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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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Ovid.B.C.E. 43- 17 A.D..Roman poet known for his explorations of love, especially the Art of Love, circa B.C.E. 1 and Metamorphoses.circa 8 A.D.
Ovidian.adjective

ode.noun,.plural.odes
an ode is a poem, one that is written in praise of a particular person, thing or event; a lyric poem of some length, usually of a serious or meditative.nature (the stirring.Ode To Joy.in Ludwig van Beethoven's best known composition, the.Ninth Symphony)
odic.adjective

overthrow, overthrew, overthrown, overthrowing, overthrows.transitive verbs
to get rid of the rules, ideas or systems of a society; the defeat and removal from power of a leader or government, especially by force of the peoples' will; to throw over; overturn; to bring about the downfall or destruction of (the corporation made plans for the overthrow of the employees' pension savings); in sports, to throw an object over and beyond an intended mark (the infielder overthrew first base)
overthrow.noun,.plural.overthrows
an instance of overthrowing, especially one that results in downfall or destruction; in sports, the throwing of a ball over and beyond a target, especially in baseball

overmuch.adjective
too much; excessive
overmuch.adverb
in excess
overmuch.noun
an excessive amount

overstep, overstepped, overstepping, oversteps.transitive verbs
to go beyond a limit; exceed (overstepped the bounds of taste with a ridiculous choice of clothes and makeup)

outskirt.noun,.plural.outskirts
the outskirts of a city or town are the parts of it that are farthest away from its centre (she lives on the outskirts of Paris)

old-fashioned.adjective
something such as a style, method or device that is old-fashioned is no longer used, done or admired by most people, because it has been replaced by something that is more modern(the house was dull, old-fashioned and in bad condition; there are some traditional farmers left who still make the best cheese the old-fashioned way); old-fashioned ideas, customs or values are the ideas, customs and values of the past; of a style or method formerly in vogue; outdated; attached to or favoring methods, ideas or customs of an earlier time (old-fashioned customs that are still carried on)
old-fashioned.noun
a cocktail made of whiskey, bitters, sugar and fruit

outdated.adjective
out-of-date; old-fashioned
outdate, outdated, outdating, outdates.transitive verbs
to replace or make obsolete or old-fashioned

ovoid also ovoidal.adjective
shaped like an egg
ovate.noun
something that is shaped like an egg
ovate.adjective
shaped like an egg; oval; broad and rounded at the base and tapering toward the end (an ovate leaf)
ovately.adverb

oval.adjective
resembling an egg in shape; resembling an ellipse in shape; elliptical
oval.noun,.plural.ovals
an egg-shaped or elliptical form or figure; an elliptical track, as for racing or athletic events
ovally.adverb
ovalness.noun

oaf.noun,.plural.oafs
a person regarded as awkward and stupid or clumsy
oafish.adjective
oafishly.adverb
oafishness.noun

oar.noun,.plural.oars
a long, thin, usually wooden pole with a blade at one end, used to row or steer a boat
oar, oared, oaring, oars.verbs
transitive verb use.to propel with or as if with oars or an oar; to traverse with or as if with oars or an oar (it took an hour to oar the strait)
intransitive verb use.to move forward by or as if by rowing (oared strongly through the choppy waters)
oared.adjective
oarless.adjective

oarlock.noun,.plural.oarlocks
a device, usually a U-shaped metal.hoop on a swivel in the gunwale, used to hold an oar in place and as a fulcrum in rowing

overview.noun,.plural.overviews
a broad, comprehensive view; a survey; a summary or review; an overview of a situation is a general.understanding or description of it as a whole (the central section of the book is a historical overview)

overcome, overcame, overcoming, overcomes.verbs
transitive verb use.to defeat a bothersome.issue or conflict; conquer; to prevail over; surmount (tried to overcome the obstacles of poverty)
intransitive verb use.to surmount opposition; be victorious

opus.noun,.plural.opera.or.opuses
a musical theatrical presentation in which a dramatic performance is set to music (opera stars; an opera libretto)
operatic.adjective
of, related to or typical of the opera (an operatic aria)
operatically.adverb

oleoresin.noun,.plural.oleoresins
a naturally occurring mixture of an oil and a resin extracted from various plants, such as pine or balsam fir
oleoresinous.adjective

