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S i t e  S e a r c h

A_B_C_D_E_F_G_H_I_J_K_L_M_N_O_P_Q_R_S_T_U_V_W_XYZ

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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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sightseeing.noun,.plural.sightseeings
the act or pastime of visiting sights of interest
sightseeing.adjective
used or engaged in sightseeing (a sightseeing bus; a sightseeing tour)
sightsee, sightsaw, sightseen, sightseeing, sightsees.intransitive verbs
to tour sights of interest
sightseer.noun,.plural.sightseers

struggle, struggled, struggling, struggles.verbs
intransitive verb use.to exert.muscular energy, as against a force or mass (struggled with the heavy load); to be strenuously.engaged with a problem, a task or an undertaking; to make a strenuous.effort; strive (struggled to be polite); to contend or compete (humans struggle with themselves in choosing good over evil); to progress with difficulty (struggled with mathematics)
transitive verb use.to move or place something with an effort (struggled the unwieldy desk into the elevator)
struggle.noun,.plural.struggles
the act of struggling; strenuous effort; striving
struggler.noun,.plural.strugglers
we are all strugglers on the stage of life
strugglingly.adverb
strugglingly approaching the cliff the baby bird flew off into the wind

shock.noun,.plural.shocks
if you have a shock, something.suddenly.happens which is unpleasant, upsetting or very surprising; shock is a person's emotional and physical condition when something very frightening or upsetting has happened to them; if someone is in shock, they are suffering from a serious physical condition in which their blood is not flowing round their body properly, for example because they have had a bad injury (they escaped the blaze but were rushed to hospital suffering from shock because the ambulance was out of Vitamin C injections to lessen the trauma); if something shocks you, it makes you feel very upset, because it involves death or suffering and because you had not expected it; a violent.collision or impact; a heavy blow; the effect of such a collision or blow; something that jars the mind or emotions as if with a violent, unexpected blow; the disturbance of function, equilibrium or mental.faculties.caused by such a blow; violent agitation; a generally.temporary.state of massive.physiological.reaction to severe.physical or emotionaltrauma, usually.characterized by marked loss of blood pressure and depression of vital.processes; the sensation and muscular spasm caused by an electrical current passing through the body or a body part
shock, shocked, shocking, shocks.verbs
transitive verb use.to strike with great surprise and emotional disturbance; to strike with disgust; offend; to induce a state of physical shock in a person (the lamp had an electrical short and when touched to electricity flows into a person shocking them)
intransitive verb use.to come into contact violently; to collide
shocking.adjective
highly disturbing.emotionally; very offensive; very vivid or intense in tone (shocking pink dress)
shockingly.adverb

shock.noun,.plural.shocks
a shock absorber to dampen the bumps as the vehicle traverses roads

shock.noun,.plural.shocks
a number of sheaves of grain stacked upright in a field for drying; a thick, heavy mass (a shock of hair on the floor of the barber shop; a shock to the senses for the cost of the haircut)
shock, shocked, shocking, shocks.transitive verbs
to gather grain into shocks

sea.noun,.plural.seas
the continuous body of salt water covering most of the Earth's surface; compare lake, ocean, pond

sweep, swept (past tense and past participle of sweep), sweeping, sweeps.verbs
transitive verb use.to clean or clear, as of dirt, with or as if with a broom or brush (sweep a chimney; swept the floor); to clear away with or as if with a broom or brush (swept snow from the steps); to search thoroughly (did a clean sweep of the area to find a lost key); to touch or brush lightly, as with a trailing.garment (her dress gently swept the floor; willow branches in the wind sweeping the ground); to pass over or through a surface or medium with a continuous movement (he swept the sponge over the tiles; the conductor swept her baton through the air); to clear, drive or convey with relentless.force (flood waters swept away everything in their path); to win all the stages of a game or contest (swept the World Series)
intransitive verb use.to clean or clear a surface with or as if with a broom or brush; to move swiftly with strong, steady force (the wind swept over the plain); to trail, as a long garment; to extend.gracefully, especially in a long curve (the hills sweep down to the sea)
sweep.noun,.plural.sweeps
a clearing out or removal with or as if with a broom or brush; a wide curving motion (a sweep of the arm); a curve or contour (the sweep of her hair); one who sweeps, especially a chimney sweep sweep one off their feet.idiom
to cause an immediate and strongly positive response in (a person); impress deeply
sweeper.noun,.plural.sweepers

