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S i t e  S e a r c h

A_B_C_D_E_F_G_H_I_J_K_L_M_N_O_P_Q_R_S_T_U_V_W_XYZ

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Bible books history index

B i b l e :  S h o r t  H i s t o r y  O f  E a c h  B o o k
N e h e m i a h ,  E s t h e r ,  J o b ,  P s a l m s

N e h e m i a h.(*): means 'comforted by God'. Written B.C.E. 434 The son of Hachaliah.(Nehemiah. 1:1).and a captive and young cupbearer/attendant in Persia under king Artaxerxes Longimanus, with whom he was on friendly terms. attendant. Nehemiah was permitted to leave the royal palace at Shushan to return to and rebuild Jerusalem. He was probably of the tribe of Judah

Nehemiah was the Tirshata, a word probably of Persian origin, meaning 'severity', denoting a high civil.dignity, such as a governor. The Persian governor of Judea is also called Tirshata:.Ezra 2:63; Nehemiah 7:65,70.

Malachi was his contemporary

"Nehemiah lived at ease and in honour, but does not forget that his brethren are in distress. 

"Through his brother Hanani and perhaps from other sources he heard of the mournful and desolate condition of the Holy City Jerusalem and was filled with sadness of heart. For many days he fasted and mourned and prayed for the place of his fathers' sepulchres. At length the king observed his sadness of countenance and asked the reason of it. Nehemiah explained it all to the king and obtained his permission to go up to Jerusalem and there to act as Tirshatha or governor of Judea. He went up in the spring of B.C.E. 446, eleven years after Ezra, with a strong escort supplied by the king and with letters to all the pashas of the provinces through which he had to pass, as also to Asaph, keeper of the royal forests, directing him to assist Nehemiah. On his arrival he set himself to survey the city and to form a plan for its restoration, a plan which he carried out with great skill and energy, so that the whole was completed in about six months. He remained in Judea for thirteen years as governor, carrying out many reforms. At the close of this important period of his public life, he returned to Persia to the service of his royal master at Shushan or Ecbatana. Very soon after this the old corrupt state of things returned.

"Malachi now appeared among the people with words of stern reproof and solemn warning and Nehemiah again returned from Persia, after an absence of some two years and was grieved to see the widespread moral degeneracy that had taken place during his absence. He set himself with vigour to rectify the flagrant abuses that had sprung up and restored the orderly administration of public worship and the outward observance of the law of Moses. Of his subsequent history we know nothing. Probably he remained at his post as governor till his death, about B.C.E. 413, in a good old age. The place of his death and burial is, however, unknown.

"He resembled Ezra in his fiery zeal, in his active spirit of enterprise and in the piety of his life. His practical sagacity and high courage were very markedly shown in the arrangement with which he carried through the rebuilding of the wall at Jerusalem. The piety of his heart, his deeply spiritual spirit and constant sense of communion with and absolute dependence upon God, are strikingly exhibited, first in the long prayer recorded in chapter 1:5-11 and secondly and most remarkably in what have been called his 'interjectional.(sudden short).prayers', those short but moving addresses to Almighty God which occur so frequently in his writings, the instinctive outpouring of a heart deeply moved, but ever resting itself upon God.

"Judea after this was annexed to the satrapy.(the territory or sphere under the rule of a satrap; a nation, state, territory, or area controlled as if by a satrap, which is a governor of a province in ancient Persia, a ruler, a subordinate bureaucrat or an official).of Coele-Syria and was governed by the high priest under the jurisdiction of the governor of Syria and the internal government of the country became more and more a hierarchy."....comprised with Rawlinson and Eastons's Bible Dictionary.

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E s t h e r.(*): Written B.C.E. 509. The queen of Ahasuerus and heroine of the book that bears her name. Esther appears in the Bible as a 'woman of deep piety, faith, courage, patriotism and caution, combined with resolution; a dutiful daughter to her adopted father, docile, she resided with her cousin Mordecai, who held some office in the household of the Persian king at Shushan in the palace'.

Ahasuerus having divorced Vashti, chose Esther to be his wife. Soon after this he gave Haman the Agagite, his prime minister, power and authority to kill and extirpate all the Jews throughout the Persian empire. By the interposition of Esther this terrible catastrophe was averted

There must have been a singular grace and charm in her aspect and manners, since 'she obtained favour in the sight of all them that looked upon her':.Esther 2:15. That she was raised up as an instrument in the hand of God to avert the destruction of the Jewish people and to afford them protection and forward their wealth and peace in their captivity, is also manifest from the Scripture account.

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J o b.(*): Written B.C.E. 1491. He lived soon after Abraham or perhaps before that patriarch. Most likely this book was written by Job himself and it is the most ancient book in existence. 

The lessons of Job: One's relationship with the Creator should not be based on one's daily experiences, whether good or bad. He allowed his righteousness to replace the position of God's superiority in his life. His mind was on the righteousness that he understood and not on the greatness of God, but for only a while. 

When his friends confronted him in all his severe troubles, they approached it as "there is something wrong you are doing Job and won't admit too, as you are righteous in your own eyes". In this they were wrong:.Job 42:7,8. Written about 2166-1876 BCE. Job's story.

***

P s a l m s.(*): Written B.C.E. 1015, about 1000 years before Emmanuel's time in the New Testament..The psalms are the production of various authors. A psalm is a sacred song; a hymn. Some favorite ones written long ago.

Only a portion of the Book of Psalms claims David as its author. It is especially to David and his contemporaries that we owe this precious book. In the 'titles' of the Psalms, 73 of the 150 are ascribed to David. Many were written by Asaph

Peter and John.(Acts 4:25).in the New Testament ascribe to him also the second psalm, which is one of the 48 that are anonymous.

Psalteries are musical instruments such as a lyre or a harp with twelve strings which were used with other musical instruments:.2Samuel 6:5; 1Chronicles 13:8; 2Chronicles 5:12; Psalms 33:2; 150:3. A Psalterion refers to stringed instruments that would accompany such songs.

Ephesians 5:19 "Speaking to yourselves in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody in your heart to the Lord."
Colossians 3:16 "Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom; teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord."

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