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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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consort.noun,.plural.consorts
a companion or partner; a partnership; a husband or wife; a spouse; a ship accompanying another in travel; an association (she governed the Parent Teacher Association in consort with parents as advisers); a group (a consort of fellow musicians; an ensemble of players); a group of instruments of the same family (the brass section of an orchestra)
consort, consorted, consorting, consorts.verbs
intransitive verb use.to keep company; associate (a musician who consorts with other musicians); to be in accord or agreement
transitive verb use.to unite in company; associate
consortium.noun,.plural.consortia.also.consortiums
an association or a combination, as of businesses, financial institutions or investors, for the purpose of engaging in a joint venture; a cooperative.arrangement among groups or institutions (a library consortium); in law, the right of a spouse to the company of, help of, affection of and sexual.relations with his or her mate
consortial.adjective

consanguineous.also.consanguine.adjective
of the same lineage or origin; having a common.ancestor
consanguineously.adverb
consanguinity.noun,.plural.consanguinities
relationship by blood as by one's forefathers or by a common ancestor; a close affinity or connection; the quality.or.state of being consanguineous; a close relation or connection; relationship by descent from a common ancestor; kinship

caulk, caulked, caulking, caulks.verbs
transitive verb use.to make watertight or airtight by filling or sealing (caulk a pipe joint; caulked the cracks between the boards with mud) in nautical terms, to make a boat watertight by packing seams with a waterproof material, such as oakum or pitch
intransitive verb use.to apply caulking (caulked all around the window frame)
caulking.noun,.plural.caulkings
a usually impermeable.substance used for caulking, also called caulking compound
caulker.noun,.plural.caulkers

William Cobbett.1763-1835. British journalist and social reformer. He wrote nearly 50 prose works, the most important being.Porcupine's Works 1801, comprising 12 volumes and.Rural Rides.written in 1830, which is a collection of essays showing deterioration of life in rural England brought about by the Industrial Revolution; Cobbett wrote about abuses in the army, which he experienced first hand as a soldier. He came to the U.S.A. to the city of Philadelphia in 1797. Here he established a newspaper, Porcupine's Gazette, in which he violently attacked American democracy. In England, he also founded Cobbett's Weekly Political Register in 1802. In this journal he became an advocate of radical.social and parliamentary.reform. He championed for the cause of various.oppressed.classes of British society. Cobbett was noted for his sarcasm and wit. His writiings refuted.opinions and doctrines of the controlling establishment. One of his quotes is."Tyranny has no enemy so formidable as the pen".

can.auxilary verb,.past tense.of word 'could'
used to indicate.physical or mental.ability (I can carry your  suitcase too: can you remember your first girlfriend?); used to indicate possession of a specified.power, right or privilege (people have power over their own affairs); used to indicate possession of a specified capability or skill (competent writers can weave a story around the simplest of subjects; she can both run and jump high); used to indicate possibility or probability (I wonder if I should get a large dog or a tiny one; things can and do happen by chance:.Ecclesiastes 9:1 "...the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, neither yet bread to the wise, nor yet riches to men of understanding, nor yet favour to men of skill, but time and chance happeneth to them all."); used to indicate that which is permitted, as by conscience or feelings (she permits herself the enjoyment of living in the country cabin in the summer)

could.auxilary verb,.past tense.of word 'can'
used to indicate.ability, possibility or permission in the past (I could run faster then; it could be no better at that time; only men could go to the club in those days); used with hypothetical or conditional.force (if we could help, we would); used to indicate tentativeness or politeness (I could be wrong; could you come over here?)
Usage note:.generations of grammarians and schoolteachers have insisted that the word 'can' should be used only to express the capacity to do something and that the word 'may' must be used to express permission. Technically, correct usage therefore requires 'The supervisor said that anyone who wants an extra day off 'may' (not 'can') have one or 'May' (not 'can') I take another week to submit the application?'
   The blurring of the line between 'can' and 'may' is socially and historically inevitable, since politeness often makes the use of 'can' preferable in the permission sense. For example, the sentence 'You can borrow my car if you like' is a more gracious offer than 'You may borrow my car'; the first presumes the granting of permission, while the second makes a point of it. So, use 'can' or 'may' as seems right to you in any particular interaction of communation. 
   'May I leave the room?' requires the pupil to distinguish explicitly between what is possible and what is allowed, a difference not always apparent to younger children. And even in later life, observance of the distinction is often advisable in the interests of clarity. Thus, the sentence 'Students can take no more than three courses allows the possibility that a student who is unusually capable may take more, whereas 'Students may take no more than three courses does not'. See more Usage notes