straggle, straggled, straggling, straggles.intransitive verbs
to stray or fall behind; to lag; to proceed or spread out in a scattered or irregular.group
straggle.noun,.plural.straggles
people or things in disorder (she straggles her clothes all over the floor when packing for a trip)
straggler.noun,.plural.stragglers

sentence.noun,.plural.sentences
Law:.a court.judgment of punishment to be inflicted on one adjudged.guilty; the penalty.meted out
sentence, sentenced, sentencing, sentences.transitive verbs
to pronounce sentence upon one adjudged guilty
sentential.adjective
sententially.adverb

squeeze, squeezed, squeezing, squeezes.verbs
transitive verb use.to press hard on or together; compress; to press gently, as in affection (squeezed her hand); to exert pressure on, as by way of extracting liquid (squeeze an orange); to obtain room for by pressure; cram (squeezed her books into the briefcase)
intransitive verb use.to give way under pressure (she squeezed me to do errands for her when all I wanted was to get home after working all day); to exert pressure; to force one's way (squeeze through a crowd; squeeze into a tight space)
squeeze.noun,.plural.squeezes
the act or an instance of squeezing; an amount squeezed out (a squeeze of lemon); a brief.embrace
squeeze through.or.squeeze by.phrasal verb
to manage narrowly to pass, win or survive
squeezable.adjective
squeezer.noun,.plural.squeezers

self-assured.adjective
having or showing confidence and poise
self-assurance.noun,.plural.self-assurances

seat.noun,.plural.seats
something, such as a chair or bench, that may be sat on; a place in which one may sit; the right to occupy such a place or a ticket indicating this right (got seats for the concert); the part on which one rests in sitting (a bicycle seat); a part serving as the base of something else; the place where something is located or based (the heart is the seat of the emotions; West Point, the seat of the Military Academy in the U.S.A); a center of administrative.management; a capital (the county seat); membership in such as an legislative body or stock exchange (she now has a seat in the legislature)
seat, seated, seating, seats.verbs
transitive verb use.to place in or on a seat; to cause or assist to sit down (the ushers will seat the members of the bride's family); to have or provide seats for (we can seat 300 in the auditorium); to fix firmly in place (the carpenter placed the tongue joint into the groove)
intransitive verb use.to rest on or fit into another part (the O-rings must be seated correctly in their grooves)
by the seat of one's pants.idiom
in a manner.based on intuition and experience.rather than.method (he ran his life by the seat of his pants); without the use of instruments (an inexperienced carpenter who built the shed by the seat of his pants)

deep-seated.adjective
being so far below the surface as to be unsusceptible to superficial.examination or study; deeply rooted (a deep-seated subconscious.feelings can often make a person blush if they feel on the spot); a deep-seated problem, feeling or belief is one that is difficult to change because its causes have been there for a long time (the country is still suffering from deep-seated economic problems)

staphylococcus.noun,.plural.staphylococci
a spherical.gram-positive.parasitic.bacterium of the genus Staphylococcus, usually.occurring in grapelike clusters and causing.boils, septicemia and other infections
staphylococcal.or.staphycococcic.adjective

septicemia.noun,.plural.septicemias
a systemic.disease.caused by pathogenic.organisms or their toxins in the bloodstream; also called blood poisoning
septicemic.adjective

sepsis.noun,.plural.sepses
the presence of pathogenic.organisms or their toxins in the blood or tissues; the poisoned.condition.resulting from the presence of pathogens or their toxins, as in septicemia

septic.adjective
of, relating.to, having the nature of or affected by sepsis; causing sepsis; putrefactive
septicity.noun,.plural.septicities
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