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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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brilliance, brilliancy.nouns
great brightness or radiance; saturated with brightness; giving forth and reflecting intense brightness, hope and/or happiness, etc. (a musician who shows forth brilliance of performance); you can say that something is brilliant when you are very pleased about it or think that it is very good; shining brightly; keenly intelligent; sparkling beauty; very able
brilliant.adjective
a brilliant being, idea or performance is one that is extremely clever or sklllful (she had a brilliant mind)
brilliantly.adverb
brilliantness.noun

bromine.noun
a heavy, volatile, corrosive, reddish brown, nonmetallic liquid.element, having a highly irritating.vapor, used in producing gasoline antiknock mixtures, fumigants, dyes and photographic chemicals and used in the treatment of flour as an 'improver' as it's an oxidizing.substance and enables the baking of larger loaves of bread (she's having a slice of chemical bread); although such so-called improvers and the bleaching.agents used to rectify yellowness in flour are permitted in most countries, the processes are not universal; 'improvers' include bromates, chlorine dioxide in gaseous form and the chemical concoction azodicarbonamide, with the most popular bleacher used being benzoyl peroxide; Atomic weight 79.904; atomic number 35; melting point 7.2°C; boiling point 58.78°C; valence 1, 3, 5, 7.
bromate.noun,.plural.bromates
a salt of bromic acid; an ion of bromic acid, BrO3
bromate, bromated, bromating, bromates.transitive verbs
to treat a substance.chemically with a bromate
bromic acid.noun
a corrosive, colorless liquid, HBrO3, used in making dyes and pharmaceuticals

browser.noun,.plural.browsers
a piece of computer software that you use to search for information on the Internet, especially on the World Wide Web;
a browser is someone who browses in a shop; 
browse, browses, browsed, browsing.verbs
to casually look through or over; to inspect something in a leisurely and casual way (browsed through the record collection for items of interest); to read something superficially by selecting passages at random (browsed through the report during lunch); skim
intransitive verb use.to skim through a book reading at random passages that catch the eye; to cursorily look over or through; to inspect.something in a leisurely and casual.way (browsed through the record collection for items of interest); an aggregate of things casually examined, especially in search of something of interest
transitive verb use.to look through or over (something) casually browsed the evening paper; browsing the gift shops)

bulimia-(also called bulimarexi and bulimia nervosa)-noun
also called binge purge syndrome, binge vomit syndrome
insatiable appetite; an eating disorder common among young women of normal or nearly normal weight that is characterized by episodic, uncontrolled excessive food intake, followed by feelings of guilt, depression and self-condemnation; bulimia is often associated with measures taken to prevent weight gain, such as dieting or fasting and in this sense, also called binge eating syndrome
bulimic.adjective and noun

byword.noun,.plural.bywords
someone or something that is a byword for a particular.quality is well known for having that quality (the Rolls-Royce brand name is a byword for quality; Phoenix is a byword for heat in that city in the summer in Arizona); a byword is a word or phrase which people often use; a familiar saying (ancient Job was known for his troubles, even today people say 'sounds like you're having the troubles of Job'); a proverb

blatant.adjective
totally or offensively conspicuousor obtrusive-(a blatant lie); unpleasantly loud and noisy (there are those who find the trombones blatant and the triangle silly, but both add effective color to the music)
synonym.vociferous
blatantly.adverb
blatancy.noun

bleak, bleaker, bleakest.adjectives
gloomy and somber; dreary.(life in some third world countries is often bleak and difficult); providing no encouragement; depressing (a bleak prospect); cold and cutting; raw (bleak winds of the North Atlantic); exposed to the elements; unsheltered and barren (the bleak, treeless regions of the high Andes)
bleakly.adverb
bleakness.noun

Richard Byrd, 1888-1957, American explorer, author, aviator, and naval officer, known for leading several air and land expeditions to Antarctica and for discoveries there. Richard Byrd was born in Winchester, Virginia. He was graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1912. On May 9, 1926, American explorer Richard Byrd flew over the North Pole in a plane piloted by Floyd Bennett. The men began their journey in Spitsbergen (now Svalbard), a Norwegian archipelago in the Arctic Ocean. Taken in Spitsbergen before the flight, this photograph shows Byrd holding a specially designed helmet. In 1927 Byrd flew the first transatlantic airmail from New York to France with Norwegian American Bernt Balchen and Americans Bertrand B. Acosta and George O. Noville. During his first expedition to Antarctica, from 1928 to 1930, Byrd established a base, Little America, on the Bay of Whales. Many other trip experiences mark his life as an adventurer.
    In 1955 Byrd was appointed head of 'Operation Deep-Freeze' an Antarctic expedition organized by the United States in connection with the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958). Early in 1956 Byrd made his third flight over the South Pole. He left the expedition shortly thereafter. Byrd wrote.Skyward.(1928), Little America.(1930),.Discovery (1935),.Exploring with Byrd (1937) and.Alone (1938)..comprised from Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

bully.noun,.plural.bullies
a person who is habitually cruel or overbearing to smaller or weaker people; to put pressure on someone in order to make them do what you want; a thug; a crud; a hoodlum; bullying is a major problem in schools caused by low consciousness kids, who themselves have such low opinions of themselves, that they are driven by the dark side to force recognition of themselves by others without regard for the feelings of the one being bullied:.Matthew 23:5 "But all their works they do for to be seen of men..."
bully, bullied, bullying, bullies.transitive verbs
to treat in an overbearing or intimidating manner; tending to browbeat others; the act of intimidating someone perceived as a  weaker person to make them do something or be a certain way; to make one's way aggressively
intransitive verb use.to behave like a bully; to force one's way aggressively or by intimidation.(they bully up to the sales bin)
bully.adjective
excellent; splendid (did a bully job of completing it on time)
bully.interjection-used to express approval (bully for you!)
bully.noun
canned or pickled beef (called bully beef {boiled meat})

