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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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just.adverb
precisely; exactly (just enough salt; I've waited just enough time to get tired); only a moment ago (he just arrived; by a narrow margin; barely (just missed being hit with the ball; just caught the bus before it pulled away); at a little distance (just down the road); merely; only (just a scratch; he was just like his predecessor); simply; certainly (the flowers in the summer are just beautiful); perhaps; possibly (I just may go); you use 'just' to say that something happened a very short time ago or is starting to happen at the present time, for example, if you say that someone has just arrived, you mean that they arrived a very short time ago (they have just bought a new house; the two had only just met; she just had the most amazing dream; we're only just beginning to take in what was presented at the meeting); if you say that you are just doing something, you mean that you are doing it now and will finish it very soon; if you say that you are just about to do something or just going to do it, you mean that you will do it very soon (I'm just making the sauce for the cauliflower; I'm just going to walk down the lane now and post some letters); if you say that you can just see or hear something, you mean that it is easy for you to imagine seeing or hearing it; you use just to emphasize how small an amount is or how short a length of time is (Stephanie and David redecorated a room in just three days); you use just to indicate that what you are saying is the case, but only by a very small degree or amount (her hand was just visible by the light from the sitting room; I arrived just in time for my flight to London); you use 'just' in expressions such as just a minute and just a moment to ask someone to wait for a short time
just about.idiom
almost; very nearly (this job is just about done)
just as.adverb
at the same time as (he could lift heavier items just as if they were a feather; the building collapsed just as he arrived); even as; as if, so to speak, as it were, as if it were
just now.idiom
only a moment ago
justly.adverb
justness.noun

just.adjective
honorable and fair in one's dealings and actions (a just ruler); fair; consistent with what is morally right; just stresses.conformity with what is legally.or.ethically.right or proper (a kind and just man;."a just and lasting peace"....Abraham Lincoln); righteous (a just cause); properly due or merited (just deserts); valid within the law; lawful (just claims); suitable or proper in nature; fitting (a just touch of solemnity); based on fact or sound.reason; well founded (a just appraisal); if you describe a situation, action or idea as just, you mean that it is right or acceptable according to particular.moral.principles, such as respect for all human beings (in a just society there must be a system whereby people can seek redress through the courts; no government can justly claim authority unless it is based on, accurately reflects and never deviates from the will of the people)

justice.noun
justice is the restoring of order to the state before disorder (some people say 'I hope he gets justice done to him', meaning not justice at all, but revenge, which only furthers.chaos); the quality of being just; fairness; justice is rendering to every one that which is his due for actions oh harm creating negativity; justice has been distinguished from equity in this respect, that while justice means merely the doing what positive law demands, equity means the doing of what is fair and right in every separate case, hence we often are reminded of the picture of a scale in a balance position); the principle of moral rightness; equity; conformity to moral rightness in action or attitude; righteousness; the upholding of what is just, especially fair treatment and due reward in accordance with honor, standards or law; the administration and procedure of law (anciently in the Old Testament there was no class exactly corresponding to lawyers of today; anyone accused stood side by side before the judge with their witnesses and pleaded their own cause; those called lawyers in the New Testament, such as in Luke 7:30, were those who were supposed to know the still in effect Mosaic Law and its application); conformity to truth, fact or sound.reason (the biased law court deals in a lack of justice); a judge; a justice of the peace
do justice to.idiom
to treat adequately, fairly or with full appreciation (the subject is so complex that I cannot do justice to it in a short time)

justification.noun,.plural.justifications
the state, condition or fact of being justified by the Creator:.Matthew 12:37; the act of justifying; something, such as a fact or circumstance, that justifies (some shortsighted individuals consider misgovernment to be a justification for revolution and/or wars, rather than contribute to solutions.benefiting all)

justify, justified, justifying, justifies.verbs
to prove or show to be just, right; made righteous because of a gift; to give an acceptable explanation for something that other people may think is unreasonable (people in both corporate and governmental worlds often justify actions to hide intentions of greed and deceit)
transitive verb use.to demonstrate or prove to be just, right or valid (justified each budgetary expense as necessary); anger that is justified by the circumstances; to declare free of blame; absolve; to free a human being of the guilt and penalty attached to sin; jusification

justifiable.adjective
having sufficient.grounds for justification; possible to justify (justifiable resentment)
justifiably.adverb
justifiability.or.justifiableness.noun

