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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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redound, redounded, redounding, redounds.intransitive verbs
to have an effect or consequence (deeds that redound to one's discredit); to return; recoil

rummage, rummaged, rummaging, rummages.verbs
transitive verb use.to search thoroughly by handling, turning over or disarranging the contents of; to discover by searching thoroughly
intransitive verb use.to make an energetic, usually hasty search
rummage, rummager.nouns
a thorough search among a number of things; a confusion of miscellaneous.articles

requite, requited, requiting, requites.transitive verbs
to make return for; repay; to make suitable return to for a benefit or service or for an injury; to make repayment or return for (requite another's love); reciprocate; interchange; barter; exchange; to make retaliation for; avenge
requitable.adjective
requiter.noun,.plural.requiters
requital.noun,.plural.requitals
the act of requiting; return, as for an injury or a friendly act

reprobate.noun,.plural.reprobates.
Bible meaning of the word; a morally.unprincipled person; if you describe someone as a reprobate, you mean that they behave in a way that is not respectable or morally.correct
reprobate.adjective
morally.unprincipled; shameless
reprobater, reprobated, reprobating, reprobates.transitive verbs
to disapprove of; condemn
reprobative.adjective
reprobation.noun

regret, regretted, regretting, regrets.verbs
transitive verb use.to feel sorry, disappointed or distressed about; to remember with a feeling of loss or sorrow; mourn
intransitive verb use.to feel regret
regret.noun,.plural.regrets
regretful.adjective
full of regret; sorrowful or sorry
regretfully.adverb
regretfulness.noun
regrettable.adjective
eliciting or deserving regret (a regrettable response; regrettable remarks); regretfully is used as a normal adverb to mean 'in a regretful manner', but it is also used as a sentence adverb meaning 'it is regrettable that' (regretfully, they abandoned the climb due to the strength of the storm increasing; Emma shook her head regretfully); regretfully is synonymous with regrettably; used to show that you are sorry that is the case and you wish the situation were different
regrettably.adverb
to an extent deserving of regret; (as a matter of regret (regrettably, the book is not available)

rouse, roused, rousing, rouses.transitive verbs
to arouse from slumber, apathy or depression; to excite, as to anger or action; stir up; provoke
intransitive verbs-to awaken; to become active
rouse.noun
the act or an instance of arousing
rouser.noun

revere, revered, revering, reveres.transitive verbs
to regard with awe, deference and devotion
reverence,.noun,.plural.reverences
reverencer.noun,.plural.reverencers
a feeling of profound-awe and respect and often love; veneration; an act showing respect, especially a bow or curtsy; the state of being revered
reverence, reverenced, reverencing, reverences.transitive verbs
to consider or treat with profound-awe and respect; venerate
reverential.adjective
expressing reverence; reverent; inspiring reverence
reverentially.adverb
reverent.adjective
marked by, feeling or expressing reverence
reverently.adverb
reverend.adjective
deserving reverence; relating.to.or.characteristic of the clergy; clerical; Reverend, abbreviation Rev. used as a title and form of address for certain clerics in many Christian churches; in formal usage, preceded by 'the' as in,.the Reverend Jane Doe.and.the Reverend John Jones
reverend.noun,.plural.reverends
a cleric or minister

regime.noun,.plural.regimes
if you refer to a government or system of running a country as a regime, you are critical of it because you think it is acting in its own selfish interests using devious unacceptable methods of maintaining control; a form of government (a fascist regime); a government in power; administration (suffered under the new regime); a prevailing social system; the period during which a particular administration or system prevails (she left working in a government office regime, but going into private enterprise found it to be the same); a regulated system, as of diet and exercise; a regimen

rather.adverb
to a certain extent; somewhat (it is rather cold today); more readily; preferably (I'd rather go to the movies); with more reason, logic, wisdom or other justification; more exactly; more accurately (he's rather a good friend); on the contrary
Usage note: In expressions of preference 'rather' is commonly preceded by 'would' or in formal style 'should' (we would rather rent the house than buy it outright; I 'should' rather my daughter attend a Christian school); the use of 'had' in these constructions may now be more infrequent than it once was but is still encountered in reputable writing (I 'had' rather be happy than be a slave; I'd rather stay); notice that in these constructions 'would' and 'should' cannot be used; this use of 'had' shows an unbroken line of usage running back to Middle English and traditional criticisms of these constructions are unfounded; before an unmodified noun, only 'rather a' is used (it was 'rather' a disaster); when the noun is preceded by an adjective, however, both 'rather a' and 'a rather' are found (it was rather a boring party); when 'a rather' is used in this construction, rather can be construed as qualifying only the adjective, whereas with 'rather a' it can be construed as qualifying either the adjective or the entire noun phrase; thus 'a rather long ordeal' can mean only "an ordeal that is rather long", whereas 'rather a long ordeal' can also mean roughly "a long process that is something of an ordeal"; 'rather a' is the only possible choice when the adjective itself does not permit modification (the horse was rather a long shot; not, the horse was a rather long shot)
rather than.conjunction
used with the infinitive form of a verb to indicate.negation as a contrary choice or wish (rather than argue, he passively listened; chose to be an electrician rather than play violin; why do one thing rather than another?; happy rather than sad)
rather than.preposition
(rather than being pleased, she became angry)

rapacious.adjective
taking by force; plundering; greedy; ravenous; voracious; subsisting on live prey
rapaciously.adverb
rapacity.or.rapaciousness.noun

