.
.
S i t e  S e a r c h

A_B_C_D_E_F_G_H_I_J_K_L_M_N_O_P_Q_R_S_T_U_V_W_XYZ

List of Topics__Ask Suby__Free Stuff__Questions Lists
Terms of Use__________________Privacy Policy

C r e a t i o n  I n d e x

C r e a t i o n  p a g e  3 7

Cells:.A cell is a small usually microscopic mass of protoplasm bounded externally.(surrounded).by a semipermeable.membrane, usually including one or more nuclei, cytoplasm and various other organelles with their products, capable alone or interacting with other cells of performing all the fundamental functions of life and forming the smallest structural unit of living matter capable of functioning independently, during the process we've labeled as mitosis.

Dean Kenyon, biochemist."We have not the slightest chance of a chemical evolutionary origin for even the simplest cells."

Every cell performs thousands of processes a second and is so efficient it only stores enough food for 3 seconds, otherwise cells would have to be larger than what they are. Each cell is a hologram of the entire universe.

A cell is able to read the DNA.code by a mechanism we don't understand and in turn select the correct amino acids joining them together to make a particular protein

Cells are more organized than a large city with supply trucks coming and going, waste removal processes, electrical and plumbing maintenance, new building construction, older building renovations and transportation systems, etc. They know how to do these things because of the invisible patterns behind them.

Scientific American.(sciam.com).August, 2001."The simplest living cell is so complex that supercomputer models may never simulate its behavior perfectly."

Cells have rotary motors that generate energy necessary for its sustenance; just like cities have power plants. Cells have a collection of pumps to import amino acids, sugars, vitamins and other nutrients needed for living.

A cell's computer memory bank must maintain its original programming in order to pass instructions from generation to generation. Obviously they worked better seven thousand years ago, than our man made computers do today. If a cell fails to generate a living descendent, all of its biological information will be lost. It had to work right the first time and every time since, or life would not be here. With machines man makes, if they do not work right, they can go back to the drawing board. If one of a cell's critical machines fails to function properly, results are disastrous. They must work and work as designed to function or we would not be here. Thus, the importance of proper nutrition for the cells; avoid all poisons in food and.all.vaccinations.

Cells have many duties involving high organization, including manufacture of DNA and sending it into chromosomes, regulating the receipt of nutrients from the blood stream and waste removal. 

"If a cell didn't have any.(and there are thousands of them).molecular motors.(some being; myosin and actin {for muscle contractions}, kinesin {transports packages of proteins around inside the cell on rails called microtubules}, myosin V {transports cargo along actin filaments in nerve endings}, etc.), it wouldn't be alive. 

"The cell is like a huge city road network, yet we know virtually nothing about the traffic signals. Even more of a mystery is the way a cell can change the layout of its entire city. For example, when a cell divides, it may change shape and tear down unnecessary microtubules."....James Spudich, Stanford University, California biochemist, in an article in New Scientist (newscientist.com), April 15, 2000, entitled 'Engines of Life'.

Spudich explains that each package has both kinesin. which transports packages of proteins around inside the cell on rails called microtubules and myosin V bound to it;."it has to know when to shut one motor off and switch tracks. How this happens is still a mystery."

Intranuclear transport is still largely a mystery. For example, how do the proteins pass from the 'suburb' where they are made, to the centre of the 'city' or out to the world beyond, the blood stream? Nobel prize winner Günter Blobel, Rockefeller University.(rockefeller.edu/pubinfo/blobelbio.php), New York, is working on the whys and hows.

The human body contains about 70 trillion cells, some estimate 100 trillion, others less than 70. 70 trillion is 70 million million. And these cells comprise trillions upon trillions of additional molecules, themselves containing even smaller unimaginable counts of atoms, themselves containing even smaller quarks, themselves containing even smaller and more numerous 'strings'.

Cells are nerve cells, blood cells, liver cells, bone cells, muscle cells, etc. Considering 75% of the body is water, there is not that much room left for them it would seem. It is a good thing ego is a thing of the spirit or in some people there would be no room for the water.

A cell exhibits mathematical design that leaves us awe struck. A cross section of it looks like a curve,."a circle that develops a waist".Ian Stewart says of it. A typical cell must have on hand about 30,000 proteins at any one time.

The 'waist' narrows, pinches into a figure 8 pattern and breaks apart into two circles. Now there are two complete cells. Man can't even make a computer do that! Too bad. It would be nice to have two in the house.

Cells use RNA.molecules as patterns for making structures called telomeres which stabilize the ends of the chromosomes. Telomeres protect chromosomes from 'unraveling' and then deteriorating.."It is the genetic equivalent of the plastic tips on the ends of your shoelaces. But every time your cells divide, the telomere gets shorter and shorter. When it disappears, your cells stop dividing and death occurs. Vitamin C.(popular thanks to the amazing work of Drs. Albert Szent Gyorgyi, Nobel prize winner and Linus Pauling, two time Nobel prize winner).has been shown to slow down the rate by as much as 62%."....totalhealthbreakthroughs.com

Dr. Al Sears has done much work on telomeres and how they reverse aging.

Molecules must perform their tasks under the cell's very crowded conditions. They must seek out their proper substrates and interact only with proper partners.

Cells being biological pathways, crisscross, branch and merge into complex networks.

The smallest active catalytic.protein molecules of the living cell consist of at least a hundred amino acids. For each, even such a short molecule, there exists 20100.(100th power).to 20130 alternative arrangements of the twenty basic monomers. An unlimited variety of macro.(larger).molecule structures is possible.

Amazingly the fertilized egg divides into these 70-100 trillion.(a trillion is a million million).cells making up the entire human body, including 12 billion brain cells which form over 120 trillion connections to the hundreds of millions of computers the body has. Amazingly it 'knows' how many cells are needed to do what and where, how many nerve connections are needed to do the highly specialized work that they do. Truly we are amazingly made:.Psalms 139:14 "I will praise thee, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Marvellous are thy works and that my soul knows right well."

A fertilized egg is one of the more complex structures in the Universe and along with DNA, were convincing reasons for Harvard University to conclude evolution is just fancy, just a fairy tale.

Chromosomes are constant at 46 to 23 in ova and sperm. They define the individual characteristics of an organism. No randomness here, just intelligent design.
 


.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
*