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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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dilettante.noun,.plural.dilettantes.also.dilettanti
a dabbler in an art or a field of knowledge; amateur; a lover of the fine arts; a connoisseur
dilettante.adjective
superficial; amateurish
dilettantish.adjective
dilettantism.noun

dislocate, dislocates, dislocated, dislocating.transitive verbs
to put out of usual or proper place, position or relationship; to displace a body part, especially to displace a bone from its normal position (dislocated his shoulder)
dislocation.noun
the act or process of dislocating or the state of having been dislocated; displacement of a body part, especially the temporary displacement of a bone from its normal position

dock.noun,.plural.docks
the area of water between two piers or alongside a pier that receives a ship for loading, unloading or repairs; a pier; a wharf;  a platform at which trucks or trains load or unload cargo; the solid or fleshy part of an animal's tail; the tail of an animal after it has been bobbed or clipped; an enclosed place where the defendant stands or sits in a court of law
dock, docks, docked, docking.verbs
transitive verb use.to maneuver a vessel or vehicle into or next to a dock; to couple two or more spacecraft, for example, in space; to clip short or cut off an animal's tail, for example; to deprive of a benefit or a part of one's wages (the corrupt company docks its employees for being late for any reason); to withhold or deduct a part from one's salary or wages
intransitive verb use.to move or come into a dock

disengage, disengaged, disengaging, disengages.verbs
transitive verb use.to release from something that holds fast, connects or entangles; extricate; to release oneself; if you disengage something or if it disengages, it becomes separate from something which it has been attached to (the brake cable became disengaged); to move so that you are not touching or holding someone; disengage yourself (Sally found it difficult to disengage herself from her passion for carpentry); if you disengage something, especially a part of a machine or if it disengages, you make it move away from another part that it was connected to
intransitive verb use.to free or detach oneself; withdraw disengagement.noun

depart, departed, departing, departs.verbs
intransitive verb use.to go away; leave; to vary, as from a regular course; deviate (depart from polite ways of interacting with others)
transitive verb use.to go away from; leave
departure.noun,.plural.departures
the act of leaving; a starting out, as on a trip or a new course of action (a departure lounge at airports; departure dates by bus); a divergence or deviation, as from a plan (ordered curry as a departure from his usual bland diet)

dematerialize, dematerialized, dematerializing, dematerializes.transitive and intransitive verbs
to lose physical substance; make or become immaterial (eagles dematerialize and then reappear, teleporting themselves over large areas; mirrors have the effect of dematerializing a wall; ice eventually dematerializes, then evaporates; the dry ice seemed to dematerialize as it sublimated
dematerialization.noun
to cause to become or appear immaterial
intransitive verb use.to lose or appear to lose materiality

disquiet, disquieted, disquieting, disquiets.transitive verbs
to deprive of peace or rest; trouble
disquiet.noun
absence of peace or rest; anxiety
disquiet.adjective
uneasy; restless
disquietingly, disquietly.adverbs
disquietness.noun

dehiscence.noun
an opening at definite places at maturity to release or expose the contents, such as seeds from a fruit or pollen from an anther; in medicine, a splitting open or a rupture, as of a surgical wound or of an organ or a structure to discharge its contents
dehiscent.adjective

dissociate, dissociated, dissociating, dissociates.verbs
transitive verb use.to remove from association; separate
intransitive verb use.to cease associating; to part
dissociative.adjective
dissociation.noun
the act of dissociating or the condition of having been dissociated; in chemistry, the chemical process by means of which a change in physical condition, as in pressure or temperature or the action of a solvent causes a molecule to split into simpler groups of atoms, single atoms or ions; the separation of an electrolyte into ions of opposite charge; in biology, the process by which some microbes.differentiate or mutate
dissociable.adjective
that can be dissociated; separable (to many, drugs and crime are not dissociable)
dissociability.or.dissociableness.noun
dissociably.adverb

