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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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Benjamin Franklin.1706-1790. American public official, writer, scientist and printer. He is particularly.noted for his writings The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin (1794) and Poor Richard's Almanac (1732-1757), later known as The Way To Wealth, after which he entered politics and played a major part in the American Revolution. Franklin negotiated French support for the colonists, signed the.Treaty of Paris.(1783) and helped draft the Constitution (1787-1789). His numerous scientific and practical innovations include the lightning rod, bifocal spectacles and a stove. Two of his quotes. Although active in politics, the office of the first president in the United States of America was first held by George Washington, from 1789-1797. 

friar.noun,.plural.friars
friars were members who were a very poor group of Catholic men, traveling around in the past teaching what they understood Christianity was; word is from 1200-1300 A.D., based on Old French 'frere' meaning 'brother'
friarly.adjective
resembling a friar; relating to friars

fornication.noun,.plural.fornications
known today as.consensual sexual intercourse between humans who prefer not to dedicate to each other; the word fornication is derived from the word 'vault', meaning an 'arch', where we today say, 'Such a nice high vaulted ceiling'. The term came to refer to a vaulted cellar or similar place where prostitutes plied their trade, offering sex at a price, prostituting their body to the lust of another at a charge.in order to.acquire money. The word 'fornication' is first recorded in Middle English about 1303 A.D. In Late Latin they changed 'fornix', from which word, instead of 'vault' and 'arch', came our modern word 'fornication'. As one can see, words and their languages were mostly put together in a helter skelter.manner.

feckless.adjective
alteration of effect; lacking.purpose.or.vitality; feeble.or.ineffective; careless.and.irresponsible; from Scots 'feck' meaning 'effect' + 'less'
fecklessly.adverb
fecklessness.noun

fluoroscope.noun,.plural.fluoroscopes
a device.equipped with a fluorescent screen on which the internal structures of an optically opaque object, such as the human body, may be continuously viewed as shadowy images formed by the differential transmission of x-rays through the object. Also called roentgenoscope, named after the man who invented the measuring device for x-rays
fluoroscope, fluoroscoped, fluoroscoping, fluoroscopes.transitive verbs
to examine the interior of an object with a fluoroscope
fluoroscopic.adjective
fluoroscopically.adverb
fluoroscopy.noun,.plural.fluoroscopies
examination by means of a fluoroscope
fluoroscopist.noun,.plural.fluoroscopists

fluorescent.adjective
of.or.relating.to fluorescence; exhibiting or produced by fluorescence (fluorescent plankton; fluorescent light unhealthy when compared to full specturm lighting); glowing as if with fluorescence; vivid (bright fluorescent colors)
fluorescent.noun,.plural.fluorescents
a fluorescent lamp
fluorescence.noun
luminescence that is caused by the absorption of radiation at one wavelength followed by nearly immediate reradiation usually at a different wavelength and that ceases almost at once when the incident radiation stops also; the emission of electromagnetic radiation, especially of visible light, stimulated in a substance by the absorption of incident radiation and persisting only as long as the stimulating radiation is continued; the property of emitting such radiation; the radiation so emitted

fluoresce, fluoresced, fluorescing, fluoresces.intransitive verbs
to floresce is to show or become fluorescent, which is producing light as it is acted upon by radiant.energy; to undergo, produce or show fluorescence
fluorescer.noun,.plural.fluorescers

fallible.adjective
capable of making an error m( human beings are fallible creatures); tending or likely to be erroneous (a fallible hypothese)
fallibly.adverb
fallibility or fallibleness.noun

