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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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Old Provençal.noun
the Provençal language, before the middle of the 16th century

price.noun,.plural.prices
the amount as of money or goods, asked for or given in exchange for something else; the cost at which something is obtained
price, priced, pricing, prices.transitive verbs
to fix or establish a price for (shoes priced at nine dollars); to find out the price of (she spent the day pricing dresses)
priceable.adjective
pricer.noun,.plural.pricers
those who set the price of something and/or put prices on what is to be sold

provenance.noun,.plural.provenances
the provenance of something is the place that it comes from or that it originally came from (the provenance of these artifacts is not known)

photoaging.noun
the cumulative.detrimental.effects on skin that result from long-term exposure to frequencies of light adversely.affecting the physical bodies of those lacking in sufficient.nutrition to maintain a proper frequency balance, especially.ultraviolet light requires restoration of any damage it may have caused; the word 'photoaging' came into use in 1986

Prussia.noun
a historical region (map) and former kingdom of north-central Europe including present-day northern Germany and Poland. Its ancient inhabitants, of Baltic stock, were conquered by the Teutonic Knights in the 13th century. West Prussia was ceded to Poland in 1466 and East Prussia became a Polish fief that passed to Brandenburg in 1618. The kingdom of Prussia was proclaimed in 1701 and was greatly expanded and fortified by Emperor Frederick II ,reigned 1740-1786. Prussia was instrumental in the unification of Germany and in 1871 its king was declared Emperor William I of Germany. The state became a republic in 1918 and was formally abolished after World War II.
Prussian.adjective
of or relating to Prussia or its Baltic or German inhabitants
Prussian.noun,.plural.Prussians
people of the Prussian republic were called Prussians

pasture.noun,.plural.pastures
grass or other vegetation eaten as food by grazing animals;  ground on which such vegetation grows, especially that which is set aside for use by domestic grazing animals; the feeding or grazing of animals
pasture, pastured, pasturing, pastures.verbs
transitive verb use.to herd animals into a pasture to graze; to provide animals with pasturage; to use land as pasture
intransitive verb use.to graze in a pasture; to put grazing animals onto pasturable land
pasturable.adjective
pasturer.noun,.plural.pasturers
pastureland.noun,.plural.pasturelands
land suitable for grazing

pavilion.noun,.plural.pavilions
a light, sometimes ornamental roofed structure in a garden or park or at fairs, used for amusement or shelter (the reception was held in a pavilion on the lawn); many city parks have a pavillion where people can get food, use washrooms and relax inside (a picnic pavilion); an arena; one of a group of related buildings forming a complex, as of a hospital; any of a number of separate or attached buildings forming a hospital or the like; the lower surface of a brilliant cut gem, slanting outward from the culet to the girdle
pavilion, pavilioned, pavilioning, pavilions.transitive verbs
to cover or furnish with or as if with a pavilion; to put in a pavilion; from 13th century Old French 'pavillon' from Latin 'papilion', 'papilio' meaning 'butterfly' and perhaps akin to Old High German 'fifaltra', butterfly

puddle.noun,.plural.puddles
a small pool of water; a small pool of a liquid (the dog made a puddle on the sidewalk)
puddle, puddled, puddling, puddles.verbs
transitive verb use.to make muddy; to work clay or sand into a thick, watertight paste
intransitive verb use.to splash or dabble in or as if in a pool of liquid; from Middle English 'podel', diminutive of Old English 'pud meaning 'ditch'
puddly.adjective

pool.noun,.plural.pools
a small body of still water; an accumulation of standing liquid; a puddle; a deep or still place in a stream; a swimming pool; an underground accumulation of petroleum or gas in porous.sedimentary rock
pool, pooled, pooling, pools.intransitive verbs
to form pools or a pool (the receding.tide pooled in hollows along the shore)

pool.noun,.plural.pools
a fund containing all the money (they all put in a bit of money and once the total pooled money was enough to buy the equipment, that's what they did); a grouping of resources for the advantage of all the participants (a pool of implements for the use of all the workers on the project; forming a pool of our talents); any of several games played on a six-pocket billiard table usually with 15 balls and a cue ball and a cue stick to strike the cue ball to get the game going); also called pocket billiards
pool, pooled, pooling, pools.verbs
transitive verb use.to put into a fund for use by all (let's pool our resources to finish the project quickly)
intransitive verb use.to join or form a pool
pooler.noun,.plural.poolers

prologue also prolog.noun,.plural.prologues also prologs
an introduction or introductory chapter, as to a book; an introductory act, event or period; an introduction or a preface, such as a poem recited to introduce a play; from Middle English 'prolog' and from Old French 'prologue' and from Latin 'prologus' and Greek 'prologos', logos meaning 'words before a speech'

profile.noun,.plural.profiles
your profile is the outline of your face as it is seen when someone is looking at you from the side; if you see someone in profile, you see them from the side; a side view of an object or a structure, such as of the human head; a form; an outline of an object; a degree of exposure to public.notice; visibility (she kept a low profile in her life by not pushing herself forward to get ahead, rather waiting to be raised up to a better position); if someone has a high profile, people notice them and what they do; if you keep a low profile, you avoid doing things that will make people notice you; a profile is also a biographical.essay.presenting the subject's most noteworthy.characteristics and achievements; a summary or analysis of data, often in the form of a graph or table, representing distinctive.features or characteristics (a psychological profile of a job applicant; a biochemical profile of blood
profile, profiled, profiling, profiles.transitive verbs
to draw or shape a profile of; to produce a profile of; to profile someone means to give an account of that person's life and character; creating a profile of someone or something is producing information on it
profiler.noun,.plural.profilers

puncture, punctured, puncturing, punctures.verbs
transitive verb use.to pierce with a pointed object; to make a hole by piercing (one of her pierced earrings caught on a branch as she slipped when climbing down the tree, tearing apart her ear); to cause to collapse by piercing (the air mattress had leaked air as it collapsed over a sharp rock from her weight); to depreciate or deflate (remarks from her that punctured my ego)
intransitive verb use.to be pierced or punctured
puncture.noun,.plural.punctures
the act or an instance of puncturing; a hole made by a sharp object, such as a hole in an automotive tire
puncturable.adjective
from Middle English 'a pricking' meaning 'to prick'
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