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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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interface.noun,.plural.interfaces
the way in which you see the information from a computer program on a screen or how you type information into the program (a GUI {Graphical User Interface}); the part of a computer system that connects two different machines, such as the addition of a printer; the way in which two subjects, events etc affect each other; interface between (the book deals with the interface between accountancy and law); the surface where two things touch each other
interface, interfaced, interfacing, interfaces.verbs
transitive verb use.to join by means of an interface; to serve or have the purpose as an interface for; if you interface two parts of a computer system or if they interface, you connect them
intransitive verb use.to serve as an interface or become interfaced; the point of interaction or communication between a computer and any other entity, such as a printer or human operator
interfacial.adjective

investigate, investigated, investigating, investigates.verbs
transitive verb use.to observe or inquire into in detail; examine.systematically; to try to find out the truth about or the cause of something such as a scientific problem, accident or crime
intransitive verb use.to make a detailed inquiry or systematic examination
investigable.adjective
investigatory.adjective
investigation.noun,.plural.investigations
the act or process of investigating; a detailed inquiry or systematic examination
investigational.adjective
investigative.adjective
of or relating to investigation (investigative methods); characterized by or engaged in investigation; specializing in uncovering and reporting.hidden.information (investigative journalism)
investigator.noun,.plural.investigators
one who investigates
investigatorial.adjective
date 1500-1600, from Latin 'investigare', where 'in' means 'to track' and 'vestigium' means 'footprint')

intercellular
Biology:.in biology, means to be located.among or between.cells (intercellular fluid)

immure, immured, immuring, immures.transitive verbs
to shut.something or someone in a place so that they cannot get out; to confine within or as if within walls; imprison; to build into a wall (immure a shrine); to entomb in a wall; to cage; to cloister; enclose; incarcerate; jail; shut in or up; wall up or in; from Medieval Latin 'immurare' meaning 'in' and 'murus' meaning wall'
immurement.noun,.plural.immurements

i.or.I.noun,.plural.i's.or.I's
the ninth letter of the modern English alphabet (Mississippi is a word with 4 i's)
I.pronoun,.plural.I's
used to refer to oneself as speaker or writer; the self; the ego;.do not say.'taller than I', 'younger than I', 'better than I' etc.; instead.say.'taller than me', 'younger than me', 'better than me' or 'taller than I am', 'younger than I am', 'better than I am', etc. 
Usage note
'I read the book' is corrrect; 
'Me read the book' is incorrect; 
'They told him the company bought a computer for us' is correct;
'They told he the company bought a computer for us' is incorrect; and so forth.
The sentence 'Let's keep this between you and me' is better than 'Let's keep this between you and I', although both are used.
And an example of correct natural use in colloquial speech is, 'Robert and her are going on vacation', but the nominative form should be used in formal speech and writing, 'Robert and she are going on vacation'. Oh well! It's English. See more Usage notes if you dare!

invisible.adjective
that which can't be seen; impossible to see; not visible (invisible writing; the air is invisible unless it has smog or smoke in it); not accessible to view; hidden (mountains invisible in the fog); inconspicuous ("The poor are politically invisible" ...Michael Harrington)
invisible.noun,.plural.invisibles
one that is invisible
invisibility.or.invisibleness.noun
invisibly.adverb

in-law.also.inlaw.noun,.plural.in-laws.also.inlaws
a relative by marriage; the word 'in-law' is a back-formation from such word compounds as 'mother-in-law', 'father-in-law', 'brother-in-law', etc.)

Immanuel Velikovsky, 1895-1979.
His books set out information about ancient history and catastrophic.occurrences others regarded as controversial.
He was educated in psychology and medicine, attended Edinburgh university in Scotland and Russian universities including Kharkov and Moscow. He came to understand that ancient Jew and Arab history was accurate. His first book.Worlds in Collision.was publically available by 1950. It was based on information available from histories of Middle Eastern peoples. Here he explains Venus and Mars had approached Earth closely in B.C.E. 1500, altering its rotation and axis and affecting its magnetic field. He also wrote.Ages in Chaos.in 1952, which corrects the time of events during Earth's historical beginnings..Earth in Upheaval.was released in 1955. It was about paleontological and geologic.evidence of ancient.major catastrophes on Earth..Oedipus and Akhnaton.came out in 1960. It linked Egyptian history with Greek mythology. His.Peoples of the Sea.book about ancient pharaohs came out in 1977.

intravascular.adjective
within blood vessels or a blood vessel
intravascularly.adverb

iatrogenic.adjective.(pronounced, e at tro gen ick)
induced in a patient by a physician's activity, manner or therapy (they lied in saying vaccines are safe because it caused the iatrogenic reaction called autism; is autism and other things that are providing mankind cursed hard times because we have left off God?.Leviticus 26:19-21 "And I will break the pride of your power and I will make your heaven as iron,and your earth as brass.")
iatrogenically.adverb

inebriated.adjective
someone who is inebriated has drunk too much alcohol; stupefied by or as if by alcohol; intoxicated
inebriate, inebriated, inebriating, inebriates.transitive verbs
to make drunk; intoxicate; to stupefy as if with alcohol or prescription medications (she seemed too drunk to drive)
inebriate.adjective
intoxicated
inebriate.noun,.plural.inebriates
an intoxicated person
inebriation.noun,.plural.inebriations

inquest.noun,.plural.inquests
an investigation or inquiry; you can refer to an investigation by people into causes of defeat or failure, as an inquest; a judicial inquiry into a matter, such inquiry usually held before a jury; Middle English 'enqueste', from Old French and from Latin 'inquirere' meaning 'to inquire into'

impunity.noun,.plural.impunities
exemption from punishment and detrimental effects, penalty or harm; if you say that someone does something bad or even evil with impunity, you disapprove of the fact that there is no risk to them of being punished for doing so; from 1525-1535 A.D..Middle French 'impunité' and from Latin 'impunitat-' and 'impunitas' meaning 'without punishment' or no penalty

Old Icelandic.noun
Icelandic from the middle of the 12th to the middle of the 16th century A.D.

Iceland
Iceland is an island country in the North Atlantic near the Arctic Circle. Norse settlers arrived 850-875 A.D..Christianity was introduced around 1000 A.D. In 1944 it became a sovereign state when Icelanders wanted it to be so. Reykjavík (means 'Bay of Smokes') is the capital and the largest city, with a population of 240,443. Reykjavík averages nearly 1,300 hours of bright sunshine a year. Often the Aurora Borealis is visible, especially in fall and early winter.
Icelander.noun,.plural.Icelanders
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