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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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Netherlands.or.Holland.(map)
a country of northwest Europe on the North Sea. Inhabited by Germanic.tribes during Roman times, the region passed to the Franks (4th-8th century), the Holy Roman Empire (10th century), the dukes of Burgundy (14th-15th century) and then to the house of Hapsburg. The northern part of the region formed the Union of Utrecht in 1579 and achieved its independence as the United Provinces in 1648 after the Thirty Years' War. In the 17th century the country enjoyed great commercial prosperity and expanded its territories in the East and West Indies and elsewhere, although it lost this supremacy to Great Britain and France in the 18th century. The kingdom of the Netherlands, proclaimed at the Congress of Vienna (1814-1815), included Belgium until 1830. Amsterdam is the constitutional capital and the largest city; The Hague is the seat of government. Population, 14,394,600. Netherlandish.adjective

neigh.noun,.plural.neighs
the long, high-pitched sound made by a horse
neigh, neighed, neighing, neighs.intransitive verbs
to utter the characteristic sound of a horse; whinny

Johnny Von Neumann, 1903-1957
Hungarian-born American mathematician noted for his contributions to game theory and quantum theory

nostril.noun,.plural.nostrils
either of the external openings of the nose; from Middle English 'nostrille' and from Old English 'nosthyrl', 'nosu' meaning 'nose'

nose.noun,.plural.noses
the part of the human face or the forward part of the head of other vertebrates that contains the nostrils and organs of smell and forms the beginning of the respiratory tract
keep your nose to the grindstone.idiom

norepinephrine.noun,.plural.norepinephrines
also called noradrenalin; a substance, chemical name C8H11NO3, that is both a hormone and neurotransmitter, secreted by the adrenal medulla and the nerve endings of the sympathetic nervous system to cause vasoconstriction and increases in heart rate, blood pressure and the sugar level of the blood

nape.noun,.plural.napes
the back of the neck

narcolepsy.noun,.plural.narcolepsies
a disorder.characterized by sudden and uncontrollable, though.often.brief, periods of deep sleep
narcoleptic.adjective

nightgown.noun,.plural.nightgowns
a loose garment worn in bed by women and girls; also called nightdress

nudge, nudged, nudging, nudges.transitive verbs
to gently push against in order to get the attention of someone close to you; to come close to; near (the temperature in the Fall, slowly nudges downward)
nudge.noun,.plural.nudges
a gentle push
nudger.noun,.plural.nudgers

nonliteral.adjective
not literal; using figures of speech; figurative.language

Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov, born April 22, 1899, St. Petersburg, Russia. Died July 2, 1977, Montreux, Switzerland
He was a Russian born American novelist and critic and wrote in both Russian and English. He had great affection for his father. His autobiography Speak, Memory has a revised version, 1967. He wrote many novels and plays. A quote of his.

Both fluoridation and/or chlorination added to your water violate the Nuremberg Code, as do all vaccines and these because there are safe and healthy alternatives to these gross and vile practices of poisoning humanity.

Nuremberg Code.from cirp.org/library/ethics/nuremberg

The medical trial ran from October 25, 1946 to August 20, 1947. Twenty three German physicians and scientists were accused of inflicting a range of vile and lethal procedures on vulnerable populations and inmates of concentration camps between 1933 and 1945. Witnesses from hospitals and camps throughout Germany and eastern Europe were brought to Nuremberg or deposed at other sites. The accused were given both German and American lawyers. 

Permissible Medical Experiments:
The great weight of the evidence before us to effect that certain types of medical experiments on human beings, when kept within reasonably well-defined bounds, conform to the ethics of the medical profession generally. The protagonists of the practice of human experimentation justify their views on the basis that such experiments yield results for the good of society that are unprocurable by other methods or means of study. All agree, however, that certain basic principles must be observed in order to satisfy moral, ethical and legal.concepts.

   1. The voluntary consent of the human subject is absolutely essential. This means that the person involved should have legal capacity to give consent; should be so situated as to be able to exercise free power of choice, without the intervention of any element of force, fraud, deceit, duress, over-reaching or other ulterior form of constraint or coercion; and should have sufficient knowledge and comprehension of the elements of the subject matter involved, as to enable him to make an understanding and enlightened decision. This latter element requires that, before the acceptance of an affirmative decision by the experimental subject, there should be made known to him the nature, duration and purpose of the experiment; the method and means by which it is to be conducted; all inconveniences and hazards reasonably to be expected and the effects upon his health or person, which may possibly come from his participation in the experiment. The duty and responsibility for ascertaining the quality of the consent rests upon each individual who initiates, directs or engages in the experiment. It is a personal duty and responsibility which may not be delegated to another with impunity.
   2. The experiment should be such as to yield fruitful results for the good of society, unprocurable by other methods or means of study and not random and unnecessary in nature.
   3. The experiment should be so designed and based on the results of animal experimentation and a knowledge of the natural history of the disease or other problem under study, that the anticipated results will justify the performance of the experiment.
   4. The experiment should be so conducted as to avoid all unnecessary physical and mental suffering and injury.
   5. No experiment should be conducted, where there is an a priori reason to believe that death or disabling injury will occur; except, perhaps, in those experiments where the experimental physicians also serve as subjects.
   6. The degree of risk to be taken should never exceed that determined by the humanitarian importance of the problem to be solved by the experiment.
   7. Proper preparations should be made and adequate facilities provided to protect the experimental subject against even remote possibilities of injury, disability or death.
   8. The experiment should be conducted only by scientifically qualified persons. The highest degree of skill and care should be required through all stages of the experiment of those who conduct or engage in the experiment.
   9. During the course of the experiment, the human subject should be at liberty to bring the experiment to an end, if he has reached the physical or mental state, where continuation of the experiment seemed to him to be impossible.
  10. During the course of the experiment, the scientist in charge must be prepared to terminate the experiment at any stage, if he has probable cause to believe, in the exercise of the good faith, superior skill and careful judgement required of him, that a continuation of the experiment is likely to result in injury, disability or death to the experimental subject.

nonelected.adjective
someone put in a position of control without going through the elective process and who may or may not be out to do good for people within the jurisdiction in which he was placed (a bureaucrat)
nonelective.adjective
filled by appointment rather than by election, such as a nonappointive position (he was elected supervisor when the majority of his peers.vouched for his competency)
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