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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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clay.noun,.plural.clays
a fine-grained, firm earthy material that is plastic when wet and hardens when heated, consisting primarily of hydrated silicates of aluminum and widely used in making bricks, tiles and pottery; a hardening or nonhardening material having a consistency.similar to clay and used for modeling

cement.noun,.plural.cements
a building material made by grinding calcined limestone and clay to a fine powder, which can be mixed with water and poured to set as a solid mass or used as an ingredient in making mortar or concrete; a substance that hardens to act as an adhesive; glue; something that serves to bind or unite; Portland cement
cement, cemented, cementing, cements.verbs
transitive verb use.to bind with or as if with cement; to cover or coat with cement
intransitive verb use.to become cemented
cementer.noun,.plural.cementers

Portland cement
a hydraulic.cement made by heating a mixture of limestone and clay in a kiln and pulverizing the resulting material; after Portland, an urban district of southern England

concrete.adjective
of.or.relating.to an actual, specific.thing or instance; particular (concrete evidence global warming now deemed 'climate change' is a crock); existing in reality or in real experience; perceptible by the senses; real (concrete objects such as trees); of or relating to a material thing or group of things as opposed to an abstraction

concrete.noun,.plural.concretes
a hard, strong construction material consisting of sand, conglomerate gravel, pebbles, broken stone or slag in a mortar or cement.matrix
concrete, concreted, concreting, concretes.verbs
transitive verb use.to build, treat or cover with hard, strong conglomerate construction material; to form into a mass by coalescence or cohesion of particles or parts
intransitive verb use.to harden; solidify
concretely.adverb
concreteness.noun

concretion.noun,.plural.concretions
the act or process of concreting into a mass; coalescence; the state of having been concreted (a concretion of seminal.ideas in her treatise); a solid, hard mass; in geology, a rounded mass of mineral matter found in sedimentary rock; in pathology, a solid mass, usually composed of inorganic.material, formed in a cavity or tissue of the body; a calculus
concretionary.adjective

chronicle.noun,.plural.chronicles
an extended.account in prose or verse of historical.events, sometimes including.legendary.material, presented in chronological order; a detailed.narrative.record or report; the books of Chronicles in the Bible
chronicle, chronicled, chronicling, chronicles.transitive verbs
to record in or in the form of a historical record
chronicler.noun,.plural.chroniclers

chronology.noun,.plural.chronologies
deals with the determination of dates and the sequence of events; the arrangement of events in time; a chronological list or table
chronologist.noun

chronological.also.chronologic.adjective
arranged in order of time of occurrence; relating to or in accordance with chronology
chronologically.adverb

cheap, cheaper, cheapest.adjectives
relatively low in cost; inexpensive or comparatively inexpensive (nobody wants something 'cheap', but 'inexpensive' is nice, the connotation is better); of poor quality; inferior (a cheap toy); stingy; miserly
cheap, cheaper, cheapest.adverbs
inexpensively (got the new car cheap)
cheap at twice the price.idiom
extremely inexpensive
cheaply.adverb
(everything the factory produces is done cheaply, but people buy that junk)
cheapness.noun

captivate, captivated, captivating, captivates.transitive verbs
to attract and hold by charm, beauty or excellence
captivation, captivator.nouns
captor.noun,.plural.captors
one that takes another as a captive; you can refer to the person who has captured a person or animal as their captor
captivity.noun,.plural.captivities
the state or period of being imprisoned, confined or enslaved, such as ancient Israel and Judah's captivities or our own captivity from time to time, until we learn some things:.Job 42:10

captive.noun,.plural.captives
one held in the grip of a strong emotion or passion; one, such as a prisoner of war, that is forcibly confined, subjugated or enslaved
captive.adjective
taken and held prisoner, as in war; enslaved; in bondage (money formulas keep many in bondage to mediocrity); kept under restraint or control; confined (captive birds); restrained by circumstances that prevent free choice; enraptured, as by beauty; captivated

capture, captured, capturing, captures.transitive verbs
to take captive, as by force or craft; seize; to gain control of or possession, as in a game or contest (capture the queen in chess; captured the zeitgeist); to attract and hold (tales of adventure that capture the imagination); to succeed in preserving in lasting form (capture a likeness in a painting)
capture.noun
the act of catching, taking or winning, as by force or skill

culprit.noun,.plural.culprits
one charged with an offense or crime; one guilty of a fault or crime

conjoin, conjoined, conjoining, conjoins.transitive and intransitive verbs
to join or become joined together; unite
conjoiner.noun

