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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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primitive.adjective
not derived from something else; primary or basic; of or relating to an earliest or original stage or state; primeval
primitive.noun
an unsophisticated person; one that is at a low or early stage of development; one belonging to an early stage in the development of an artistic trend
primitively.adverb
primitiveness or primitivity.noun

Patmos.noun
an island of southeast Greece in the Dodecanese Islands of the Aegean Sea. Saint John was exiled to the island c. 95 A.D. and wrote the Book of Revelation here

passivity.noun
the condition or quality of being passive; inactivity, quiescence, or submissiveness
passive.adjective
if you describe someone as passive, you mean that they do not take resistive action but instead allow things to occur, believing all is working out according to some divine plan (her passive attitude made things peaceful for all of us; he sat there passively, content to wait for his father to make the opening move); a passive activity involves watching, looking at or listening to things rather than a hectic involvement of doing things; receiving or subjected to an action without responding or initiating an action in return (Emmanuel's example in Matthew 26:50-56); in grammar; accepting or submitting without objection or resistance; compliant; not participating, acting or operating; inert; inactive; relating to or characteristic of an inactive or submissive role in a relationship; of, relating to or being certain.bonds or shares that do not bear financial interest
passive, passiveness.nouns
one that is submissive or inactive
passively.adverb

peon.noun,.plural.peons
one bound in servitude; a menial worker; a drudge; a foot soldier
peonage.noun
the condition of being a peon under a system by which debtors are bound in servitude to their creditors until debts made by or ascribed to them are paid (government not creating their own zero interest money but putting the people in debt to a compounding interest system which produces perpetual debt)
peonage.noun
the condition of being a peon; a system by which debtors are bound in servitude to their creditors until their debts are paid

permutation.noun,.plural.permutations
a complete change; a transformation; the act of altering a given set of objects in a group
permutational.adjective

permute, permuted, permuting, permutes.transitive verbs
to change the order of; to subject to permutation
permutably.adverb
permutable.adjective
permutability.noun

precious.adjective
of high cost or worth; valuable; highly esteemed; cherished; costly; dear; beloved
precious, preciousness.nouns
one who is dear or beloved; a darling
precious, preciously.adverbs
used as an intensive-('he had precious little concern for others', in other words, so little as to be almost none)

proselytize, proselytized, proselytizing, proselytizes.verbs
transitive verb use.to win over to one's way of thinking; if you proselytize, you try to persuade someone to enter your belief structure (some evolutionists rely upon conjecture to the point of brainwashing, in efforts to proselytize others, for example the theory of evolution is still taught as factual, in spite of massive evidence to the contrary); to convert a person from one belief, doctrine, cause or faith to another
intransitive verb use.to induce another to convert to one's own religious faith; to induce someone to join one's own political party or to espouse one's doctrine
proselytization.noun,.plural.proselytizations
proselytizer.noun,.plural.proselytizers
proselyte.noun,.plural.proselytes
a new convert to a doctrine or religion
proselyte, proselyted, proselyting, proselytes.verbs
transitive verb use.to proselytize a person
intransitive verb use.to engage in proselytization
proselyter.noun,.plural.proselyters

pledge.noun,.plural.pledges
a solemn binding promise to do, give or refrain from doing something (signed a pledge never to reveal the secret); a pledge of money to a charity; something given or held as security to guarantee payment of a debt or fulfillment of an obligation
pledge, pledged, pledging, pledges.verbs
transitive verb use-to offer or guarantee by a solemn binding promise (pledge loyalty to a nation; pledged their cooperation); devote; promise; to bind or secure by or as if by a pledge (pledged themselves to the cause); to deposit as security; pawn
intransitive verb use-to make a solemn binding promise; swear

palpable.adjective
capable of being handled, touched or felt; tangible; easily perceived; obvious; perceptible
palpably.adverb
palpability.noun

palpitation.noun,.plural.palpitations
a trembling or shaking; irregular, rapid.beating or pulsation of the heart

pineal gland.noun
a small, cone shaped organ in the brain of most vertebrates that secretes the hormone.melatonin, also called epiphysis, pineal body, pineal organ

perennial.adjective
lasting or active.through the year or through many years; lasting an indefinitely long time; enduring; appearing again and again; recurrent; continual
perennial.noun,.plural.perennials
something that recurs or seems to recur on a yearly or continual basis
perennially.adverb

puke, puked, puking, pukes.transitive and intransitive verbs use
to vomit.ingested.matter or experience the action of vomiting, perhaps after gagging
puke.noun
the act of vomiting; what was vomited up

pitch.noun,.plural.pitches
a black, sticky substance that is used on roofs, the bottoms of ships, caulking between the wooden boards of ancient ships, etc, to stop water coming through (the night is as pitch black here when there is no moon out); any of various thick, dark, sticky substances obtained from the distillation.residue of coal tar, wood tar or petroleum and used for waterproofing, roofing, caulking and paving (the ancients used pitch made of earth and tree resin to seal the boards in their shipbuilding); any of various natural bitumens, such as mineralpitch or asphalt; a resin.derived from the sap of various coniferous trees, as the pines;.pitch has been used in caulking of wooden ships for thousands of years, even ancient king Jehoshaphat tried his hand at shipbuilding (1Kings 22:48,49); the ancient city of Jericho used pitch in its walls (map) and by the 1800s road engineers in Europe were using pitch to seal the spaces between paving stones; pitch is now commonly used to surface roads throughout the world
pitch, pitched, pitching, pitches.transitive verbs
to smear or cover with or as if with pitch
pitch dark, pitch black.adjectives
extremely dark

