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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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pollen.noun
the fine, powderlike material.consisting of pollen grains that is produced by the anthers of seed plants
pollenate.also spelt.pollinate, pollenated, pollenating, pollenates.transitive verbs
to transfer pollen from an anther to the stigma of a flower
pollenation.noun,.plural.pollenations
the process of pollenating flowers
pollenator.noun,.plural.pollenators

prison.noun,.plural.prisons
a place where persons convicted or accused of crimes are confined; a penitentiary or a jail; a place or condition of confinement or forcible.restraint; a state of imprisonment or captivity
prison, prisoned, prisoning, prisons.transitive verbs
to confine in a prison; imprison
Word history:.The word prison has its origins not in the notions of what such a place is but rather in the notion of how one gets there. The word prison can be traced back to the Latin word meaning 'the action or power of making an arrest'. This in turn is derived from the verb 'prehendere' or 'prendere', which meant 'to take hold of', 'take into custody', 'arrest'. The word then dives into the obscurity of the time when Romance languages such as French were being formed and resurfaces in the Old French of the 12th century with the form prison and the senses 'capture' and 'place of imprisonment'. This new sense could have already been developed in Latin and not been recorded, but we have to wait until the 12th century to see it, the sense 'captivity' being added in the same century. From Old French as well as the Medieval Latin word priso, 'prison', derived from Old French, came our Middle English word 'prisoun', first recorded in a work written before 1121 A.D. in the sense 'imprisonment'. 'place of imprisonment' is recorded shortly afterward.

pile.noun,.plural.piles
a quantity of objects stacked or thrown together in a heap; a large accumulation or quantity (cut quite a pile of firewood);
pile, piled, piling, piles.verbs
transitive verb use.to place or lay in or as if in a pile or heap (piled books onto the table); to load something with a heap or pile (piled the bed with her clothes to pack for the trip); to heap something in abundance (piled potato salad onto the plate)
intransitive verb use.to form a heap or pile; to move in, out or forward in a disorderly mass or group (pile into a bus; pile out of a car)
pile up, piles up, piled up, piling up.phrasal verbs
to accumulate (piled up the firewood for the oncoming winter season); to undergo a serious vehicular collision (come see the pile up at the intersection at the end of the street)

pile.noun,.plural.piles
a heavy.beam of timber, concrete or steel, driven into the Earth as a foundation or support for a structure
pile, piled, piling, piles.transitive verbs
to drive piles into; to support with piles

pile driver.noun,.plural.pile drivers
a machine that drives a pile by raising a weight between guideposts and dropping it on the head of the pile' one who operates such a machine

piles.plural noun
hemorrhoids

patrimony.noun,.plural.patrimonies
someone's patrimony is the possessions that they have inherited from their father or ancestor; an inheritance from a father or other ancestor; an inheritance or a legacy; heritage; someone's patrimony is the possessions that they have inherited from their father or ancestors (I stupidly left my parents' house, relinquished my estate and my patrimony); a country's patrimony is its land, buildings and works of art (in the 1930's, The National Trust began its campaign to save Britain's patrimony of threatened country houses)
patrimonial.adjective
patrimonially.adverb

Pella.was an ancient city of Greek Macedonia. It was the capital of Macedonia from B.C.E. the fourth century. The territory was conquered by the Romans in B.C.E. 168.

preach, preached, preaching, preaches.verbs
transitive verb use.to proclaim or put forth in a sermon (preached a message to the church congregation); to advocate, to teach, urging acceptance of or compliance with (preached tolerance and peaceful coexistence); to orally deliver a sermon;
intransitive verb use.to deliver a sermon; to give religious or moral instruction
preachingly.adverb
preacher.noun,.plural.preachers
one who preaches the good news of the gospel; in Alaska, a fallen tree or log submerged in a river and creating a hazard for boats

pass, passed, passing, passes.verbs
intransitive verb use.to move on or ahead; proceed; to extend; run (the river passes through our land); to move by (the band passed and the crowd cheered); to move past another vehicle (the sports car passed us on the right, but it was a four lane highway, so it was ok); to gain passage despite.obstacles (as I look back now, I seemed to pass quickly through those early years);  to move past in time; elapse (the days passed quickly); to be transferred from one to another; circulate (the wine passed around the table); to be communicated or exchanged between persons (the office gossip passed quickly to everyone); to be transferred or conveyed to another by will or deed (the title passed to the older heir; to undergo.transition from one condition, form, quality or characteristic to another (daylight passes into darkness); movement from one place to another (some ancient.prophets.such as.Enoch and Elijah passed on but without first dying); to come to an end (the rain passed away to sunshine); to serve as a barely acceptable substitute (the spare tire was nearly bald but would pass until we bought a new one); approved or adopted (ownership passed to the lady in the front row of the auction)
transitive verb use.to go by without stopping; leave behind; to go across; go through (we passed the border into Mexico); to undergo with favorable results (she passed the school exams); to hand to (please pass the butter); to approve; adopt (the legislature passed the bill); 
pass.noun,.plural.passes
the act of passing; passage; a way, such as a narrow.gap between mountains, that affords passage around, over or through a barrier); a permit, a ticket or authorization to come and go at will (a monthly bus pass); a free ticket entitling one to transportation or admisssion (gave us two tickets to the movies); a sexual invitation or overture

come to pass.idiom
to occur
passed on.phrasal verb
to leave the existence one had on Earth; end
pass for.phrasal verb
to be accepted as or believed to be (she passed for a teenager but she was over 40; the fake painting passed for an original)
pass off.phrasal verb
to offer, sell or put into circulation an imitation as genuine; to deceive
pass out.phrasal verb
to lose consciousness; to hand out pens for writing
pass over.phrasal verb
to leave out; disregard
pass up.phrasal verb
to let go by; reject (passed up on the trip)

pantomime.noun,.plural.pantomimes
communication by means of gesture and facial expression (some tourists make themselves understood in other countries by pantomime); the telling of a story without words by means of bodily movements, gestures and facial expressions; a play, dance or other theatrical performance used in communicating with the audience and characterized by such storytelling; a player in such a performance
pantomime, pantomimed, pantomiming, pantomimes.verbs
transitive verb use.to represent or express by pantomime (pantomine a story on the stage; pantomimed a baby by cradling an imaginary infant)
intransitive verb use.to express oneself in pantomime
pantomimic.adjective
pantomimist.noun,.plural.pantomimists

prelate.noun,.plural.prelates
a higher-ranking member of the clergy
prelatic.adjective
prelacy.noun,.plural.prelacies.or.prelature.noun,.plural.prelatures
the office or station of a prelate; prelates considered as a group are often called the prelature; church government administrated by prelates

purloin, purloined, purloining, purloins.verbs
transitive verb use.to steal, often in a violation of trust; if someone purloins something, they steal it or borrow it without asking permission
intransitive verb use.to set apart or separate for the self; commit theft (Judas the thief:.John 12:4-6)
purloiner.noun,.plural.purloiners

priest.noun,.plural.priests
in many churches, a member of the second grade of clergy ranking below a bishop but above a deacon and is often one having administering the sacraments; a person who performs and administers religious.rites; Bible.history of
priest, priested, priesting, priests.transitive verbs
to ordain or admit to a priesthood
priesthood.noun,.plural.priesthoods
priesthood is the position of being a priest or the period of time during which someone is a priest (he spent the first twenty-five years of his priesthood as an academic); the priesthood is all the members of the Christian clergy, such as would be in any particular.church; the character, office or vocation of a priest; the clergy
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