resist, resisted, resisting, resists.verbs
transitive verb use.to strive to fend off or offset the actions, effects or force of; to remain firm against the actions, effects or force of; withstand; to keep from giving in to or enjoying
intransitive verb use.to offer resistance; oppose
resist.noun
a substance that can cover and protect a surface, as from corrosion (where's the resist for the car hood?)
resister.noun
resistive.adjective
of, tending toward or marked by resistance (a person resistive to change)
resistively.adverb
resistiveness.noun

resistance.noun
the act or an instance of resisting or the capacity to resist; a force that tends to oppose or retard motion
Electricity:.the opposition of a body or substance to current passing through it, resulting in a change of electrical energy into heat or another form of energy
resistant.adjective

ravening.adjective
greedily predacious; voracious or rapacious
ravening.noun
the action of one that ravens
raveningly.adverb
raven, ravened, ravening, ravens.verbs
also spelled.ravin; welcome to the descriptive but confusing.hodgepodge of the English language; more examples
transitive verb use.raven means to consume greedily; devour; to seek or seize as prey or plunder
intransitive verb use.to seek or seize prey or plunder
raven.noun
voracity; rapaciousness; something taken as prey; the act or practice of preying
ravener.noun,.plural.raveners
ravenous.adjective
extremely hungry; voracious; rapacious; predatory; greedy for gratification
ravenously.adverb
ravenousness.noun

reap, reaped, reaping, reaps.verbs
transitive verb use.to cut grain or pulse for harvest with a scythe, sickle or reaper; to harvest a crop; to harvest a crop from (reaping a field); to obtain as a result of effort or desire (she reaped large profits from her unique invention; he reaped the violent life he lived:.Matthew 26:52; reaping the poor for selfish gain:.Job 24:2-9)
intransitive verb use.to cut or harvest grain or pulse; to obtain a return or reward
reaper.noun,.plural.reapers
for example, a farmer that reaps, often using a machine for harvesting grain or pulse crops

rage.noun,.plural.rages
violent, explosive.anger; a fit of anger; furious.intensity, as of a storm; a burning desire; a passion; a current, eagerly.adopted fashion; a fad or craze (when torn jeans were all the rage)
rage, raged, raging, rages.intransitive verbs
to speak or act in violent.anger (raged at the mindless bureaucracy); to move with great violence.or intensity (a storm raged through the mountains); to spread or prevail forcefully (the storm raged for days)

release, released, releasing, releases.transitive verbs
to free from something that binds, fastens or holds back; let go (released the balloons; released a flood of questions); to set free from confinement, restraint or bondage (released the unlawfully held prisoners); to dismiss, as from a job; to relieve of debt or obligation; to relieve of care and suffering; to issue for performance, sale, publication or distribution (the latest issue of the monthly magazine)
release.noun,.plural.releases
an unfastening or letting go of something caught or held fast (the kids released the bird after caring for its wing); a device or catch for locking or releasing a mechanism (release the bikes from their locks and let's go for a ride); the act or an instance of issuing something for publication, use or distribution; something thus released (a press release); in law, relinquishment to another of a right, title or claim; the document.authorizing such relinquishment; a deliverance or liberation, as from confinement, restraint or suffering

rotavirus.noun,.plural.rotaviruses
any of a group of wheel-shaped, RNA-contained viruses that cause gastroenteritis, especially in infants and newborn animals

Rumi, Jalaluddin.1207-1273. Born in Balkh, in what is now Afghanistan, part of the ancient Persian Empire, Rumi was a Sufi poet who reaches the heart of people with his poems:
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..."Love is the house of God and you are living in that house.(*).."

..."What was said to the rose that made it open was said to me here in my chest."
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..."Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all the barriers within yourself that you have built against it."

..."Let the lover be disgraceful, crazy, absentminded. Someone sober will worry about things going badly. Let the lover be."
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..."If you have been a passionate lover in life then you will be a passionate lover in death, a lover in the resurrection, a lover in Paradise, a lover forever."
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..."Lovers share a sacred decree to seek the Beloved. They roll head over heels, rushing toward the Beautiful One like a torrent of water."
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..."Out beyond ideas of right and wrong doing there is a field. I'll meet you there."
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..."You are the unconditioned spirit trapped in conditions."
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..."Everything in the universe is within you. Ask all from yourself."

..."You are the universe in ecstatic motion."
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..."Remember, the entrance door to the sanctuary is inside you."
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..."You split me and tore my heart open. You filled me with love. You poured your spirit into mine. I knew you as I know myself. My eyes are radiant with your light. My ears delight in your music. My nostrils are filled with your fragrance. My face is covered with your dew. You have made all things new. You have made me see all things shining. You have granted me perfect ease. I have become like Paradise."

..."The wound is the place where the light enters you."
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Rumi traveled with his family during his youth and eventually settled in Konya, in what is now Turkey. In 1244 he accepted the friendship and religious guidance of Shams al-Din, a dervish.(devotee of Sufism).from Tabrîz, Iran. Rumi hoped to devote his life to creating poetry expressing his feelings for his spiritual master. Shams al-Din disappeared unexplainedly in 1247 and over the years Rumi composed nearly 30,000 verses expressing his feelings at this loss. Later spiritual friendships again inspired his poetry, notably the epic poem Masnavi-ye Manavi.(Spiritual Couplets, mid-13th century), which had an enormous influence on Islamic literature and thought. Late in Rumi's life or possibly after his passing, his followers organized a Sufi sect called Mawlawiyah or Mevlevi, known in the West as the whirling or dancing, dervishes. Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

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