can.noun,.plural.cans
a usually cylindrical metal container; an airtight container, usually made of tin-coated iron, in which foods or beverages are preserved; the contents of such a container (a can of beans)
can, canned, canning, cans.transitive verbs
to seal in an airtight container for future use; preserve (canning peaches); to make a recording of (can the audience's applause for a TV comedy show for later use); to dismiss from employment or school; to put a stop to; quit (let's can the chatter)
canner.noun,.plural.canners

carcass.noun,.plural.carcasses, anciently.spelt.carcase
the dead body of an animal, especially one slaughtered for food; the body of a human being; body; remains from which the substance or character is gone (the carcass of a once glorious.empire, such as Babylonia); framework or basic.structure (the carcass of a burned out building)

contain, contained, containing, contains.transitive verbs
to have within; hold; to be capable of holding; to have as component parts; include or comprise (the album contains many memorable songs); to hold or keep within limits; restrain (I could hardly contain my curiosity); to halt the spread or development of; check (the U.S. Corp of Engineers were remiss in their efforts to restrain ocean waters due to hurricane Katrina ...levees.org); to check the expansion or influence of by containment
containable.adjective

containment.noun,.plural.containments
the act or condition of containing; a structure or system designed to prevent the accidental release of radioactive materials from a reactor

container.noun,.plural.containers
a receptacle, such as a carton, can or jar, in which material is held or carried; a large reusable receptacle that can accommodate smaller cartons or cases in a single shipment, designed for efficient handling of cargo

containerize, containerized, containerizing, containerizes.verbs
transitive verb use.to package cargo in large standardized.containers for efficient shipping and handling; to adapt an industry or shipping operation to the use of such containers
intransitive verb use.to convert to the use of containerized cargo containerization.noun

cargo.noun,.plural.cargos.also spelt.cargoes
the freight carried by a ship, an aircraft or another vehicle

cereal.noun,.plural.cereals
a grass such as barley, wheat, oats or corn, the starchy grains of which are used as food; the grain of such a grass (cereal grains); any of several other plants or their edible seed or fruit, such as buckwheat or grain amaranth; a food such as granola prepared from any of these plants, generally used for breakfast food; commercially.processed grain such as corn flakes
cereal.adjective
consisting of or relating to grain or to a plant producing grain

commission.noun,.plural.commissions
the act of granting.certain powers or the authority to carry out a particular.task or duty; if you commission something or commission someone to do something, you arrange for someone to do a piece of work for you (the Ministry of Agriculture commissioned a study into low-input farming (you can commission them to paint something especially for you); the authority so granted; the matter or task so authorized (the commission of those in public service is to serve the public; the new ship is ready to be put into commission); a document.conferring such authorization; a group of people authorized to perform certain duties or functions (a trade commission from China is going to England to discuss matters of trade); a fee or percentage allowed to a sales representative or an agent for services.rendered (the accumulated commissions on her sales throughout the year amounted to her receiving a plaque and a large amount of money); a document issued by a government, conferring on the recipient the rank of a commissioned officer in the armed forces; the rank and powers so conferred
commission, commissioned, commissioning, commissions.transitive verbs
to grant a commission to; to authorize; to place an order for (commissioned a new symphony for the festival); to put a ship into active service
in commission.idiom
in active service, used of a ship; in use or in usable.condition
on commission.idiom
with a sales commission serving as full or partial.recompense for the work done (she sells boats on commission); with the sanction of the authority commanding (the ship was commissioned to abide at the foreign port)
out of commission.idiom
not in active service, used of a ship, vehicle or machine (the old printing press is now out of commission); not in use or in working condition
commissional.adjective
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