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Good and poor quality doctors

A good doctor knows and guides his interaction with patients with the truth on:
...fully informed consent.(no intimidation or scantily supported 'truths'), vaccinations, GMO's harmfulness on health, environmental effects upon self and how to negate them. 

A poor quality doctor:
...doesn't know the effect invisible frequencies have on health and how a patient can be made well with them
...sees his patients' illnesses as opportunities for continual flow of money
...puts pharmaceutical drugs first and sees any side effects as opportunities for continual patient visits
...hasn't been taught about a body's electrical fields and what can affect a person's body adversely, such as wi-fi, cell phones, smart meters, etc.
...doesn't rely on that which is beyond pharmaceutical influence, thus avoiding effective natural remedies used for thousands of years
...doesn't know about disease eradication, instead being mostly interested in managing illness
...has little idea about what a virus really is

-Heart health:."While aspirin holds little promise in protecting you against heart disease, my recommendation for daily supplementation of Parent Essential Oils (PEOs) should remain at the top of your list in your efforts to protect your heart. 

"Please read my Special Report about aspirin so you can arm yourself with the best, most scientifically accurate information available. You can find this free report, plus many more, as well as videos and audio on my website, brianpeskin.com

Also avoid taking.aspirin-like fever reducer products if you have flu symptoms. On the fever reducers that apparently created the so-called 1918 flu, also called Spanish Flu, search Google or Bing for:.How we unwittingly allow flu to increase in us, by Major General Albert N. Stubblebine III, US Army, Ret..Hundreds of years safe and proven effective for infection and so many other things is silver colloidal.

-Personal care products dangers:
Those you use should be from organic or all-natural sources you can trust. Sources you can't trust are listed at ewg.org

More:
...Harmon, Katherine. Saving Face: How Safe Are Cosmetics and Body Care Products? Scientific American, May 5, 2009 scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=how-safe-are-cosmetics
...What Not to Buy. Environmental Working Group. cosmeticsdatabase.com/special/whatnottobuy/
...Agneta E, et al. Phthalate Esters and Their Effect on the Liver. Hepatology, Volume 4 Issue 3, Pages 541 547.
...Kooyers TJ and Westerhof W. Toxicology and health risks of hydroquinone in skin lightening formulations. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, Volume 20 Issue 7, Pages 777 780.
...5 Sutton R. Adolescent exposures to cosmetic chemicals of concern. Environmental Working Group, September 2008. ewg.org/reports/teens

-MSG: You must read labels. If is says, autolyzed yeast, yeast extract, hydrolyzed vegetable protein, hydrolyzed protein or texturized vegetable protein, it is MSG. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a neurotoxin as the additives in vaccines are and kids today are eating more and more foods laced with MSG as flavor enhancers. It's found in canned soups, gravy mixes, salad dressings, snack dips and virtually all 'instant' microwaveable meals. Look for 'yeast extract' on food labels and other tricky names used to disguise MSG. It's a covert source of MSG that manufacturers use to avoid having to place 'MSG' on the ingredients label. If it says, maltodextrin, barley malt, whey protein, soy protein isolate (or words to that nature), it is MSG.

Gelatin (used in vitamin capsules) contains MSG. Most smoke flavor or 'flavorings' contain MSG. Soy sauce, made from the fermentation of soy beans contains MSG and pure MSG powder can be added to cheaper brands of soy sauce to enhance its flavor. Confirmed with Fearn Foods, the manufacturer of Spike, regular Spike (the one with salt) contains MSG.

MSG is in vegetarian meat analogs 'hot dog analogs', soup broths, bouillon and products using the words containing protein fortified, enzyme modified, rice syrup, brown rice syrup, citric acid, milk powder, dry milk solids, annatto, hidden often under the word spice, carrageenan, guar gum and lecithin (if from hydrolyzed soy products).
But wait, there's more!

Candy, drinks, gum, packaged salads with citric acid, low fat milk, stevia (if coupled with maltodextrin), Accent, Lawry's Seasoning Salt, Torula Yeast, Adobo salt, Chinese Seasonings and believe it or not, internal feeding materials and some fluids administered intravenously in hospitals.

So, what is one to do? Learn to cook and eat naturally, forget fast foods except for A&W which is completely changing over to healthly. Apart from them, avoid, processed foods, animal products and dairy products and eat an organic vegan non-GMO plant based diet that is as much organic as possible. See the video from Criigen, criigen.org/?option=com_content&task=view&id=366&Itemid=130

Let your spices be natural from foods and herbs. And above all, before you buy anything packaged and/or processed, you must read labels. Not all information is required to be listed on them, so you need to learn to sense your gut feeling about what your attention is on.