judge, judged, judging, judges.verbs
transitive verb use.to form an opinion or estimation of after careful consideration.(judge heights; judging character); decision making; to hear and decide on; try (judge a case); to act as one appointed to decide the winners of (judge an essay contest); to determine or declare after consideration or deliberation; to have as an opinion or assumption; suppose (I judge you're right)
Bible:.to govern; rule (used of an ancient.Israelite leader, the Book of Judges; the subject of Judgment)
intransitive verb use.to form an opinion or evaluation; to act or decide as a judge
judge.noun,.plural.judges
one who judges; one who makes estimates as to worth, quality, or fitness (a good judge of used cars; a poor judge of character); a public official who hears and decides cases brought before a court of law; one appointed to decide the winners of a contest or competition
Bible:.a leader of the Israelites during a period of about 400 years between the death of Joshua and the accession of Saul

judicial.adjective
in law, of, relating.to.or.that which is proper to courts of law or to the administration of justice (the judicial system); characterized by or expressing.judgment
judicially.adverb

judiciary.noun,.plural.judiciaries
the judicial.branch of government; a system of courts of law for the administration of justice; the judges of these courts

judgment.also.judgement.noun,.plural.judgments also judgements
the act or process of judging; decision making; the formation of an opinion after consideration or deliberation; the mental ability to perceive and distinguish relationships; making a decision; discernment.(fatigue may affect a pilot's judgment of distances); the capacity to form an opinion by distinguishing and evaluating (his judgment of fine music is impeccable); the capacity to assess situations or circumstances and draw sound.conclusions; conducting one's life with wisdom; good sense, commonsense (she showed good judgment in not dating that character); reason; an opinion or estimate formed after consideration or deliberation

judgmental.adjective
of, relating.to.or.involving judgment; characterized by a tendency to judge harshly
judgmentally.adverb

jealous.adjective
feeling, pining or showing unhappiness due to a feeling of loss or potential loss or anger, because you think that someone you love, such as your partner, likes or is liked by someone else and you might lose that person's affection you cherish.(a jealous woman; she became very jealous whenever he talked to other women; God was jealous over those who were on His side); vigilant in guarding a possession (new colonies were jealous of their new independence); very concerned about protecting or keeping something (she was jealous of her own good reputation; he has always been very jealous of his privacy); possessive in a precautionary way; concerned for; protective about; watchful over; conscious of; proud of; mindful about; zealous in maintaining or guarding to keep safe; fearful or wary of being supplanted.(*); apprehensive of losing affection, attention or position; envious.(jealous of the success of others); inclined to suspect rivalry; suspicious of a supposed competitor; having to do with or arising from feelings of envy, apprehension or bitterness (jealous thoughts); intolerant of rivalry or unfaithfulness; feeling or showing an unhappy or angry desire to have what someone else has (success has made some of his old friends jealous); provoked to rivalry; disposed to suspect rivalry or unfaithfulness; hostile toward a rival or one believed to enjoy an advantage (an example)
jealously.adverb
jealousness.noun
jealousy.noun,.plural.jealousies
a jealous attitude or disposition; example

junction.noun
the actor process of joining or the condition of being joined; a place where two things join or meet, especially a place where two roads or railway routes come together and one terminates
junctional.adjective

juncture.noun
joint, connection

joint venture
a legal entity or other organization that results from a contractual arrangement and is owned, operated or governed by two or more participants as a separate and specific activity subject to joint control, in which the participants retain either an ongoing financial interest or an ongoing financial responsibility

jeer, jeered, jeering, jeers.verbs
to make fun of a person or thing in a rude-sarcastic manner; a jeering remark; sarcastic or derisive comment
intransitive use.to speak or shout derisively; mock
transitive use.to abuse vocally; taunt.(jeered the speaker off the stage)
jeer.noun
a scoffing or taunting remark or shout
jeeringly.adverb
jeerer.noun

jargon.noun
a somewhat.derogatory term implying.unintelligibility.regarding the specialized vocabulary and idioms of those in the same work, way of life, etc., as social work, scientific pursuits, etc.; argot

Josephus, Flavius, 37-100 A.D.
Jewish general and historian, born in Jerusalem of both royal and priestly lineage, who took part in the Jewish revolt against the Romans. Josephus was commissioned to write a comprehensive History of the Jews for the Romans. Josephus wrote some absorbing eye witness information regarding the New Testament and the destruction of Jerusalem in his historical records such as the cruelty of the Roman emperor Titus. He was a Jewish priest who served his turn in the temple and he became one of the top ten Jewish generals in the war against Rome. He was captured early in the war, but because of his prediction that Vespasian would become emperor, was allowed to travel with the Romans and record the history of the war. His information is valuable because he was a Jewish eyewitness, writing for both Jewish and Roman readers and therefore forced to be as accurate and objective as possible. He drew upon past writers from around the Mediterranean and Middle Eastern world in the course of his research.

