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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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passive
of, relating.to.or.being a verb form or voice used to indicate that the grammatical subject is the object of the action or the effect of the verb. For example, in the sentence 'They were impressed by his manner', were impressed is in the passive voice; a verb is in the passive voice when the SUBJECT of the SENTENCE is acted on by the verb,f or example in 'The ball was thrown by the pitcher', the ball (the subject) receives the action of the verb and was thrown is in the passive voice. The same sentence cast in the active voice would be 'The pitcher threw the ball'.

plural:-more than one

preposition.noun, plural.prepositions
a word that is used before a noun, pronoun or gerund to show place, time, direction etc.; in the phrase 'the trees in the park', 'in' is a preposition; a relation word that connects a noun, pronoun or noun phrase to another part of the sentence, such as in, as, for, with, to; preposition means 'a putting before'

English syntax allows and sometimes requires final placement of the preposition. Such placement is the only possible one in sentences such as 'We have much to be thankful for' or 'That depends on what you believe in'. 

Efforts to rewrite such sentences to place the preposition elsewhere will have comically stilted results; for example ('we have much for which to be thankful' or 'that depends on that in which you believe')

Even sticklers for the traditional rule (a preposition may not be used to end a sentence) can have no grounds for criticizing sentences such as 'I don't know where she will end up' or 'It's the most curious book I've ever run across'. In these examples, up and across are used as adverbs, not prepositions, as demonstrated by the ungrammaticality of sentences such as 'I don't know up where she will end' and 'It's the most curious book across which I have ever run'.
prepositional.adjective
relating to, composed of or used as a preposition
prepositionally.adverb

postposition.noun, plural.postpositions
Linguistics:.the placing of a word or suffixed element after the word to which it is grammatically related; a word or element placed postpositionally, as a preposition placed after its object postpositional.adjective
postpositionally.adverb

pron..abbreviation.for pronominal, pronoun, pronounced, and.pronunciation

pronominal.adjective; abbreviations.pron., pronom
Grammar:.of, relating.to.or.functioning as a pronoun; resembling a pronoun, as by specifying a person, place or thing, while functioning primarily as another part of speech ('his' in 'his choice' and 'enough' in 'they have enough' are pronominal adjectives)
pronominally.adverb

pronoun.noun.abbreviations.pron., pr..noun, plural.pronouns
one of a class of words that function as substitutes for nouns or noun phrases and designate persons or things asked for, previously specified or understood from the context.(for example, your name is a pronoun)

possessive pronoun.noun, plural.possessive pronouns
a possessive pronoun is one of several pronouns designating possession and capable of substituting; a possessive pronoun is a pronoun such as 'mine', 'yours' or 'theirs' which is used to refer to the thing of a particular kind that belongs to someone, as in Can I borrow your pen? I've lost mine; a possessive pronoun derives from a personal pronoun and denotes possession and analogous relationships

personal pronoun.noun, plural.personal pronouns
q personal pronoun is a pronoun such as 'I', 'you', 'she'/'he' or 'they' which is used to refer to the speaker or the person spoken to or to a person or thing whose identity is clear, usually because they have already been mentioned

reflexive pronoun.noun, plural.reflexive pronouns
of, relating.to.or.being a verb having an identical subject and direct object, as 'dressed' in the sentence 'She dressed herself'; of, relating to or being the pronoun used as the direct object of a reflexive verb, as 'herself' in 'She dressed herself'

relative pronoun.noun, plural.relative pronouns
Grammar:.a pronoun that introduces a relative.clause and has reference to an antecedent, as 'who' in 'the child who is wearing a hat' or 'that' in 'the house that you live in'

relative clause.noun, plural.relative clauses
Grammar:.a relative clause is a subordinate clause which specifies or gives information about a person or thing; relative clauses come after a noun or pronoun and in English, often begin with a relative pronoun such as 'who', which' or 'that'; a relative clause is a technical a part of a sentence that has a verb in it and is joined to the rest of the sentence by 'who', 'which', 'where' etc., for example the phrase 'who lives next door' in the sentence 'The man who lives next door is a doctor.'

