.
.
S i t e  S e a r c h

A_B_C_D_E_F_G_H_I_J_K_L_M_N_O_P_Q_R_S_T_U_V_W_XYZ

List of Topics__Ask Suby__Free Stuff__Questions Lists
Terms of Use__________________Privacy Policy

Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
Use the BACK button on your browser to return

crater.noun,.plural.craters
a depression.shaped like a bowl at the mouth of a volcano or geyser; a bowl-shaped depression in a surface made by an explosion or the impact of a body, such as a meteoroid; a pit; a hollow
crater, cratered, cratering, craters.verbs
transitive verb use.to make craters in
intransitive verb use.to form a crater or craters

cremate, cremated, cremating, cremates.transitive verbs
to incinerate a corpse
cremation.noun,.plural.cremations
cremator.noun,.plural.cremators
crematorium.noun,.plural.crematoriums.or.crematoria
a furnace used for the incineration of corpses

crumble, crumbled, crumbling, crumbles.verbs
transitive verb use.to break into small fragments or particles
intransitive verb use.to fall into small fragments or particles; disintegrate; decay; to give way; collapse (an ego that crumbles under pressure); the word is an alteration.influenced by the word 'crumb' and is of Middle English 'cremelen' which is from Old English 'crymelen', frequentative of 'gecrymmian', meaning to break into crumbs, which is from 'cruma', meaning 'crumb'
crumb.noun,.plural.crumbs
a very small piece broken from a baked item, such as a cookie, cake or bread; a small fragment, scrap or portion (eraser crumbs; not a crumb of kindness seemed to be in his soul) 
crumb, crumbed, crumbing, crumbs.verbs
transitive verb use.to break into very small pieces; crumble; to cover or prepare with very small pieces of bread
intransitive verb use.to break apart in very small pieces (a solid cake that won't crumb usually has organic apple sauce in it); from Middle English 'crome' and that from Old English 'cruma'

crust.noun,.plural.crusts
the hard.outer.portion.or.surface.area of bread; a hard, crisp covering or surface (snow with a firm crust); in geology, the hard outer layer of exterior portion of the Earth; the outermost solid layer of a planet or moon; the hard outer covering of some plants and animals, such as lichens and crustaceans; a scab
crust, crusted, crusting, crusts.verbs
transitive verb use.to cover with a crust; to form into a crust
intransitive verb use.to become covered with a crust; to harden into a crust; from Middle English 'cruste' and Old French 'crouste'
crustlike.adjective
having a hardened crust as a covering
crustless.adjective

crisp, crisper, crispest.adjectives
firm but easily.broken.or.crumbled; brittle (crisp potato chips); firm and fresh (crisp carrot and celery sticks); bracing; invigorating (crisp mountain air); lively; sprightly (music with a crisp rhythm); conspicuously clean or new (a crisp ten dollar bill)
crisp, crisped, crisping, crisps.intransitive and transitive verbs
to make or become crisp
crisp.noun,.plural.crisps
something crisp or easily crumbled (the roast was burned to a crisp); a dessert of fruit baked with a sweet, crumbly topping (apple crisp); a potato chip
crispy, crispier, crispiest.adjectives
crisp
crisply.adverb
crispness.noun
from Middle English 'curly' and from Old English and Latin 'crispus'

curable.adjective
being such that curing or healing is possible (curable diseases; Bruno Groening cures the incurables."There are no incurables.")
curability.or.curableness.noun
curably.adverb
curative.adjective
serving.or.tending to cure
curative.noun,.plural.curatives
something that cures; a remedy
curatively.adverb
curativeness n.
cure.noun,.plural.cures
restoration of health; recovery from disease; to be completely well; a method or course of some treatment to restore.health; a remedy; something that corrects or relieves a harmful or disturbing.situation (the cats proved to be a good cure for our mouse problem); the act or process of preserving a product (they fermented their own pickles and shredded carrots to not only preserve them but for the wonderful health and taste advantages of fermentation)
cure, cured, curing, cures.verbs
transitive verb use.to restore to health; to effect a recovery from (cured cancer); to remove or remedy something harmful or disturbing (cure an evil); to preserve meat, for example, as by salting, smoking or aging; to vulcanize rubber
intransitive verb use.to effect a cure or recovery (a curative method that worked); to be prepared, preserved or finished by a safe process (hams curing in the smokehouse)
curer.noun,.plural.curers
cureless.adjective
from Middle English and Old French 'curatif'

canebrake.noun,.plural.canebrakes
a dense.thicket of cane

cane.noun,.plural.canes
a stick used as an aid in walking or carried as an accessory; a slender, strong but often flexible.stem, as of certain.bamboos, reeds or rattans, such stems or strips of such stems used for wickerwork or baskets; a bamboo (Arundinaria gigantea) native to the southeast United States of America, having long stiff stems and often forming canebrakes; the stem of a raspberry, blackberry, certain roses or similar plants; sugar cane
caner.noun,.plural.caners

campaign.noun,.plural.campaigns
a series of actions intended to achieve a particular.result.relating to politics or business or social.improvement (a Boy Scouts fundraising campaign; an advertising campaign for a new product) campaign, campaigned, campaigning, campaigns.intransitive verbs
to engage in an endeavor planned to achieve a certain goal
campaigner.noun,.plural.campaigners
from French 'campagne' and Italian 'campagna' and Late Latin 'campania' meaning 'open country', 'campus' and 'field'

contusion.noun,.plural.contusions
an injury in which the skin is not broken; a bruise

castile soap.noun,.plural.castile soaps
a fine, hard, white, odorless soap made with olive oil and sodium hydroxide

catacomb.noun,.plural.catacombs
an underground cemetery consisting of chambers or tunnels with recesses for graves; an underground burial place; probably from French 'catacombe' and from Old French.and.Late Latin 'catacumba'

cattle.plural noun
domesticated.quadrupeds held as property or raised for specific use (bovine animals on a farm or ranch); any of various.mammals of the genus Bos, including cows, steers, bulls and oxen; date 1200-1300 A.D., language Old French 'catel' meaning 'personal property'

cavort, cavorted, cavorting, cavorts.intransitive verbs
to bound or prance about in a sprightly.manner; to have lively or boisterous fun (the children cavorted in the water, splashing and ducking each other)

celibate.noun,.plural.celibates
not married and not having sex; one who abstains from sexual intercourse for whatever reasons; singleness, bachelor, bachelorhood, chastity, maid, maiden, maidenhood, virgin
celibate.adjective
abstaining from sexual intercourse; unwed
celibacy.noun,.plural.celibacies
abstinence from sexual intercourse; unmarried
date 1800-1900 A.D. from Latin 'caelibatus' from 'caelebs', 'caelib-' meaning 'unmarried'
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
*
.