His History of the Jews is the major source of information about the siege of Masada, an ancient mountaintop fortress in southeast Israel on the southwest shore of the Dead Sea). In 73 A.D., after a two year siege, members of the Zealot Jewish sect committed mass suicide rather than surrender to the Romans)

"His works include:.The Jewish War.(in 7 books), which he wrote to dissuade his people and other nations from courting annihilation by further revolt against an all powerful Rome; Jewish Antiquities.(The Antiquities of the Jews.in 20 books), which is a history of the Jews from the creation to 66 A.D. that eloquently demonstrates how his people had flourished under the law of God in spite of themselves; an autobiography,.Life.and.Against Apion, a refutation of charges against the Jews made by the anti Semitic Greek grammarian Apion.(flourished 1st century).and other likeminded writers. The last named is invaluable, because Josephusrecapitulates writings on Jewish history that are no longer extant."...comprised with Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99..(Josephus works, free download)

Josephus presents us with ancient Jewish history and life in Roman occupied Palestine, approximately one generation after the life of Emmanuel the Christ. As a personal friend of the newly inaugurated Roman emperor Flavius, Josephus moved to Rome where he had access to the scholars and libraries of the Roman Empire, even as his own people were being beaten down, enslaved and harshly dispersed by Roman armies. This was the time of Masada, of the Dead Sea Scrolls and of the rapid explosion of the early Christian church. Josephus comments that the conflict with Rome in 70 A.D. was the "Revolution of the Ages", meaning the changing into another age.

If you would like the works of Josephus download it free with the Online Bible.

Andrew Johnson
became the 17th U.S. president when Abraham Lincoln was assassinated in April 1865
 
 
 
 

Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

joule.noun,.plural.joules
the International System unit of electrical, mechanical and thermal energy; a unit of electrical energy equal to the work done when a current of 1 ampere is passed through a resistance of 1 ohm for 1 second; a unit of energy equal to the work done when a force of 1 newton acts through a distance of 1 meter (named after James Prescott Joule, 1818-1889, British physicist who established the mechanical theory of heat and discovered the first law of thermodynamics)

jaunty, jauntier, jauntiest.adjective
having a buoyant or self-confident air; brisk; crisp and dapper in appearance; natty
jauntily-adverb
jauntiness-noun

John of Salisbury, 1115?-1180
English bishop and scholar who wrote biographies of Becket and Anselm and treatises on diplomacy, logic and Aristotelian.philosophy

jurisdiction.noun,.plural.jurisdictions
Law:.the right and power to interpret and apply the law (courts having jurisdiction in this district); the territorial range of authority or control; authority or control (islands under U.S. jurisdiction; a bureau with jurisdiction over Native American affairs); the extent of authority or control (a family matter beyond the school's jurisdiction)
jurisdictionally-adverb
jurisdictional.adjective

juxtapose, juxtaposed, juxtaposing, juxtaposes.transitive verbs
to place side by side, especially for comparison or contrast

jerk, jerked, jerking, jerks.verbs
transitive verb use.to give a sudden quick thrust, push, pull or twist to; to throw or toss with a quick abrupt motion
intransitive verb use.to move in sudden abrupt motions; jolt(the train jerked ahead); to make spasmodic motions (my legs jerked from fatigue)
jerk.noun,.plural.jerks
a sudden abrupt motion, such as a yank or twist; a jolting or lurching motion; jerks are involuntary convulsive twitching often resulting from excitement
jerkingly.adverb
jerker.noun

jerk.noun,.plural.jerks
a person presently unable to 'get it all together' and therefore relies on phoniness as a crutch, because he or she has seemingly been bypassed by lessons of life others have learned; one who lacks the smarts in people skills; a dull, stupid or fatuous person; a sudden abrupt motion, such as a yank or twist; a jolting or lurching motion
jerkingly.adverb
jerker.noun

jerky, jerkier, jerkiest.adjective
foolish; silly; a jerk; a fatuous person (his jerky ideas about how to live life show in his demeanor); characterized by jerks or jerking (a jerky bus ride)
jerkily.adverb
jerkiness.noun

jump the gun.idiom
to start doing something too soon

jigsaw puzzle.noun,.plural.jigsaw puzzles
a puzzle consisting of a mass of irregularly shaped pieces of cardboard, plastic or wood that form a picture when fitted together; also called picture puzzle

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