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California.(population around 38 million)
California map

Canada map


Canada in 1867 meant only Ontario and Quebec
Canada in 1867 meant Ontario and Quebec

The Canadian Bill of Rights.(just below a bit).still exists but much of it has been consumed into The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms).

See also Alberta Bill of Rights, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Nuremberg Code, Canadian Labour Code and see your Canadian Passport, inside front page, which allows for free passage without delay or hindrance and with assistance and protection as may be necessary.
https://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/csj-sjc/rfc-dlc/ccrf-ccdl/check/art7.html

Remember you have inherent rights from the true God that had youborn here at this time and as such you are legally entitled to decline any of the violations of these rights. Learn the Nuremberg Code and apply it to the covid con.

Crimes against Humanity and treason come under Natural Law, Common Law, Treaty Law (look up the ones not linked above), Articles 6 and 7 of the International Criminal Court Statute, the Nuremberg Code, The Geneva Convention, The United Nations Convention, The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Canadian Labor Code, Canadian Passport, Charter and Rights resources https://action4canada.com/charter-right-resources/. and.Action4Canada-Canadian-Rights-and-Freedoms-Resource-odt-1



VAXX DOCS - Agreement to accept liability.pdf (for your boss)
VAXX DOCS - Informed Consent Questions for PCR Tests.pdf
                 - Informed Consent information.(also see the pdf above)
VAXX DOCS - Employment letter, if they are threatening you to get the vax or your out of a job. See also employment related privacy protection

Learn about the PCR test.

-https://www.constitutionalrightscentre.ca/category/newsletter/
The Trespass Act Does NOT Apply When Exercising Masking Exemption.

Meaning, stores can't legally ask you to leave. They have a business licence to be a public establishment. They can't therefor claim that you are trespassing and kick you out. But use wisdom. If it's a mask issue, for example and you're only going to be in and out, not going to hurt you to put a mask on for a few minutes. Just avoid those businesses next time:.Matthew 10:14 "And whosoever shall not receive you, nor hear your words, when you depart out of that house or city, shake off the dust of your feet." Romans 12:18 If it be possible, as much as lies in you, live peaceably with all men.(all humanity; some are not of humanity, though they may look and act as though they are)."

Action4Canada.com is the website of another of Canada's highly successful constitutional lawyers, Rocco Galati

Canadawide constitutional help, also these lawyers, Carol Crosson, Airdrie-Calgary area and her assistance of Carmen Kissel-Verrier and Leighton Grey, this pic and video.

-https://action4canada.com/filing-a-complaint-law-enforcement/
Filing a complaint (details) and law enforcement.

A business is not 'private'. When a business obtains a business license they are open to the public and they are not permitted to request proof of vaccination or discriminate against anyone who decides not to wear a mask. No exemption is required to show anyone as you have the right to choose.

Section 3, 2017 of Canada's Genetic Non Discrimination Act, covers all covid illegalities, as well as other vaccinations, stipulates no testing, masks, distancing, etc. It's serious as violation is a criminal offense carrying up to a $75,000 fine and/or a stint in prison of up to five years. The Canadian Labor Code lays it out.

To file a complaint go to a justice of the peace or your lawyer to start the process. If you don't stand against tyranny, tyranny will stand on you.

"I am against every form of tyranny over the mind of man."....Thomas Jefferson.

Once a complaint is filed, they'll be charged for treating you as they did, as your human rights were violated.

From:
https://www.priv.gc.ca/en/privacy-topics/privacy-laws-in-canada/02_05_d_15/#heading-0-0-2

Canadian Human Rights Act

Denial of commercial premises or residential accommodation

6 It is a discriminatory practice in the provision of commercial premises or residential accommodation

(a) to deny occupancy of such premises or accommodation to any individual or

(b) to differentiate adversely in relation to any individual, on a prohibited ground of discrimination.

From:
https://www.priv.gc.ca/en/privacy-topics/privacy-laws-in-canada/02_05_d_15/#heading-0-0-2

Federal Privacy Act: Nobody has the right to request to see an exemption. It is a violation of your privacy rights under the Privacy Act. This is your personal medical information between you and your physician.

Pursuant to s. 1 of the Privacy Act of B.C., RSBC 1996 CHAPTER 373, it is unlawful to violate the privacy of another person. Private health issues are strictly between an individual and their physician. There is no legal or any other obligation at law requiring anyone to divulge the nature of thier medical conditions with anyone.