defeat, defeated, defeating, defeats.transitive verbs
to win victory over; beat; to prevent the success of; thwart (internal.strife defeats the purpose of teamwork); to make void; annul
defeat.noun,.plural.defeats
the act of defeating or state of being defeated; failure to win; a coming to naught; frustration (the defeat of a lifelong dream that proved more stupid as we pursued it); the act of making null and void
defeater.noun,.plural.defeaters

driveshaft.also.drive shaft.noun,.plural.driveshafts.also.drive shaft
a rotating.shaft that transmits.mechanical power from a motor or an engine to a point or region of application; a rotating shaft which transmits torque in an engine; a driveshaft is a shaft in a car or other vehicle that transfers power from the gear box to the wheels to make them turn, thus making the vehicle move; a technical a part of a vehicle that takes power from the gearbox to the wheels

drag, dragged, dragging, drags.verbs
transitive verb use.to pull along with difficulty or with using a lot of effort; haul (dragged the heavy box out of the way); to cause to trail along a surface, such as the ground; to move or bring by force or with great effort (have to drag me to the dentist and on an airplane); to search or sweep the bottom of a body of water, as with a grappling hook or dragnet; to prolong.tediously (the professor's talk dragged on seemingly forever)
intransitive verb use.to trail along the ground (the dog's leash dragged on the sidewalk); to move slowly or with effort; to lag behind; to pass or proceed slowly, tediously or laboriously (the time dragged as we waited); to search or dredge the bottom of a body of water (dragging for sunken treasure) 
drag.noun,.plural.drags
the act of dragging; something or someone that impedes or slows things down; a drawback or burden (the drag of unnecessary taxation); the scent or trail of a fox or another animal; something that provides an artificial scent; something that is obnoxiously tiresome (the evening was a real drag); a street or road (the town's main drag)
drag one's feet.or.drag one's heels.idiom
to act or work with intentional slowness; delay ("bureaucracy has been known to drag its feet in implementing directives with which it disagrees”....Henry A. Kissinger)

dress, dressed, dressing, dresses.verbs
transitive verb use.to put clothes on; clothe; to furnish with clothing; to decorate or adorn (dress a Christmas tree); to arrange a display in (dress a store window); to apply medication, bandages or other therapeutic materials to a wound; to arrange and groom the hair, as by styling, combing and/or washing; to clean fish or fowl for cooking or sale (dressed the turkey for Thanksgiving Day dinner); to trim and finish the surface of (dress a wooden plank)
intransitive verb use.to put on clothes; to wear clothes of a certain.kind or style (dresses casually) he almost always wears a suit with a vest); to wear better than normally worn clothes (dressed up for dinner)
dress.noun,.plural.dresses
clothing; apparel; a style of clothing (folk dancers in clothes having the colors of their country); a one-piece outer garment for women or girls
dress.adjective
suitable for many occasions (dress shoes that also handled casual outings); requiring.formal clothes (a dress dinner)
dress up.phrasal verb
to wear formal or upper casual clothes (they dressed up and went to the school prom)
dress down.phrasal verb
to wear informal clothes, befitting an occasion or location (she dressed down for such a casual occasion)

dowry.noun,.plural.dowries
money or property brought by a bride to her husband at marriage; also called dower; a sum of money required of a postulant at a convent
dower.noun,.plural.dowers
the part or interest of a deceased man's real estate allotted by law to his widow for her lifetime; also called dowry; a natural endowment or gift
dower, dowered, dowering, dowers.transitive verbs
to give a dower to; endow

deacon.noun,.plural.deacons
a layperson who assists a minister in various.functions

delta.noun,.plural.deltas
a usually triangular.shaped alluvial deposit at the mouth of a tidal inlet of a river, caused by tidal currents forming them from sediment.occurring.annually to rivers like the Nile River in Egypt, the longest river in the world, located in northeastern Africa; its source is Lake Victoria and from here flows north through the countries of Uganda, the Sudan and Egypt all the way to the Mediterranean Sea, covering a distance of 4160 miles (6695 kilometers) from its beginning in Burundi
deltic.or.deltaic.adjective
the word delta is used also with reference to the Nile River delta, as the delta resembles the Greek alphabet letter for the number '4'
delta.noun,.plural.deltas
the fourth letter of the Greek alphabet
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