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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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abbreviation.noun,.plural.abbreviations (also Abbr. abbr., abbrev)
an abbreviation is a short form of a word or phrase, made by leaving out some of the letters or by using only the first letter of each word (the postal abbreviation for Kansas is KS); the act or product of shortening; a shortened form of a word or phrase used chiefly in writing to represent the complete form, such as Mass. for Massachusetts or USMC for United States Marine Corps

article.noun
Grammar:.any of a class of words used to signal nouns and to specify their application; in English, the indefinite articles are a and an and the definite article is the

attributive, attributiveness.nouns
a word or word group, such as an adjective, that is placed adjacent to the noun it modifies without a linking verb; for example 'pale' in 'the pale girl' or 'display' in 'the display cabinet'
attributive.adjective
of, relating to or being an attributive, as an adjective; of or having the nature of an attribution or attribute
attributively.adverb

colloquial.adjective
characteristic of or appropriate to the spoken language or to writing, where it is assumed the other person comprehends or would be somewhat interested in comprehending, the informal word(s) used in a colloquialism; colloquial words and phrases are used mainly in conversation (a colloquial expression, such as the people who write parking tickets in New York are known colloquially as 'brownies'; turning food into 'frankenfood')
colloquia, colloquialness.noun
colloquially.adverb
colloquialism.noun
colloquial style or quality; a colloquial expression

inflect, inflected, inflecting, inflects.verbs
Grammar:.
transitive verb use.to alter a word by inflection
intransitive verb use.to be modified by inflection; to give all of the inflected forms of a word; to provide a paradigm
inflective.adjective
inflector.noun,.plural.inflectors
inflection.noun,.plural.inflections
an alternation of the form of a word by adding affixes, as in English dogs from dog or by changing the form of a base, as in English spoke from speak, that indicates grammatical features such as number, person, mood or tense; the paradigm of a word; a pattern of forming paradigms, such as noun inflection or verb inflection
inflectionally.adverb
inflectional.adjective

linguistics.noun
the science of language including phonology (speech sounds; phonetics), morphology (internal structure of words), syntax and semantics.
linguistically.adverb
linguistic.adjective
linguist.noun
a specialist in linguistics; polyglot; a person who can speak, read and write several languages

semantic also semantical.adjective
the study of meaning in forms of language; dealing with the nature, structure, development and changes of the meanings of speech forms); of or relating to meaning, especially meaning in language; of, relating to or according to the science of semantics
semantically.adverb
semantics.noun
Linguistics:.the study or science of meaning in language forms Logic:.the study of relationships between signs and symbols and what they represent; in this sense, also called semasiology

mood.noun
Grammar:-a set of verb forms or inflections used to indicate the speaker's attitude toward the factuality or likelihood of the action or condition expressed. In English the indicative mood is used to make factual statements, the subjunctive mood to indicate doubt or unlikelihood, and the imperative mood to express a command

direct object.noun
in English and some other languages, the word or phrase in a sentence referring to the person or thing receiving the action of a transitive verb For example, in 'mail the letter and call him', letter and him are direct objects

object.noun
Grammar:-a noun or substantive that receives or is affected by the action of a verb within a sentence; a noun or substantive following and governed by a preposition

interjection.noun
a sudden, short utterance; a part of speech usually expressing emotion and capable of standing alone, such as Ugh! or Wow!
interjectional.adjective
interjectionally.adverb

past tense.noun
a verb tense used to express an action or a condition that occurred in or during the past, for example, in 'while she was sewing, he read aloud', 'was sewing' and 'read' are in the past tense

perfect tense.noun
a tense of verbs used in describing action that has been completed

present perfect tense.noun
the verb tense expressing action completed at the present time, formed in English by combining the present tense of have with a past participle, as in He has spoken; a verb in the present perfect tense

present tense.noun
the verb tense expressing action in the present time, as in 'She writes'; 'she is writing', similar.in effect to the Greek perfect tense

future tense
a verb tense expressing future time, as in 'She plans to write the note after she has coffee'

phrasal verb.noun
an English verb complex consisting of a verb and one or more following particles and acting as a complete syntactic and semantic unit, as 'look up' in (she looked up the word in the dictionary) or (she looked the word up in the dictionary) or 'make sense of'

sentence.noun,.plural.sentences
a sentence is a group of words which, when they are written down, begin with a capital letter, such as A, B, C, etc. and end with a full stop, being a period  .   or question mark   ?   or exclamation mark   ! 
Most sentences contain a subject and a verb
...period
...question mark.a question mark is the punctuation mark   ? which is used in writing at the end of a question; he mark ? that is used at the end of a question in a sentence; a mark   ?   used in writing and printing at the conclusion of a sentence to indicate a direct question, such as How did you come to that conclusion? and Are you going to wear that dress to the wedding? and Why is the car making that strange noise?
...exclamation mark

syntax.noun
the arrangement of words as elements in a sentence to show their relationship; sentence structure; the study of the rules whereby words or other elements of sentence structure are combined to form grammatical sentences; the pattern of formation of sentences or phrases in a language; such a pattern in a particular sentence or discourse; a systematic, orderly arrangement; to put in order

syntactic.or.syntactical.adjective
of or relating to the rules of syntax; conforming to accepted patterns of syntax
syntactically.adverb

nominative.adjective
Grammar: in the grammar of some languages, the nominative or the nominative case is the case used for a noun when it is the subject of a verb, as 'I' in 'I wrote the letter'; compare accusative

predicate nominative.noun
Grammar: a noun or pronoun that follows a linking verb and refers to the same person or thing as the subject of the verb

gerund.noun
a gerund is a noun formed from a verb which refers to an action, process or state; in English, gerunds end in '-ing', for example 'running', 'thinking' and 'singing'; a gerund has all case forms except the nominative
gerundial.adjective

accusative.adjective
of, relating.to.or.being the case of a noun, pronoun, adjective or participle that is the direct object of a verb or the object of certain prepositions
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