characterized by migration; undergoing periodic migration (migratory birds); of or relating to a migration; roving; nomadic
migrant.noun,.plural.migrants
one that moves from one region to another by chance, instinct or plan; an itinerant worker who travels from one area to another in search of work
migrant.adjective

miniature, miniaturist.nouns
a copy on a much reduced scale; something small of its kind; in miniature; in a greatly diminished size form or scale
miniaturistic.adjective

misanthrope.noun,.plural.misanthropes
hating mankind; a person who hates or distrusts all people 
misanthropist.noun,.plural.misanthropists
a misanthrope 
misanthropic, misanthropical.adjectives
having the nature of a misanthrope 
misanthropy.noun
the feelings or actions of a misanthrope

mitosis.noun,.plural.mitoses
mitotic.adjective
(see also meiosis)
the process in cell division by which the nucleus divides to increase the amount of cells as determined by the design of the Creator and which typically consists of five stages, interphase (the stage of a cell between two successive mitotic or meiotic-{cell division in sexually reproducing organisms that reduces the number of chromosomes in reproductive cells, leading to the production of gametes in animals and spores in plants}-divisions),-prophase-(the first stage of mitosis, during which the chromosomes condense and become visible, the nuclear membrane breaks down and the spindle apparatus forms at opposite poles of the cell. prophase is also the first stage of meiosis, constituted by a series of events that include DNA replication, the synapsis of homologous chromosomes, crossing over, the formation of chiasmata and contraction of the chromosomes),-metaphase-(the stage of mitosis and meiosis, following prophase and preceding anaphase, during which the chromosomes are aligned along the metaphase plate),-anaphase (the stage of mitosis and meiosis in which the chromosomes move to opposite ends of the nuclear spindle), and-telophase-(the final stage of mitosis or meiosis during which the chromosomes of daughter cells are grouped in new nuclei), and normally resulting in two new nuclei, each of which contains a complete copy of the parental chromosomes. Also called karyokinesis

Mitosis is a method of cell division spurred by the build up of proteins called cyclins (or to put it anoter way 'cyclins are the proteins that spur mitosis') in the cell, in which the nuclear.chromatin is formed into a long thread, which in turn breaks into segments-(chromosomes) that are split lengthwise, then moving to the opposite ends of the cell. 

Just prior to division an enzyme called polymerase triggers each base-to pair up. The halves then form new nuclear membranes around the chromosomes and a new cell wall forms, coming together in two sets, each set forming the nucleus for a new cell; and thus, two new double stranded-DNA-molecule are created, identical to the original, each of which contains a complete copy of the parental chromosomes.

Before the cell can complete its mitotic division, it must cut up its cyclins. This is different than the method used to remove old proteins.

The entire process (some parts of it are intensely complex with some horrendously so, like protein instructions) is managed by the body's-many-computers. A computation (with 4 factors, not just like the 2 we have in computers today, being 0's and 1's for ons and offs) occurs each time of cell division. The complexity involved is dumbfounding! Information stored in a set of DNA molecules is copied into a new set. And, bases in DNA connect in a specific manner. In this process is monstrous computing power.-

That's the kind of brilliance this Creator-God possesses who, thankfully, is as loving as He is intelligent.

mitogen.noun,.plural.mitogens
an agent that induces.mitosis
mitogenic.adjective
mitogenicity.noun,.plural.mitogenicities

mussel.noun,.plural.mussels
a marine bivalve mollusk (especially genus Mytilus) usually having a dark elongated shell; a freshwater bivalve mollusk (as of Unio, Anodonta or related genera) that is especially abundant in rivers of the central U.S. and has a shell with a lustrous nacreous (iridescent; lustrous) lining

By looking at nature, such as the mussel, scientists can develop helpful products.

mycelium.noun,.plural.mycelia
the vegetative part of a fungus, consisting of a mass of branching, threadlike hyphae (threadlike filaments forming the mycelium of a fungus) as found in mushrooms which are held together by mycelium that's only one cell thick; mycelium is also found under trees.forging a network of tree communication; a similar mass of fibers formed by certain bacteria; see Paul Stamets, expert on mushrooms
mycelial.adjective

manifold.adjective
many and varied; many sided; of many kinds; multiple (our manifold choices); having many features or forms
manifold.noun
a whole composed of diverse elements; one of several copies; a pipe or chamber having multiple apertures for making connections (a vehicles engine manifold)
manifold, manifolded, manifolding, manifolds.transitive verbs
to make several copies of, as with carbon paper; to make manifold; multiply
manifoldly.adverb
manifoldness.noun

mandrake.noun
a southern European plant (Mandragora officinarum) having greenish-yellow flowers and a branched root. This plant's root resembles the human body, similar to the ginseng root; the root of the mandrake contains the poisonous alkaloid hyoscyamine; the mandrake is also called mandragora; mandrakes possess stimulating and narcotic.properties (Genesis 30:14-16); the fruit of this plant resembles the potato-apple in size and is of a pale orange colour; it has been called the 'love-apple'; the Arabs call it 'Satan's apple'; it still grows near Jerusalem and in other parts of Palestine

monism.noun,.plural.monisms
a philosophy holding the view in metaphysics that reality is a unified.whole and that all existing things can be ascribed to or described by a single concept or system; the doctrine that mind and matter are formed or reducible to the same ultimate.substance or principle of being
monist.noun,.plural.monists
monistic.adjective
monistically.adverb

monastery.noun,.plural.monasterries
a community of persons, especially monks, bound by vows to a religious life and often living in partial or complete seclusion; the dwelling place of such a community
monasterial.adjective

monastic.also.monastical.adjective
of, relating.to.or.characteristic of a monastery; used often of monks and nuns; resembling life in a monastery in style, structure or manner, especially secluded and contemplative, disciplined or regimented; self-abnegating; austere
monastic.noun
a monk; to live alone
monastically.adverb

monk.noun,.plural.monks
a man who is a member of a brotherhood living in a monastery and devoted to a discipline.prescribed by his order (a Buddhist monk)

miser.noun,.plural.misers
one who lives very meagerly in order to hoard money; a greedy or avaricious person
miserly.adjective
of, relating.to.or.characteristic of a miser; avaricious, grasping; stingy
miserliness.noun

muck.noun
a moist, sticky mixture, especially of mud and filth; moist farmyard dung; manure; dark, fertile soil containing decaying vegetable matter; something filthy or disgusting; earth, rocks or clay excavated in mining
muck, mucked, mucking, mucks.transitive verbs
to fertilize with manure or compost; to make dirty with or as if with muck; to remove muck or dirt from a mine, for example
muckily.adverb
mucky.adjective
muck up.phrasal verb
to bungle, damage or ruin
muck about.phrasal verb
to spend time idly; putter

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