outweigh, outweighed, outweighing, outweighs.transitive verbs
to weigh more than; to be more significant than; exceed in value or importance (the benefits don't outweigh the risks)

on.preposition
if someone or something is on a surface or object, the surface or object is immediately.below them and is supporting their weight
(he is sitting beside her on the sofa; on top of the cupboards are straw baskets which Pat uses for dried flower arrangements; on the table were dishes and utensils ready for the evening meal); the word on is used to indicate position above and supported by or in contact with (the vase is on the table); also used to indicate contact with or extent over a surface regardless of position (a picture on the wall; a scratch on my back); used to indicate location at or along (the pasture on the south side of the river; a house on the highway); used to indicate proximity (a town on the border); used to indicate attachment to or suspension from (beads on a string); used to indicate figurative or abstract position (she's a little on the young side, but well experienced in nursing; she's on her third beer; he stopped reading on chapter six); used also as follows (jumped on the table; going on six o'clock; came on the answer after some thinking about it; every hour on the hour; on July third is her birthday; on entering the room, she saw him; the spotlight fell on the actress; he knocked on the door; gazed on the vista; cut his foot on the broken glass; talked on the telephone; went on a diet;."We will reach our judgments not on intentions or on promises but on deeds and on results"....Margaret Thatcher; he has to travel on business; ride on a train; beer on tap; a physician on call; a book on astronomy; she hadn't a cent on her; drinks are on the house; I'll be right there
on.adverb
put the coffee on; put your winter clothes on today; he looked on while the ship docked; the circus moved on to the next city; I'll do it later on; he quietly worked on his hobby; please turn on the radio; stay on overnight, we have room; hang on to this for a moment
on.adjective
the TV is on; she's on in five minutes; someone is is always on at the police station; we have nothing on for this weekend; is the parade on tomorrow? 
Usage note:.to indicate motion toward a position, both 'on' and 'onto' can be used (the cat jumped 'on' the table; the cat jumped 'onto' the table); 'onto' is more specific, however, in indicating that the motion was initiated from an outside point (he wandered 'onto' the Scottish marsh means that he began his wandering at some point off the marsh; he wandered 'on' the Scottish marsh may mean that his wandering began on the marsh); In constructions where 'on' is an adverb attached to a verb, it should not be joined with 'to', to form the single word 'onto'
(move 'on to', not 'onto', new ground; hold 'on to', not 'onto', our gains); in their uses to indicate spatial relations 'on' and 'upon' are often interchangeable (it was resting 'on' or 'upon' two supports' she took it 'on' or 'upon' herself to finish the painting; we saw a finch light 'on' or 'upon' a bough); To indicate a relation between two things, however, instead of between an action and an end point, 'upon' cannot always be used (hand me the book 'on' not 'upon' the shelf) unless it was, that is 'up on' the shelf; (it was the only town 'on' not 'upon' the main line. Similarly, 'upon' cannot always be used in place of 'on' when the relation is not spatial (he wrote a book 'on' not 'upon' evolution; she will be here 'on' not 'upon' Tuesday. See more Usage notes
on and on.idiom
without stopping; continuously (he went on and on saying the importance of supporting the cause)
on track.idiom
achieving or doing what is necessary or expected; following a course likely to achieve what has been planned or what is required
onto.preposition
on top of; upon (the dog jumped onto the chair)
onto.adjective

oven.noun,.plural.ovens
a chamber or enclosed.compartment for heating, baking or roasting food, as in a stove or for firing, baking, hardening or drying objects, as in a kiln

overflow, overflowed, overflowing, overflows.verbs
intransitive verb use.to flow or run over the top, brim or banks; . to be filled beyond capacity, as a container or waterway (the kids overflowed the bathroom sink); to have a boundless.supply; be superabundant; teem (the streams were overflowing with fish)
transitive verb use.to flow over the top, brim or banks of; to spread or cover over; flood; to cause to fill beyond capacity overflow.noun,.plural.overflows
the act of overflowing; something that flows over; an excess; an outlet or a vent through which excess liquid may escape
Computers:.a condition in which a calculation produces a unit of data too large to be stored in the location allotted to it
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