Federal privacy laws and what they cover

Canada has two federal privacy laws that are enforced by the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada:
    the Privacy Act, which covers how the federal government handles personal information;
    the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA), which covers how businesses handle personal information.

The Privacy Act
From a New Brunswick business owner: To any business owner that is thinking of supporting the v pass......
Here are the facts:
-If you choose to discriminate against someone based off of medical conditions, race, sex, religion etc or in this case, one does NOT have an V-Pass (it's illegal, so why would you be asking for it?) you are liable for thousands of dollars in fines and courts costs and a prison term.
-The NB government cannot intervene in a dispute between a person(s) and business or businesses. You have to initiate action before the court can act.
-A business saying they are 'following the government mandate' (which are technically illegal at this point or untested in court) is not a defense or reason to deny
-Upon a complaint filed to the Human Rights Commission against your business, you the business owner will be asked to explain why you discriminated. 
-The government will NOT help small businesses defend the matter (makes you think why the big franchise restaurant got a pass).
-You the business owner will eventually be fined and pay legal costs including damages under the current Federal Law. Again there there is NO legal protection offered by the government for you. (I encourage you to do your research and seek legal council). 
Feel free to contact your BIA, Lawyer or Human Rights commissioner (1-888-471-2233) for your own due diligence where you can file complaints about businesses violating human rights like Community Natural Foods in Calgary, Alberta. See 
albertahumanrights.ab.ca/complaints/forms/Pages/complaint_form_and_guide.aspx

-https://action4canada.com/filing-human-rights-complaints/
Filing rights violation complaints.
Also see Nuremberg Code.

At Action4Canada.com, lawyer Rocco Galati's mission is to protect Canada's rich heritage which is founded on Judeo-Christian principles.
Inherited through our British Commonwealth and embedded in the Magna Carta, it forms our laws and values and is a system of governance which sets us apart from totalitarian, communist and socialist regimes. Giving Canadians the freedom to believe or not to believe, without fear of persecution.

The Canadian Bill of Rights
1960, c. 44

An Act for the Recognition and Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms

 [Assented to 10th August 1960]

Preamble
The Parliament of Canada, affirming that the Canadian Nation is founded upon principles that acknowledge the supremacy of God.(Natural Law), the dignity and worth of the human person and the position of the family in a society of free men and free institutions;

Affirming also that men and institutions remain free only when freedom is founded upon respect for moral and spiritual values and the rule of law;

And being desirous of enshrining these principles and the human rights and fundamental freedoms derived from them, in a Bill of Rights which shall reflect the respect of Parliament for its constitutional authority and which shall ensure the protection of these rights and freedoms in Canada:

Therefore Her Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate and House of Commons of Canada, enacts as follows:

PART I
BILL OF RIGHTS

Recognition and declaration of rights and freedoms 
 1. It is hereby recognized and declared that in Canada there have existed and shall continue to exist without discrimination by reason of race, national origin, colour, religion or sex, the following human rights and fundamental freedoms, namely,

(a) the right of the individual to life, liberty, security of the person and enjoyment of property and the right not to be deprived thereof except by due process of law;

(b) the right of the individual to equality before the law and the protection of the law;

(c) freedom of religion;

(d) freedom of speech;

(e) freedom of assembly and association; and

(f) freedom of the press.

Construction of law 
2. Every law of Canada shall, unless it is expressly declared by an Act of the Parliament of Canada that it shall operate notwithstanding the Canadian Bill of Rights, be so construed and applied as not to abrogate, abridge or infringe or to authorize the abrogation, abridgment or infringement of any of the rights or freedoms herein recognized and declared and in particular, no law of Canada shall be construed or applied so as to

(a) authorize or effect the arbitrary detention, imprisonment or exile of any person;

(b) impose or authorize the imposition of cruel and unusual treatment or punishment;

(c) deprive a person who has been arrested or detained

(i) of the right to be informed promptly of the reason for his arrest or detention,

(ii) of the right to retain and instruct counsel without delay or

(iii) of the remedy by way of habeas corpus for the determination of the validity of his detention and for his release if the detention is not lawful;

(d) authorize a court, tribunal, commission, board or other authority to compel a person to give evidence if he is denied counsel, protection against self crimination or other constitutional safeguards;

(e) deprive a person of the right to a fair hearing in accordance with the principles of fundamental justice for the determination of his rights and obligations;

(f) deprive a person charged with a criminal offence of the right to be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law in a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, or of the right to reasonable bail without just cause; or

(g) deprive a person of the right to the assistance of an interpreter in any proceedings in which he is involved or in which he is a party or a witness, before a court, commission, board or other tribunal, if he does not understand or speak the language in which such proceedings are conducted.

