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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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hydraulic.adjective
of, involving, moved by or operated by a fluid, especially water, under pressure; able to set and harden under water, as Portland cement; of.or.relating.to hydraulics
hydraulically.adverb
hydraulics.noun.used with a singular verb
the physical.science (physics) and technology of the static and dynamic.behavior of fluids; (thanks to hydraulics mankind developed and uses, he is able to lift weights that are very heavy; snowplows use the system of hydraulics to lift their heavy shovels)

ho.interjection
used especially to attract attention to something.specified; used to express surprise or joy or to attract attention to something sighted; to urge.onward (land ho! westward ho!)

hyperopia.noun
an abnormal.condition of the eye in which vision is better for distant objects than for near objects, resulting from the eyeball being too short from front to back, causing images to be focused behind the retina; also called farsightedness or hypermetropia
hyperope.noun
hyperopic.adjective
hypermetropia.noun
from Greek, meaning beyond measure
hypermetropic.or.hypermetropical.adjective
hypermetropy.noun,.plural.hypermetropies

hook.noun,.plural.hooks
a curved or sharply bent device, usually of metal, used to catch, drag, suspend or fasten something else; a fishhook; a means of attracting interest or attention; an enticement (she hooked us right from the start with her beautiful singing; ancient Samson got hooked on the bitch Delilah:.Judges 16:4-31)
hook, hooked, hooking, hooks.verbs
transitive verb use.to catch, suspend or connect with a hook; to snare; to fasten by or as if by a hook; to take strong hold of; captivate (a book that hooked me on the very first page)
intransitive verb use.to bend like a hook; to fasten by means of a hook

hook up.phrasal verb
to assemble or wire a mechanism; to connect a mechanism and a source of power; to form a tie or connection (he hooked up with the wrong crowd)
by hook or by crook.idiom
by whatever means possible, fair or unfair
hook, line and sinker.idiom
without hesitation or reservation; completely (jumped into the idea without thinking or getting advice about it first:.Proverbs 11:14 "Where no counsel is, the people fall, but in the multitude of counselors there is safety.")
off the hook.idiom
freed, as from blame or a vexatious.obligation (because he had prior plans, he was let off the hook of overseas travel)

heathen.noun,.plural.heathens.or.heathen
the word 'heathen' originally and simply meant 'nations' (*) and referred back then to those not of the nation of Israel;, so, there was 'Israel' and 'the nations'; the word then went on to have the meaning of a people without true.spirituality such as in their religious.worshiping.practices, alternately using despicable actions, contrived from selfish and lustful.mindsets; belonging to a religious group that is not based on principles of love and as an alternative, into various forms of idolatry; people became heathens because they didn't want (Jeremiah 44:16,17) the true god in their lives and are so stupid they make with their hands the things they worship with their minds (ancient heathen people had many idols)
heathen.adjective
heathen customs show lack of intelligence
heathendom.or.heathenism.or.heathenry.noun
heathenish.adjective
of or having to do with heathens; uncouth; barbarous
heathenishly.adverb
heathenishness.noun

heinous.adjective
grossly.wicked or reprehensible; abominable (a heinous crime)
heinously.adverb
heinousness.noun

hypothalamus.noun
the part of the brain that lies below the thalamus, forming the major portion of the ventral.region of the diencephalon (the posterior part of the forebrain that connects the mesencephalon with the cerebral hemisphere and contains the thalamus and hypothalamus) and functioning to regulate bodily temperature, certain metabolic processes and other autonomic activities
hypothalamic.adjective

heifer.noun,.plural.heifers
a young cow, especially one that has not yet given birth to a calf

heave, heaved, heaving, heaves.verbs
transitive verb use.to raise or lift, especially with great effort or force (heaved the box of books onto the table; lift; to throw a heavy object with great effort; hurl (heaved a brick through the window); to throw or toss (heaved his backpack into the corner); to vomit something)
hove.past tense.and.past participle
in nautical.terms, to raise or haul up by means of a rope, line or cable (hove the anchor up and set sail); to move a ship in a certain direction or into a certain position by hauling (the barge hove the ship astern); to make rise or swell (the wind heaving huge waves; an exhausted dog heaving its chest); in geological terms, to displace or move a vein, lode or stratum, for example (the Earth's forces moved an older vein of rock on top of the newer vein)
intransitive verb use.to rise up or swell, as if pushed up; bulge (the sidewalk froze and heaved when it thawed); to rise and fall in turn, as waves; to gag or vomit
hove.past tense.and.past participle
in nautical terms, to move in a certain direction or to a specified position (the frigate hove alongside; to pull at or haul a rope or cable (the brig is heaving around on the anchor); to push at a capstan bar or lever
heave.noun,.plural.heaves
the effort of heaving; an act of hurling; a throw, especially when considered in terms of distance (a heave of 63 feet); in geology, a horizontal dislocation, as of a rock stratum, at a fault; an upward movement; the act or an instance of gagging or vomiting
heave to.phrasal verb
to turn a sailing ship so that its bow heads into the wind and the ship lies motionless except for drifting, in order to meet a storm (the brig hove to); to turn an engine-powered vessel in a similar situation so that its bow heads into the seas while proceeding at low speed
heave ho.interjection
used as a command to sailors to pull hard on a rope or cable
heaver.noun,.plural.heavers

hinge.noun,.plural.hinges
a hinge is a piece of metal, wood or plastic that is used to join a door to its frame or to join two things together so that one of them can swing freely (the top swung open on well-oiled hinges); a jointed or flexible.device that allows the turning or pivoting of a part, such as a door or lid, on a stationary.frame; a similar.structure or part, such as one that enables the valves of a bivalve.mollusk to open and close; a point or circumstance on which subsequent.events.depend
hinge, hinged, hinging, hinges.verbs
transitive verb use.to attach by or equip with or as if with hinges or a hinge; to consider or make something) dependent on something else; predicate ("convenient and misleading fictions for hinging an argument" ...Stephen Jay Gould)
intransitive verb use.to be contingent on a single factor; depend (the plan hinges on her finishing early)

hinge on, hinges on
something that hinges on one thing or event depends entirely on it

hinge joint.noun,.plural.hinge joints
a joint, such as the elbow, in which a convex part of one bone fits into a concave part of another, allowing motion in only one plane
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