One more thing, politicians that receive campaign contributions from large food companies have made it so that legislation has been passed to not list MSG as an ingredient but to euphemistically use the words mentioned above. ...search for info on MSG at naturalnews.com or mercola.com and greenmedinfo.com

Wave Motion, in physics, is a mechanism by which energy is conveyed from one place to another in mechanically propagated waves without the transference of matter. They occur at any point along the path of transmission a periodic displacement or oscillation occurs about a neutral position. The oscillation may be of air molecules, as in the case of sound traveling through the atmosphere; of water molecules, as in waves occurring on the surface of the ocean or of portions of a rope or a wire spring. In each of these cases the particles of matter oscillate about their own equilibrium position and only the energy moves continuously in one direction. Such waves are called mechanical because the energy is transmitted through a material medium without a mass movement of the medium itself. The only form of wave motion that requires no material medium for transmission is the electromagnetic wave; in this case the displacement is of electric and magnetic fields of force in space.
Waves are divided into types according to the direction of the displacements in relation to the direction of the motion of the wave itself. If the vibration is parallel to the direction of motion, the wave is known as a longitudinal wave. The longitudinal wave is always mechanical because it results from successive compressions (state of maximum density and pressure) and rarefactions (state of minimum density and pressure) of the medium. Sound waves typify this form of wave motion. Another type of wave is the transverse wave, in which the vibrations are at right angles to the direction of motion. A transverse wave may be mechanical, such as the wave projected in a taut string that is subjected to a transverse vibration (see Fig. 2), or it may be electromagnetic, such as light, X-ray or radio waves. Some mechanical wave motions, such as waves on the surface of a liquid, are combinations of both longitudinal and transverse motions, resulting in the circular motion of liquid particles.
   For a transverse wave, the wavelength is the distance between two successive crests or troughs (see pic). For longitudinal waves, it is the distance from compression to compression or rarefaction to rarefaction. The frequency of the wave is the number of vibrations, also called oscillations per second. The velocity of the wave, which is the speed at which it advances, is equal to the wavelength times the frequency. The maximum displacement involved in the vibration is called the amplitude of the wave.
   The velocity of a wave motion in matter depends on the elasticity and density of the medium. In a transverse wave on a taut string, for example, the velocity depends on the tension of the string and its mass per unit length. The velocity can be doubled by quadrupling (4 times) the tension, or it can be reduced to one-half by quadrupling the mass of the string. The motion of electromagnetic waves through space is constant at about 300,000 km/sec (about 186,000 mi/sec), or the speed of light. This velocity varies.slightly in passage through matter.
   When two waves meet at a point, the resulting displacement of that point will be the sum of the displacements produced by each of the waves. If the displacements are in the same direction, the two waves reinforce each other; if the displacements are in the opposite direction, the waves counteract each other. This phenomenon is known as interference also here called diffraction.
When two waves of equal wavelength and amplitude travel in opposite directions at the same velocity through a medium, stationary, also called standing, waves are formed. For example, if one end of a rope is tied to a wall and the other end is shaken up and down, waves will be reflected back along the rope from the wall. Assuming that the reflection is perfectly efficient, the reflected wave will be half a wavelength behind the initiating wave. Interference will take place and the resultant displacement at any given point and time will be the sum of the individual displacements. No motion will take place at points where the crest of the incident wave meets the trough of the reflected one. Such points are called nodes. Halfway between the nodes, the waves meet in the same phase; that is, crest will coincide with crest and trough with trough. At these points the amplitude of the resultant wave is twice as great as that of the incident also called the initiating wave, as earlier mentioned. Thus, the rope is divided into sections one wavelength long by the nodes, which do not progress along the rope, while the rope between the nodes vibrates transversely.
   Stationary waves are present in the vibrating strings of musical instruments. A violin string, for instance, when bowed or plucked, vibrates as a whole, with nodes at the ends and also vibrates in halves, with a node at the center, in thirds, with two equally spaced nodes and in various other fractions, all simultaneously. The vibration as a whole produces the fundamental tone and the other vibrations produce the various harmonics.
  In quantum mechanics, the structure of the atom is explained by analogy to a system of standing waves. Much of the development of modern physics is based on the elaboration of the theory of waves and wave motion. ...contributed by: 
Earnest C. Watson.....Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

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