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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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furnace.noun,.plural.furnaces
an enclosed large container for a very hot fire, used to produce heat for home and liquid metal in industries needing such a product; date: 1200-1300 from Old French word 'fornaise' (many houses in colder climates in the wintertime have a furnace to provide heat)

finance.noun,.plural.finances
the money you have available and the way that you'll manage it
finance, financed, financing, finances.transitive verbs
to provide or raise the funds for (avoided financing large expenditures, instead, waiting till he had enough saved to make a purchase)
financeable.adjective
word 'finance' is from Middle English 'finaunce' meaning settlement and from Old French 'finance' meaning 'payment' and from 'finer' meaning 'to pay ransom'
financial.adjective
of, relating.to.or.involving finance, finances or financiers who loan money and attach a load factor to it, so in addition to the amount one may want to borrow, they are obligated to pay an increased amount, usually calculated using a percentage of the original amount (you borrow $100., to which is added, say, 10% and you now owe $110)
financially.adverb

fetch, fetched, fetching, fetches.verbs
transitive verb use.to come or go after and take or bring back (the puppy fetched the stick that we had tossed); to bring in as a price (fetched a few hundred dollars at the garage sale)
intransitive verb use.to go after something and return with it; to retrieve (fetched the sleeping bag stored in the garage)
fetcher.noun,.plural.fetchers
fetch.noun,.plural.fetches
the act or an instance of fetching
Computers:.in computers, a program.routine that brings a module of a program from storage into main memory for immediate use;
word 'fetch' is from Middle English 'fecchen' which is from Old English 'feccean'

faux pas.noun,.plural.also faux pas
a social.blunder; from French 'faux' meaning 'false' and 'pas' meaning step

fleck.noun,.plural.flecks
a tiny.mark.or.spot (flecks of mica in the rock); a small bit or flake (flecks of dust floating in the air; a fleck of toast on one's shirt)
fleck, flecked, flecking, flecks.transitive verbs
to spot or streak (the path was flecked with sunlight); probably from Middle English 'flekked' meaning 'spotted' and akin to Old Norse 'flekkr' meaning 'spot'

franchise.noun,.plural.franchises
a franchise is permission given by an organization to someone who wants to sell its goods or services (fast-food franchises; a franchise holder; a franchise agreement); under franchise (beer is brewed in other countries under franchise)
franchise, franchised, franchising, franchises.transitive verbs
to grant a franchise to; from date 1300-1400 A.D..Old French 'franchir' meaning 'to set free', from French word 'franc'
franchisee.noun,.plural.franchisees
one that is granted a franchise, as to market a company's goods or services in a certain local area
franchiser.or.franchisor.noun,.plural.franchisers.or.franchisors
one that grants a franchise

feisty, feistier, feistiest.adjectives
full of spirit; frisky or spunky; touchy; quarrelsome
feistiness.noun

fuselage.noun,.plural.fuselages
the central body of an aircraft, to which the wings and tail assembly are attached and which accommodates the crew, passengers and cargo; from French 'fuselé' meaning 'spindle-shaped', from Old French 'fusel' meaning 'spindle'

fair, fairer, fairest.adjectives
of pleasing appearance, especially because of a pure or fresh quality; comely; light in color, especially blond (fair hair); of light complexion (fair skin); free of clouds or storms; a clear and sunny day (fair skies); free of blemishes or stains; clean and pure (one's fair name)
fair.noun,.plural.fairs
a beautiful woman; loveliness; Middle English, from Old English 'fæger' meaning 'lovely', 'pleasant'
fairness.noun

fair, fairer, fairest.adjectives
having or exhibiting a disposition that is free of favoritism, self-interest or bias in judgment; impartial (a fair referee; a fair mediator; a fair deal; on a fair footing); just to all parties; equitable (a compromise that is fair to both sides); being in accordance with relative.merit or significance (she wanted to receive her fair share of the proceeds); consistent with rules, logic or ethics (a fair assumption)
fairness.noun
fair.adverb
in a proper or legal.manner (playing fair)

fairly.adverb
in a fair or just.manner; equitably; legitimately; suitably; moderately; rather (a fairly good dinner); more than a little; quite (they'll have quite a lot of food for the upcoming bar-b-que; the house had a fairly large garden; she speaks English fairly well; the instructions seemed fairly straightforward); to a reasonable.degree (I was fairly sure that I would go to the party)

fair, fairer, fairest.adjectives
moderately.good; mildly.satisfying (gave only a fair performance of the sonata); average; superficially true or appealing
fairness.noun
fair game.idiom
lawful to hunt or attack

fair, faired, fairing, fairs.transitive verbs
to join pieces so as to be smooth, even or regular (faired the aircraft's wing into the fuselage)
fair and square.phrasal verb
just and honest
for fair.phrasal verb
to the greatest or fullest extent possible (our team was beaten for fair in that tournament)
no fair.phrasal verb
something contrary to the rules (was upset, threw the ball at the batter and that was no fair)

fair.noun,.plural.fairs
a gathering held at a specified time and place for the buying and selling of goods; a market; an exhibition, as of farm products or manufactured goods, usually accompanied by various competitions and entertainments (a state fair); an exhibition intended to inform people about a product or business opportunity (a computer fair; a job fair); an event, usually for the benefit of a charity or public institution, including entertainment and the sale of goods; a bazaar (a church fair)

flight.noun,.plural.flights
an act or instance of fleeing or running away from something; rout; to retreat; run away; the motion of an object in or through a medium, such as.through the Earth's atmosphere or through space beyond it; an instance of such motion (flight of an arrow); the distance covered in such motion is also called a flight; the act or process of flying through the air by means of wings; a group of birds or aircraft, flying together can be called a flight (a flight of famous Canada Geese); flock; the ability to fly; an airline run or trip (they could have driven the car the 100 miles, but instead took a run up there on a plane); the act, principles or technique of flying an airplane (flight training); stairs rising from one landing to another (in the same apartment building our friends moved in two flights up from us)
flight, flighted, flighting,flights.intransitive verbs
to migrate or fly in flocks

flighty, flightier, flightiest.adjective
given to capricious or unstable behavior; characterized by irresponsible or silly behavior; easily excited; skittish
flightily.adverb
flightiness.noun

fly, flew, flown, flying, flies.verbs
intransitive verb use.to engage in flight; to rise in or be carried through the air by the wind (a kite flying above the playground);
transitive verb use.to cause to fly or float in the air (fly a kite; fly a flag); to flee or run from (seeing the bear we flew the campground); to avoid; shun
fly.noun,.plural.flies
the act of flying; flight; a fold of cloth that covers a fastening of a garment, such as on the front of trousers; a flap that covers an entrance or forms a rooflike extension for a tent or the canopy of a vehicle; the span of a flag from the staff to the outer edge
flyable.adjective
fly at.phrasal verb
to fiercely attack; assault
fly high.idiom
to be elated (the team was flying high after their win)
fly off the handle.idiom
to become suddenly enraged (flew off the handle when the train was finally canceled)

fly.noun,.plural.flies
any of numerous two-winged insects of the order Diptera, especially any of the family Muscidae, which includes the housefly; a fishing lure.simulating a fly, made by attaching materials such as feathers, tinsel and colored thread to a fishhook
fly in the ointment.idiom
a detrimental.circumstance or detail (Ecclesiastes 10:1); a drawback
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