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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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climate.noun,.plural.climates
the meteorological.conditions, including temperature, precipitation and wind, that characteristically.prevail in a particular.region; a region of the Earth having particular meteorological conditions (she lives in a cold climate); from Middle English 'climat' from Greek 'klima' meaning 'surface of the earth', 'region'
climatic.adjective
of or relating to climate; ecology; influenced by or resulting from the prevailing climate
climatically.adverb

clitoris.noun,.plural.clitorises
a small part of a woman's outer sexual organs, where she can feel sexual pleasure, that being a small, elongated.erectile organ at the anterior part of the vulva, homologous with the penis
clitoral.adjective
date 1600-1700 A.D., from Greek 'kleitoris'

camel.noun,.plural.camels
the camel with one hump is also called dromedary; the camel with two humps is a Bactrian camel; both are large desert.ruminant animals with a long neck and either one or two humps on its back, used for carrying goods and people; date 900-1000 A.D., Middle English, from Old English & Anglo-French and from Anglo-Norman 'cameil' and from Latin 'camelus'

clout.noun,.plural.clouts
a piece of cloth, especially a baby's diaper; influence; pull; power or the authority to influence other people's decisions (the farmers groups have the clout to change to organic farming practices; people with the clout to get things done); a blow, especially with the fist
clout, clouted, clouting, clouts.transitive verbs
to hit (he clouted the baseball way out in left field); Middle English 'clut' meanng 'cloth patch'; origin for clout is 'heavy hit', date 14th century A.D.

cocktail.noun,.plural.cocktails
an appetizer, such as mixed fruit served with some juice or seafood served with a sharp sauce (fruit cocktail; shrimp cocktail) cocktail.adjective
of or relating to cocktails (a cocktail glass; a cocktail party); suitable for wear on semiformal occasions (a cocktail dress); any of various mixed alcoholic drinks consisting usually of brandy, whiskey, vodka or gin combined with fruit juices or other liquors served chilled

coextensive.adjective
having the same.limits, boundaries.or.scope
coextensively.adverb

conscript.noun,.plural.conscripts
one compulsorily.enrolled for service, such as in the armed forces; a draftee
conscript.adjective
enrolled compulsorily; drafted
conscript, conscripted, conscripting, conscripts.transitive verbs
to enroll compulsorily into service; draft; from Latin 'conscriptus', past participle of 'conscrobere' meaning 'to enroll' 
conscription.noun,.plural.conscriptions
compulsory enrollment for the armed forces; draft

conserve, conserved, conserving, conserves.verbs
transitive verb use.to protect from loss or harm; preserve; to use carefully or sparingly, avoiding waste (kept the thermostat lower to conserve energy); a jam, usually in a glass jar, made of fruits preserved by process of canning (see also 'preserve')
intransitive verb use.to economize (tried to conserve on fuel during the long winter)
conserve.noun,.plural.conserves
a jam made of fruits
conservable.adjective
conserver.noun,.plural.conservers
Middle English 'conserven' from Old French 'conserver'

contraption.noun,.plural.contraptions
a mechanical.device; a gadget

contrapuntal.adjective
Music:.of, relating.to.or.incorporating counterpoint
contrapuntally.adverb
having two or more tunes played together to form a whole

counterpoint.noun,.plural.counterpoints
Music:.a melodic.material that is added above or below an existing melody; the technique of combining two or more melodic lines in such a way that they establish a harmonic.relationship while retaining their linear.individuality; a contrasting but parallel.element, item or theme; use of contrasting elements in a work of art
counterpoint, counterpointed, counterpointing, counterpoints.transitive verbs
Music:.to write or arrange music in counterpoint; to set in contrast

corotate, corotated, corotating, corotates.intransitive verbs
to rotate in conjunction with another body
corotation.noun,.plural.corotations
corotational.adjective

coup.noun,.plural.coups
a sudden and sometimes violent attempt by citizens or the army to take control of the government
coup d'etat.noun,.plural.coup d'états.or.coups d'état
date 1700-1800 A.D., French, meaning 'hit, stroke' + 'de, meaning 'of' + 'état', meaning state

couth.adjective
marked by or possessing a high degree of sophistication; refined
couth.noun,.plural.couths
refinement; sophistication

cyst.noun,.plural.cysts
in pathology, an abnormal.membranous.sac.containing a gaseous, liquid.or.semisolid.substance; in anatomy, a sac or vesicle in the body; in biology, a small capsulelike sac that encloses.certain.organisms in their dormant or larval.stage; in botany, a thick-walled resting spore, as in certain algae or fungi; from New Latin 'cystis' from Greek 'kustis' meaning 'bladder'

catarrh.noun,.plural.catarrhs, pronounced 'cut tar'
inflammation of mucous membranes, such as the nose and throat
catarrhal.or.catarrhous.adjective
catarrhally.adverb
from Middle English 'catarre' from Old French 'catarrhe' meaning 'to flow down'

cough, coughed, coughing, coughs.verbs
intransitive verb use.to expel air from the lungs suddenly and noisily, often to keep the respiratory.passages free of material which is annoyingly.irritating (she cleared her throat by coughing); to make a noise similar to noisy expulsion of air from the lungs (the engine coughed and sputtered going up the hill)
transitive verb use.to expel by coughing (coughed up phlegm) cough.noun,.plural.coughs
the act of coughing
date 1300-1400, from an unrecorded Old English 'cohhian'

cage.noun,.plural.cages
a structure for confining birds or animals, enclosed on at least one side by a grating of wires or bars that lets in air and light; an enclosing openwork structure (placed a protective cage over the sapling; a bank teller's cage)
cage, caged, caging, cages.transitive verbs
to.put or confine in or as if in a cage; coop up; fence in; impound; restrain; shut up; corral; pen; from Middle English, from Old French, from Latin 'cavea'/'cavus' meaning 'hollow place' and 'cage'

cagey, cagier, cagiest.adjectives
wary; careful (a cagey avoidance of a definite answer); crafty; shrewd (a cagey lawyer)
cagily.adverb
caginess.noun
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