.
.
S i t e  S e a r c h

A_B_C_D_E_F_G_H_I_J_K_L_M_N_O_P_Q_R_S_T_U_V_W_XYZ

List of Topics__Ask Suby__Free Stuff__Questions Lists
Terms of Use__________________Privacy Policy

Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
Use the BACK button on your browser to return

Keller, Helen
American lecturer and writer Helen Keller overcame severe physical disablities, inspiring many other people to similar accomplishments. Deaf and blind from the age of 19 months, Keller learned to communicate with the help of her teacher, Anne Sullivan. Sullivan taught Keller to read Braille and to 'listen' by feeling a speaker's face. Keller graduated from Radcliffe College in 1904 and authored a number of books about her experiences..Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Some quotes of hers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.

Immanuel Kant, 1724-1804. German idealist philosopher who argued that reason is the means by which the phenomena of experience are translated into understanding. His classic works include.Critique of Pure Reason.(1781) and.Critique of Practical Reason.(1788), in which he put forward his system of ethics based on the categorical imperative.Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Kantian.adjective.and.noun

Arthur Koestler.1905-1983
Hungarian-born writer whose novel Darkness at Noon, 1941, portrays his disillusionment with Communism. His other works include The Sleepwalkers, 1959 and The Ghost in the Machine, 1967

kangaroo court.noun
a mock court set up in moral violation of honest and fair examination procedures by peers; a court characterized by dishonesty or incompetence in order to get rid of someone by some means; an unjust.court

kind, kinder, kindest.adjectives
of a friendly warm-hearted nature wanting the best for another; being aware of need and helpful toward it; considerate (kind to animals; the story of Mikey & Paul); forbearing; tolerant (our neighbor was very kind about the window we broke); agreeable; beneficial (a dry climate is kind to some people who have asthma)
kindly, kindlier, kindliest.adjectives
of a sympathetic, helpful or benevolent.nature (a kindly interest; a gentle, kindly soul); agreeable; pleasant (a kindly breeze)
kindly.adverb
out of kindness (she kindly overlooked the mistake); in a kind manner (he spoke kindly to us of his parents); pleasantly; agreeably (the Sun shone kindly); in an accommodating manner (would you kindly fill in your name and address?)
kindless.adjective
exhibiting or feeling no kindness or compassion; heartless (a kindless refusal to listen shows disagreeable.arrogance)
kindness.noun
the quality or state of being kind; an instance of kind behavior

kind.noun,.plural.kinds
a group of individuals linked by traits held in common; a particular.variety; a sort.(different kinds of beans; what kind of soap do you like best?); type; if you are receiving of life in like kind to how you have been with others, you are living proof of the universal law of reaping what you have sown

kakistocracy.noun,.plural.kakistocracies
government by the least qualified or most unprincipled people; rulership by the worst leader and his or her dweebs

knapsack.noun,.plural.knapsacks
a bag made of sturdy material and furnished with shoulder straps, designed for carrying articles (many students carry their books and a computer in their knapsacks)

Kierkegaard, Søren Aaby.1813-1855. Danish religious philosopher. A precursor of modern existentialism, he insisted on the need for individual decision and leaps of faith in the search for religious truth, thereby contradicting.prevalent.religious.dogma and Hegelianism. His works include Either/Or and Fear and Trembling (both 1843). A quote of his. He wrote over twenty books in fourteen years.

He applied the term existential to his philosophy because he regarded philosophy as the expression of an intensely examined individual life, not as the construction of a monolithic system in the manner of the 19th-century German philosopher G.W.F. Hegel, whose work he attacked in Concluding Unscientific Postscript, 1846; translated 1941. Hegel claimed to have achieved a complete rational understanding of human life and history; Kierkegaard, on the other hand, stressed the ambiguity and paradoxical nature of the human situation. The fundamental problems of life, he contended, defy rational, objective explanation; the highest truth is subjective.