follow, followed, following, follows.verbs
transitive verb use.to come or go after; proceed behind; if you follow someone who is going somewhere, you move along behind them because you want to go to the same place (follow the bike path and it will take you right around the lake) to your seat; to go after (be sure to follow the good in life so that it always stays with you)
intransitive verb use.to come, move or take place after another person or thing in order or time (he guided us through paths of the forest); to grasp the meaning or reasoning of something; understand
follow.noun
the act or an instance of following
follow along.phrasal verb
to move or proceed along
follow through.phrasal verb
Sports:.to carry, say a golf stroke, to natural completion after hitting or releasing a ball or other object; to carry an intention to completion
as follows.idiom
as will be stated next
follow suit.idiom
Games:.in games, to play a card of the same suit as the one led; this is to follow suit; to do as another has done; follow an example
follower.noun,.plural.followers
one who subscribes to the teachings or methods of another; an adherent (a follower of Gandhi; a follower of Christ)
followership.noun,.plural.followerships
the act or condition of following someone; adherence; a group of followers; a following 
following.adjective
coming next in time or order (in the following chapter of the book) 
following.noun,.plural.followings
a group or gathering of admirers, adherents or disciples (a lecturer with a large following)
following.preposition
subsequent to; after (following dinner, they served a special dessert)

fain.adverb
happily; gladly; preferably; rather.("I would fain improve every opportunity to wonder and worship, as a sunflower welcomes the light."....Henry David Thoreau)
fain.adjective
ready; willing; pleased; from Old English 'fægen' meaning 'joyful', 'glad'; see also 'feign', sounds the same, but meaning is different

forewarn, forewarned, forewarning, forewarns.transitive verbs
to warn.in advance

flotsam.noun
wreckage or cargo that remains afloat after a ship has sunk; floating refuse or debris
Usage note:.in maritime law, flotsam applies to wreckage or cargo left floating on the sea after a shipwreck. Jetsam applies to cargo or equipment thrown overboard (jettisoned) from a ship in distress and either sunk or washed ashore; the common phrase flotsam and jetsam is now used loosely to describe any objects found floating or washed ashore

factory.noun,.plural.factories
a factory is a large building where machines are used to make large quantities of goods; a building or group of buildings in which goods are manufactured; a plant; a factory is also a sea going vessel in which newly caught seafood is prepared for shipment and sale )a floating fish factory)

flap.noun,.plural.flaps
a flat, usually thin piece attached at only one sidel a projecting or hanging piece usually intended to double over and protect or cover (the flap of an envelope; shoes that flapped when walking because the sole had separated from the upper part); flapping is also the act of waving or fluttering (the flap of the flag in the wind); the sound produced by this motion; a variable control surface on the trailing edge of an aircraft wing, used primarily to increase lift or drag, called an aileron; a commotion or disturbance (she was all in a flap as she saw the company coming up the walkway, because she wasn't near ready for their early arrival)
flap, flapped, flapping, flaps.verbs
transitive verb use.to wave the arms, for example, up and down; to cause to move or sway with a fluttering or waving motion
intransitive verb use.to move or sway while fixed at one edge or corner; flutter (banners flapping in the breeze); to wave arms or wings up and down; to try to fly by beating the air with the wings; to become upset or flustered
flapper.noun,.plural.flappers
a broad, flexible part, such as a flipper

flipper.noun,.plural.flippers
flippers are flat pieces of rubber that you can wear on your feet to help you swim more quickly, especially underwater; the flippers, also called fins, of an animal that lives in water, for example a seal, dolphin, whale or a penguin, are the flat limbs which it uses for swimming; a wide, flat limb, as of a seal, whale or other aquatic.mammal; a rubber covering for the foot having a flat, flexible.portion that widens as it extends.forward from the toes, used in swimming and diving
flip, flipped, flipping, flips.verbs
transitive verb use.to throw or toss with a light, brisk.motion (flipped me the ball; flipped his hair out of her eyes); to toss in the air, imparting a spin (flipping the frisbee; flip a coin); to turn over or around, especially with a light, quick motion (flip over a card; flipping the pancakes; flip a switch; flipped open her suitcase; flipped the record to play the other side); to turn through; leaf (flipped the pages of the book)
intransitive verb use.to turn over (the canoe flipped over in the rapids); to turn a somersault in the air; to move in twists and turns (fish flipping about in the net); to move quickly and lightly; snap (the lid flipped open); to leaf; browse (flipped through the catalogue)
flip.noun,.plural.flips
the act of flipping; a short, quick movement (a flip of the wrist); a somersault; a reversal; a flipflop (the banks did a flipflop on her loan)
flip, flipper, flippest.adjectives
flip one's lid.idiom
to react strongly, as with anger
flipflops.noun
a flat backless shoe or slipper
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