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C r e a t i o n  I n d e x

C r e a t i o n  p a g e  3 8

To postulate that this arose randomly.(by chance).approaches the height of total idiocy. Each cell's interaction is an indispensable requirement for another cell's functioning, therefore the same must be true for the entire organism. 

The complex world of the cell.radically changes the grounds on which Darwinian debates must be contested.

Are we accounting intelligently for cell division, where the very beginning of a new life occurs? Did a single cell first exist inertly unable to replicate? From whence came reproduction? There are factors enabling the cell to reproduce itself that are of the invisible supporting pattern. Unfolding the complexity therein has not been accounted for in the theory of evolution. 

In lieu of quantitative accounting, evolutionists often utilize circular reasoning
   Which of the many pathways might evolution have followed to produce the first cells?

If the RNA and DNA.nucleic acids came first with their encoding needed to obtain proteins in order to replicate, how were the acids replicated and translated into the proteins these same acids would require utilization of for replication? If proteins appeared first, necessary to catalyze the formulation of nucleic acids, how was the information necessary to produce the proteins themselves added?

They had to exist together at the beginning. So, how it does work? 1) DNA.encodes information so proteins can result...

Proteomics is identifying and determining the properties of the proteins the genes encode.

According to Emma Whitelaw, University of Sydney, Australia, "DNA alone does not account for all the traits inherited from one's parents. Cells have a set of instructions.(from where do the instructions come from?).that tell the genes when to be active." Craig Cooney, a DNA methylation expert at the University of Arkansas in Little Rock says "researchers should take this seriously."....New Scientist.(newscientist.com), November 13, 1999. It's a complicated system, we yet understand so little of.

We are who we are not just because of what our genes contain, but because of what has happened to us since our birth and how daily we utilize our unique genetic makeup. We are not clones.

2) RNA carries this information to specialized structures known as ribosomes. 3) Here they get translated.into proteins by virtue of a second type of RNA called tRNA.(t, for transfer), which has its own special function, that of attaching each side of itself, one side to the mRNA.(m, for messenger).and the other side to amino acids, the blocks that make up proteins. 4) Most of the proteins are enzymes, the cells' workers which catalyze many functions. One gene can be read out in portions that are sliced and diced to generate a variety of mRNAs.

The gene sequence of the human genome therefore tells only a small fraction of what a specific cell is doing. Much information is reserved and unobtainable.(Ecclesiastes 3:11; 8:17).by He who made it work.

A cell is a dynamic system, continually manufacturing new structures and ridding themselves of waste. According to Michael Behe, professor of biochemistry, each cell has about two thousand mitochondria, occupying about twenty per cent of the cell's volume. Each of these mitochondria captures foodstuffs storing it, ready for use. This is a complex process. "The system uses a flow of acid to power its machines, which shuffles electrons among about six carriers, requiring an exquisitely delicate interaction between many components." ...Michael Behe.

A cell has a need to regulate its.metabolic pathway immediately at its inception. They require regulation to function. When this regulation stops, they die. Cells control how much and what kinds of chemicals they make. Synthesis, degradation, energy generation, replication, maintenance of cell structure, mobility, regulation, repair, waste management, communication, all of these occur in each and every cell and each function requires the interaction of numerous parts. A typical cell contains thousands and thousands of different kinds of proteins to perform the many tasks of life, yet each protein has only a few uses; rhodopsin initiates vision, collagen makes up most of our skin, but these proteins can't interchange their functions. Their functions have been set by some great intelligence.
   Within a cell's interior the bacterial chromosome requires the most space.

As study continues on the cell, hundreds of precisely tailored parts with staggering complexity have been discovered. Biochemical components act as feed back systems, gears and flexible chains.

Darwinian evolution is woefully inadequate in that it does not provide a mechanism for the production of life.

How cell membranes are made: An overview. Details in Michael Behe's.(Professor of Biochemistry at Lehigh University, Pennsylvania).book, Darwin's Black Box, 1998, Simon and Schuster, Touchstone Books.   


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