Kierkegaard maintained that systematic philosophy not only imposes a false perspective on human existence but that it also, by explaining life in terms of logical.necessity, becomes a means of avoiding choice and responsibility. Individuals, he believed, create their own natures through their choices, which must be made in the absence of universal, objective standards. The validity of a choice can only be determined subjectively.
In his first major work, Either/Or (2 volumes, 1843; translated 1944), Kierkegaard described two stages of existence, that the individual may choose, the aesthetic and the ethical. The aesthetic way of life is a refined.hedonism, consisting of a search for pleasure and a cultivation of mood. The aesthetic individual constantly seeks variety and novelty in an effort to stave off boredom but eventually must confront boredom and despair. The ethical way of life involves an intense, passionate.commitment to duty, to unconditional.social and religious obligations. In his later works, such as Stages on Life's Way (1845; translated 1940), Kierkegaard discerned in this submission to duty a loss of individual responsibility and he proposed a third stage, the religious, in which one submits to the will of God but in doing so finds authentic freedom. In Fear and Trembling (1846; translated 1941) Kierkegaard focused on Abraham and his son Isaac: Genesis 22:1-13. Kierkegaard felt that this was an act that violated Abraham's ethical convictions. Abraham proves his faith by resolutely setting out to obey God, even though he cannot understand the how's and why's of it. Kierkegaard called this a 'suspension of the ethical' which allowed Abraham to achieve an authentic commitment to God. To avoid ultimate despair, the individual must make a similar 'leap of faith' into a religious life, which is inherently.paradoxical, mysterious and, without belief in  the supremacy of God, risky. Kierkegaard felt that one is called to similar actions by a feeling of dread (The Concept of Dread, 1844; translated 1944), which is ultimately a fear of nothingness. He denounced modern European society in The Present Age (1846; translated 1940) for its lack of passion and for its quantitative.values.....comprised with Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

killjoy.noun,.plural.killjoys
if you call someone a killjoy, you are critical of them because they interfere with the enjoyment of living other people may have, by reminding them of something unpleasant; one who spoils the enthusiasm or fun of others

kid.noun,.plural.kids
a young goat and he young of a similar animal, such as an antelope; leather made from the skin of a young goat; kidskin
kidskin.noun,.plural.kidskins
an article made from this leather (the cowboy wore a kidskin vest); a child; a young person (she moved close to a schoolyard in order to hear the kids laughing and playing as it was music to her lonely ears)
kid.adjective
younger than oneself (my kid brother); the leather called kid leather
kid, kidded, kidding, kids.verbs
transitive verb use.to mock playfully; tease; banter; to deceive but all in fun (she was just kidding around); fool; to do a practical joke
kid yourself
to let yourself believe something that is untrue or unlikely (kid yourself that (don't kid yourself saying she'll never change, she's just not ready yet; they said we could never change the world (just who were they trying to kid?)
kid around, kidded around, kidding around, kids around.verbs
joke, jest, crack a joke, pun, tease, fool around
intransitive verb use.to engage in teasing or good-humored fooling
kidder.noun,.plural.kidders
kiddingly.adverb

Knights of the Round Table
At the round table were places for the knights, round so that no one should seem to be more important than any of the others. The knights were mostly concerned with the quest of the Holy Grail. Some of the most famous knights were Sir Lancelot, Sir Galahad, Sir Gawain, Sir Kay and Sir Mordred. A list of the knights and a description of their armor is given in the Theatre of Honour (1622 A.D.) by Andrew Fairne. The ruins of a castle built in 1235 A.D. by William the Conqueror in Winchester, England, evidences a very large hall with a round table affixed to a wall. The table is 18 feet (5.5 metres) in diameter. Were these knights the Knights Templars?

Knight Templar.noun,.plural.Knights Templars
The Knights Templars were a group founded about 1118 A.D. to protect pilgrims in the Holy Land from Muslims who continually interrupted their travels. This led to the Crusades, a long series of wars. The First Crusade was a war against Muslims who were taking over lands. The Second Crusade participants were suppressed into secrecy in 1312, locating on provincial estates, called preceptories. The Knights Templars were also called the Knights of the Temple of Solomon. They were the military and Christian religious.group of knights during the Middle Ages, who protected those traveling in and to the Holy Land (Jerusalem) during the Crusades. A man belonging to a Masonic order in the United States later came to be known as a Knight Templar.

knight, knighted, knighting, knights
a knight is a man with a high rank in the past who was trained to fight while riding a horse (knights in armor; white knights); a knight is a man who has been knighted; in medieval times, a knight was a man of noble birth, who served his king or lord in battle; if someone is knighted, they are given a knighthood; if you refer to someone as a 'knight in shining armour', you mean that they are kind and brave and likely to rescue you from a difficult situation; in the game of chess, a knight is a piece which is shaped like a horse's head
knighthood.noun,.plural.knighthoods
a knighthood is a title that is given to a man by a British king or queen for his achievements, for doing good things and for his service to his country; a man who has been given a knighthood can put 'Sir' in front of his name instead of 'Mr.'

kine.noun plural
plural of cow; cows

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
*