bemuse, bemused, bemusing, bemuses.transitive verbs
to cause to be bewildered; confuse; daze; to cause to be engrossed in thought
bemusedly.adverb
bemusement.noun

blurt, blurted, blurting, blurts.transitive verbs
to utter.suddenly and impulsively (blurt an inane remark)
blurter.noun

bureaucracy.noun,.plural.bureaucracies
departments of an administration and their officials as a group (promised to reorganize the federal bureaucracy); management or administration marked by diffusion of authority among numerous offices and adherence to inflexible rules of operation
bureaucrat.noun,.plural.bureaucrats
an official of a bureaucracy; an official who is rigidly.devoted to the details of administrative.procedure and process
bureaucratic.adjective
bureaucratically.adverb

bizarre.adjective
strikingly.unconventional and far-fetched; odd; fantastic
bizarrely.adverb
bizarreness.noun

benumb, benumbed, benumbing, benumbs.transitive verbs
to make numb, especially by cold; to make inactive; dull; daze
benumbment.noun

blueprint.noun,.plural.blueprints
a photographic reproduction, as of architectural plans or technical drawings, rendered as white lines on a blue background; a detailed plan of action; plan
blueprint, blueprinted, blueprinting, blueprints.transitive verbs
to make a blueprint of; to lay a plan for

bootlick, bootlicked, bootlicking, bootlicks.verbs
transitive verb use.to behave toward in a servile or obsequious.manner
intransitive verb use.to behave in a servile or obsequious manner; fawn (an ancient example: Daniel 6:1-6)
bootlicker.noun,.plural.bootlickers

beware, bewared, bewaring, bewares.verbs
transitive verb use.to be wary of; to be on guard against; be cautious of
intransitive verb use.to be cautious; exert caution (We had to beware of the icy patches on the road; Beware of the dog)

bustle, bustled, bustling, bustles.intransitive and transitive verb use
to move or cause to move energetically and busily (the crowd was bustling over Christmas shopping)
bustle.noun
excited and often noisy activity; a stir
bustle.noun
a frame or pad to support and expand the fullness of the back of a woman's skirt

bore, bored, boring, bores.transitive verbs
to make weary by being dull, repetitive or tedious (the play bored us)
bore.noun,.plural.bores
one that arouses boredom
boredom.noun
the condition or state of being bored, that is, not or barely interested in doing anything (he had given up attending lectures out of sheer boredom; they often find they begin to chat to relieve the boredom of the flight)

boring.adjective
uninteresting and tiresome; dull
boringly.adverb
boringness.noun

bore, bored, boring, bores.verbs
transitive verb use.to make a hole in or through, with or as if with a drill; to form (a tunnel, for example) by drilling, digging or burrowing
intransitive verb use.to make a hole in or through something with or as if with a drill; to proceed or advance steadily or laboriously (a boat boring through heavy seas)
bore.noun
a hole or passage made by or as if by use of a drill; a hollow, usually cylindrical chamber or barrel, as of a firearm; the interior diameter of a hole, tube or cylinder; the caliber of a firearm; a drilling tool

bore.noun
a high, often dangerous wave caused by the surge of a flood tide upstream in a narrowing estuary or by colliding tidal currents; also called eagre

boor.noun,.plural.boors
if you refer to someone as a boor, you think their behavior and attitudes are rough, uneducated and rude; an ill mannered person with rude, clumsy.manners.and little refinement, often characteristic of bullies; an oaf; a lout
boorish.adjective
resembling or characteristic of a boor; rude and clumsy in behavior; cloddish; tacky; unsophisticated; lacking.sophistication; uncouth; crude; crass; graceless; uncultured; unrefined; unpolished; coarse; discourteous; ill-bred; obnoxious; impolite; improper; indelicate; unmannerly
boorishly.adverb
boorishness.noun
antonyms.sophisticated; refined; polished; courteous; polite; well-mannered

born.verb
past participle of bear
born.adjective
brought into life by birth; brought into existence; created; compare begotten
bore.verb
past tense of bear
bear, bore, borne.or.born, bearing, bears.verbs
transitive verb use.to hold up; support; to carry on one's person; convey (he bore the package all the way up to the third floor); to carry in the mind; harbor (bear a grudge); to transmit at large; relate (bearing glad.tidings); to have as a visible characteristic (bore a scar on the left arm); to have as a quality; exhibit (she bore her friendly manner every place she went); to carry (oneself) in a specified way; conduct (he bore himself with dignity). 8. To be accountable for; assume (bearing heavy responsibilities); to have a tolerance for; endure (couldn't bear seeing her hurt); to call for; warrant (this case bears investigation); to give birth to; to produce; yield (plants bearing flowers); to offer; render (I will bear witness to the deed)
intransitive verb use.to yield fruit; produce (peach trees that bear every summer); to have relevance; apply (they studied the ways in which the relativity theory bears on the history of science); to exert pressure, force or influence; to endure something with tolerance and patience (bear with me while I explain matters); to extend or proceed in a specified direction (the road bears to the right at the bottom of the hill)
bear down.phrasal verb
to apply maximum effort and concentration (if you really bear down, you will finish the school year with honors)
bear out.phrasal verb
to prove right or justified; confirm (the test results bear out our claims)
bear up.phrasal verb
to withstand stress, difficulty or attrition (the person easily bore up under the strain of the exam)
bear down on.idiom
to effect in a harmful or adverse way (financial pressures are bearing down on them)
bear fruit.idiom
to come to a satisfactory conclusion or to fruition
bear in mind.idiom
to hold in one's mind; remember (bear in mind that bridges freeze before roads)
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