Duties of Minister of Justice 
 3. (1) Subject to subsection (2), the Minister of Justice shall, in accordance with such regulations as may be prescribed by the Governor in Council, examine every regulation transmitted to the Clerk of the Privy Council for registration pursuant to the Statutory Instruments Act and every Bill introduced in or presented to the House of Commons by a Minister of the Crown, in order to ascertain whether any of the provisions thereof are inconsistent with the purposes and provisions of this Part and he shall report any such inconsistency to the House of Commons at the first convenient opportunity.

Exception
 (2) A regulation need not be examined in accordance with subsection (1) if prior to being made it was examined as a proposed regulation in accordance with section 3 of the Statutory Instruments Act to ensure that it was not inconsistent with the purposes and provisions of this Part.

1960, c. 44, s. 3; 1970-71-72, c. 38, s. 29; 1985, c. 26, s. 105; 1992, c. 1, s. 144(F).

Short title 
 4. The provisions of this Part shall be known as the Canadian Bill of Rights.

PART II

Savings 
 5. (1) Nothing in Part I shall be construed to abrogate or abridge any human right or fundamental freedom not enumerated therein that may have existed in Canada at the commencement of this Act. (such as the Magna Carta)

"Law of Canada" defined
 (2) The expression "law of Canada" in Part I means an Act of the Parliament of Canada enacted before or after the coming into force of this Act, any order, rule or regulation thereunder and any law in force in Canada or in any part of Canada at the commencement of this Act that is subject to be repealed, abolished or altered by the Parliament of Canada.

Jurisdiction of Parliament
 (3) The provisions of Part I shall be construed as extending only to matters coming within the legislative authority of the Parliament of Canada.

(end)

Constitutional Act of 1791 (Canada Act)
popular title for the Canada Act, a statute passed by the British Parliament in which the old province of Québec was divided into two provinces:.Lower and Upper Canada. The term "constitutional" was applied because the enactment established parliamentary or representative, government.

Following the passage of the act, elaborate political machinery was set up in each province. Executive and legislative councils were appointed and legislative assemblies were elected. Provision was made for creating land endowments, called clergy reserves, for the support of a Protestant clergy. This type of representative government was considered the ultimate in contemporary British colonial practice and was optimistically described as being a direct transcript of the British constitution.

In practice, however, the Constitutional Act of 1791 was a disappointment. The fundamental difficulty was the division, both economic and social, which developed within the provinces. In constitutional terms, the Canadian executive councils did not resemble the British cabinet; they remained distinct bodies without connection to the legislative assemblies. Efforts to establish connection by making the speaker of the Assembly of Lower Canada a member of the Executive Council failed and friction among the branches of the legislature became a feature of Canadian political life. 

In January 1838, as a result of the Rebellions of 1837 (series of insurrections against colonial rule by Britain), parliamentary government was suspended in Lower Canada in favor of administration by special council. Three years later, Upper and Lower Canada were joined in a legislative union under the Act of Union of 1840. However, the problem of the lack of responsibility of the executive council to the legislative assembly, which had prevailed under the Constitutional Act of 1791, remained and was not removed until 1848..Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Canada Act 1982.is an Act of Parliament passed by the British Parliament, such as was the Statute of Westminister that severed all remaining constitutional and legislative ties between the United Kingdom and Canada.
   Obviously the British Parliament at this time had long since forgotten anything about what the Statute of Westminster was about. The Canada Act was the last request of the Ottawa government to amend what came to be called a constitution for Canada. The Supreme Court of Canada ruled in the Patriation Reference (a Resolution to amend the Constitution, [1981] 1 S.C.R. 753, also known as the Patriation Reference, a historic Supreme Court of Canada reference case that occurred during negotiations for the patriation of the Constitution of Canada) that a substantial level of consent from the provinces was needed according to constitutional conventions.

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