pitch, pitched, pitching, pitches.transitive verbs
to throw, usually with careful aim; to discard by throwing (pitched the can out the window into the garbage container); to trip and fall (he pitched headlong over the bike onto the ground); in baseball, to throw the ball from the pitcher's mound to the batter; to play a game as pitcher; a ball so thrown is called a pitch
intransitive verbs use.to throw or toss something, such as a ball or horseshoe; in baseball, to play in the position of pitcher; to dip a boat's bow and stern.alternately
intransitive verbs use.to throw or toss something, such as a ball or horseshoe; in baseball, to play in the position of pitcher
pitcher.noun,.plural.pitchers
one that pitches; in baseball, the player who throws the ball from the mound to the batter

pitcher.noun,.plural.pitchers
a container for liquids, usually having a handle and a lip or spout for pouring

pitch, pitched, pitching, pitches.transitive verbs
set up (pitched a tent; pitch camp)
to set at a specified downward slant (pitched the roof at a steep angle); to erect or establish; to set at a particular level, degree (pitched her expectations high); in music to set the pitch or key of; to adapt so as to be applicable; to adapt so as to be applicable; to promote to sell; to direct (pitched his speech to the teenagers in the audience; the sales pitches are heard throughout the county fair "come and try this", "win this for the little lady"); to set up living quarters (pitched their tent next to the quiet river); to settle
pitch in.phrasal verb.to join forces with others; help or cooperate

pitch, pitched, pitching, pitches.intransitive verbs
to dip a boat's bow and stern.alternately; to oscillate about a lateral.axis so that the nose lifts or descends in relation to the tail of an aircraft

pitch, pitched, pitching, pitches.intransitive verbs
to slope downward (the hill pitches steeply) the angle of a roof; a seven iron used in golf

pitch, pitched, pitching, pitches.intransitive verbs
the distinctive.quality of a sound, dependent primarily on the frequency of the sound waves produced by its source, such as a guitar and a trombone; the rapid alternation of two tones, either a whole or a half tone apart; a tremulous or pulsating.effect produced by barely.perceptible.minute and rapid.variations in the specific.quality of sound noticed amongst others of different tones; you can pick out the sound of a guitar and a trombone both playing the same tone; in printing, the density of characters in a printed line, usually expressed as characters per inch
high-pitched.adjective
high in pitch, as a voice or musical tone; steeply.sloped, as a roof; marked by or indicating.intense.emotion (a high-pitched debate)
pitch.noun,.plural.pitches
Music: to set the pitch or key of; pitch is the property of sound that we perceive as higher and lower tones. Changes in pitch are caused by differences in the frequency at which a sound wave vibrates, measured in cycles per second (cps). These samples of four tones of different pitch are shown with their wave patterns. Note that as the frequency increases, the pitch also increases and the tone sounds higher. Pitch determines the placement of a tone on a musical scale, corresponding to a standard, specified frequency and intensity. It is often used to tune both instruments and voices to one another. Perfect or absolute pitch refers to the ability to sing or recognize a given isolated.note.....comprised with Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

penury.noun
extreme want or poverty; privation; destitution; extreme dearth; barrenness or insufficiency

patrician.noun
a person of refined upbringing, manners and tastes; a member of one of the noble families of the ancient Roman Republic, which before B.C.E. the third century, had exclusive rights to the Senate and the magistracies; used as a title for members of a class of honorary nobility appointed by the Byzantine emperors; a member of the hereditary ruling class in the medieval free cities of Italy and Germany
patricianly.adverb
patrician.adjective

prune, pruned, pruning, prunes.verbs
transitive verb use.to cut off or remove dead or living parts or branches of a plant, for example to improve shape or growth (the city often prunes trees to keep branches of trees off of the electrical lines); to remove or cut out as superfluous; to keep in check; to keep at a certain standard or desired appearance (pruned the bushes as they were growing over the sidewalk) intransitive verb use.to remove what is superfluous or undesirable; to make a facial expression exhibiting ill temper or disgust
pruner.noun,.plural.pruners
a person or persons doing the work of pruning
prune.noun,.plural.prunes
the partially dried fruit of any of several varieties.of the common plum, Prunus domestica; any kind of plum that can be dried without spoiling

part.noun,.plural.parts
a portion, division, piece or segment of a whole; any of several equal portions or fractions that can constitute a whole or into which a whole can be divided (a mixture of two parts flour to one part water); a component that can be separated from or attached to a system; a detachable piece (spare parts for cars); a role (she has the main part in the play); one's responsibility, duty or obligation; share (we each do our part to keep the house clean); the line where the hair on the head is parted; in music, the music or score for a particular instrument, as in an orchestra
partly.adverb
in part or in some degree; not completely
part, parted, parting, parts.verbs
transitive verb use.to divide or break into separate parts; to break up a relationship by separating the elements involved (parted company); to comb hair, for example, away from a dividing line, as on the scalp; to divide into shares or portions to each one gets a part of the whole
intransitive verb use.to become divided or separated (the curtain parted in the middle); to go apart from one another; separate; to separate or divide into ways going in different directions (the road parts about halfway into the forest)
part.adverb
partially; in part (part yellow, part green)
part.adjective
not full or complete; partial (a part owner of the business)
part with.phrasal verb
to give up or let go of; relinquish
for the most part.idiom
to the greater extent; generally or mostly
in part.idiom
to some extent; partly
on the part of.idiom
regarding or with respect to the one specified (a brilliant strategy it was to be able to see the important tourist parts of 5 countries in 7 days)
part and parcel.idiom
a basic or essential part (a part of a window cleaner's job is to make sure that he is safe coming down the building)
take part.idiom
to join in; participate (he took part in the celebration)
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