conjoint.noun
joined together; combined (freedom and prosperity, the conjoint aims of mankind); of, consisting of or involving two or more combined or associated.entities; joint
conjointly.adverb

congest, congested, congesting, congests.verbs
transitive verb use.to overfill or overcrowd (trucks congested the tunnel); to cause the accumulation of excessive blood or tissue fluid in a vessel or an organ (he felt congested with the flu) intransitive verb use.to become congested
congestive.adverb
congestion.noun

case.noun,.plural.cases
a container; a receptacle (a jewelry case; put your computer in its case and let's go); a container with its contents; a protective covering or cover; the frame or framework of a window, door or stairway (a staircase)
case, cased, casing, cases.transitive verbs
to put into or cover with a case; encase

case.noun
an instance of something; an occurrence; an example: a case of mistaken identity; an occurrence of a disease or disorder (a mild case of detox often interpreted as flu); a set of circumstances or a state of affairs; a situation (it may rain, in which case the hike will be canceled); actual.fact; reality (we suspected the walls were hollow and this proved to be the case); a question or problem; a matter (it is simply a case of honor); in law, an action or a suit or just grounds for an action); the facts or evidence offered in support of a claim; a set of reasons or supporting facts; an argument (presented a good case for changing the law); a person or group of persons being assisted, treated or studied, as by a physician, lawyer or social worker (a case worker); a peculiar or eccentric person (this character was a real case of strangeness)
Linguistics:.the syntactic relationship of a noun, a pronoun or a determiner to the other words of a sentence, indicated by declensional endings, by the position of the words within the sentence, by prepositions or by postpositions; the form or position of a word that indicates this relationship; such forms, positions and relationships considered as a group; a pattern of inflection of nouns, pronouns and adjectives to express different syntactic functions in a sentence; the form of such an inflected word
case, cased, casing, cases.transitive verbs
to examine carefully, as in planning a crime (cased the bank before robbing it)
in any case.idiom
regardless of what has occurred or will occur; same as in any event
in case.idiom
if it happens that; if; as a precaution (took along an umbrella, just in case)
in case of.idiom
if there should happen to be; in case of; in the event of (a number to call in case of emergency)
in this case.idiom
regarding the particular.concern at the moment

civilized.adjective
showing evidence.of moral and intellectual.advancement; humane, ethical and reasonable (principled from the Bible he became an honest.upstanding person); having a highly developed society and culture; marked by refinement in taste and manners; cultured; polished.

civilize, civilized, civilizing,civilizes.transitive verbs
to raise from barbarism to an enlightened stage of development; bring out of a primitive or savage.state; to educate in matters of culture and refinement; make more polished or sophisticated
civilizable.adjective
civilizer.noun

civil.adjective
of, relating.to.or.befitting a citizen or citizens (civil duties of a town's mayor are many and varied); of or relating to citizens and their interrelations with one another (civil society); of ordinary citizens or ordinary community life; of or in accordance with organized society; civilized; sufficiently observing or befitting accepted social usages; not rude (gave aa civil reply); polite
civilly.adverb

civilization.noun
an advanced state of intellectual, cultural and material development in human society, marked by progress in the arts and sciences, the extensive use of writing; the type of culture and society developed by a particular nation or region or in a particular epoch (Mayan civilization; the civilization of ancient Egypt); the act or process of civilizing or reaching a civilized state; cultural or intellectual refinement; good taste; modern society with its conveniences (returned to civilization after camping in the mountains)

civic.adjective
of, relating.to.or.belonging to a city, a citizen or citizenship; municipal or civil; from Latin 'civicus' and from 'civis' meaning 'citizen'

casuistry.noun,.plural.casuistries
specious or excessively subtle reasoning intended to rationalize or mislead; casuistry is the use of clever.arguments to persuade or trick people; the use of clever but often false arguments to answer moral or legal questions; specious argument;  argumentation that is specious or excessively subtle and intended to be misleading; sophism; the equivocal determination of right and wrong in questions of conduct or conscience by the application of general principles of ethics
casuist.noun
a person who is expert in or given to casuistry
casuistic.also.casuistical.adjective
of or relating to casuists or casuistry
casuistically.adverb

collateral.adjective
of, relating.to.or.guaranteed by a security pledged against the performance of an obligation (a loan where you sign away your rights to something of value you have used as security to obtain money at interest that you have created by signature on a banking document); situated or running side by side; parallel; coinciding in tendency or effect; concomitant or accompanying; serving to support or corroborate (collateral information); of a secondary nature; subordinate (collateral target damage from wild carelessness)
collateral.noun
property acceptable as security for a loan or other obligation
collaterally.adverb
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