clause.noun, plural.clauses
a group of words containing a subject and a predicate and forming part of a compound or complex sentence; a distinct article, stipulation, or provision in a document
clausal.adjective

comma.noun
a punctuation mark ( , ) used to indicate a separation of ideas or of elements within the structure of a sentence; a pause or separation; any of several butterflies of the genus Polygonia, having wings with brownish coloring and irregularly notched edges
substantive:.adjective designates a noun or noun equivalent; a word or group of words functioning as a noun; means 'self sufficient', 'independent', 'from'

synonym(s): a word having the same or nearly the same meaning in one or more senses as another in the same language, such as happy and joyful or admonish and reprove or Jacob and Israel
synonymous.adjective
having the same or a similar meaning (synonymous words); equivalent in connotation.(a widespread impression that Hollywood is synonymous with interesting productions; chickpeas are synonymous with garbanzos, same thing, different names)
synonymously.adverb

tense, tenses
any one of the inflected forms in the conjugation of a verb that indicates the time, such as perfect tense, past tense, present tense or future tense, as well as the continuance or completion of the action or state; a set of Greek tense forms

verb:.words which express.action, existence or occurrence, such as, take, be, appear; compare noun; a verb is a word such as 'sing', 'feel' or 'laugh' which is used with a subject to say what someone or something does or what happens to them, or to give information about them; a verb is a a word or group of words that describes an action, experience, or state, such as 'come', 'see', and 'put on'; there are other verbs also such as the ones below

...intransitive verb:-intransitive verbs take no direct object; not transferring their action and not used with an object to complete its meaning (he gave assent to the budget);
an.intransitive verb use.example is 'to become awake again'; compare transitive use, just below
intransitive, intransitiveness.nouns
intransitively.adverb

...transitive verb:-taking a direct object to complete its meaning by transferring the action to the object (the boss will speack with some workers tomorrow about it; he will provide his assent to the budget tomorrow); a.transitive verb use.example is 'to waken again'; compare intransitive use, just above
transitively.adverb
transitiveness.or.transitivity.noun

...linking verb
a linking verb is a verb which links the subject of a clause and a complement 'be', 'seem' and 'become' are linking verbs; a linking verb is a verb that connects the subject of a sentence with its  complement, for example 'seem' in the sentence 'the house seems big'; linking verbs are called copulas

...modal verb.also called an.auxiliary verb
a verb, such as 'have', 'can' or 'will', that accompanies the main verb in a clause and helps to make distinctions in mood, voice, aspect and tense; a modal verb is also called an auxiliary verb expressing necessity or possibility and all used with other verbs to express ideas such as possibility, permission or intention; modal/auxilary verbs are incomplete of themselves, demanding completion by addition of a main verb to properly express the ideas such as possibility, intention or necessity; some such words are 'may', 'must', 'shall', 'will', 'can', 'could', 'may', 'might', 'shall', 'should', 'will', 'would', 'ought to', 'used to', 'need', 'had better', 'dare'; other types of verbs

...phrasal verb

...reflexive verb
a reflexive verb is a transitive verb whose subject and object always refer to the same person or thing, so the object is always a reflexive pronoun, an example is 'to enjoy yourself', as in 'did you enjoy yourself?'

indicative mood:-of, relating to or being the mood of the verb used in ordinary objective statements; use...

subjunctive mood:-of, relating to or being a mood of a verb used in some languages for contingent or hypothetical action, action viewed subjectively or grammatically subordinate statements;-use...

imperative mood.adjective
of, relating.to.or.constituting the mood that expresses a command or request; use...
in grammar, a clause that is in the imperative or in the imperative mood, contains the base form of a verb and usually has no subject. Examples are 'Go away' and 'Please be careful'. Clauses of this kind are typically used to tell someone to do something
imperative mood.verb
the imperative mood; a verb form of the imperative mood

aspect
in grammar, a category of the verb designating primarily the relation of the action to the passage of time, especially in reference to completion, duration or repetition

voice
a property of verbs or a set of verb inflections indicating the relation between the subject and the action expressed by the verb ('birds build nests' uses the active voice; 'nests built by birds' uses the passive voice

double negative.noun
a grammatical construction that employs two negatives to express a single negation, but on the other hand, they are commonly used and work quite well; some are 'There's hardly any soup left'; double or multiple negatives are acceptably used when they combine to form an affirmative, such as in the sentence 'He cannot just do nothing', that is, 'he must do something'; improper is 'he didn't say nothing', meaning in Standard English 'he said nothing' or 'he didn't say anything'

preverb.noun
a prefix or particle preceding the root or stem of a verb, as 'for' in 'forget'
preverb.adjective

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