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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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diagonal.adjective
Mathematics:.joining two nonadjacent.vertices of a polygon; having a slanted or oblique.direction
diagonal.noun,.plural.diagonals
a diagonal line or plane; something, such as a row, course or part, that is arranged obliquely (a fabric.woven with diagonal lines)
diagonally.adverb

Diocletian.noun.(originally Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus. 245?-313? A.D., cruel.emperor of Rome (284-305) who divided the empire into east and west (286) in an attempt to rule the territory more effectively. His desire to revive the old religion of Rome to displace Christianity led to the last major persecution of Christians by the ancient Romans in 303 A.D. The horrendous.Inquisition that was yet to come, began in 1478 A.D. This bust of him is in the Capitoline Museum, Rome. Alinari/Art Resource, New York

divalent.adjective
having a valence of 2

desktop.noun,.plural.desktops
the main area on a computer where you can find the icons that represent programs and where you can do things to manage the information on the computer

ductile.adjective
easily.drawn into wire or hammered thin (ductile metals such as lead); easily molded or shaped; malleable
ductility.or.ductilibility.noun

dodge, dodged, dodging, dodges.verbs
transitive verb use.to deliberately.avoid something that indicates harm in some way; evade (dodged responsibilities and went for a bike ride, leaving the garage unkempt)
intransitive verb use.to move aside or in a given direction by shifting or twisting suddenly (the child dodged through the crowd to get to his mom; the batter dodged the ball that was heading at him and not over the batter's plate)
dodge.noun,.plural.dodges
the act of dodging

dichotomy.noun,.plural.dichotomies
division into two usually.contradictory.parts.or.opinions
Astronomy:.in astronomy, the phase of the moon, Mercury or Venus when half of the disk is illuminated
Botany: in botany, the branching.characterized by successive.forking into two approximately.equal divisions; from Greek dikhotomia, from dikhotomos, meaning divided in two
dichotomize, dichotomized, dichotomizing, dichotomizes.verbs
transitive verb use.to separate into two parts or classifications
intransitive verb use.to be or become divided into parts or branches; fork
dichotomist.noun,.plural.dichotomists
dichotomization.noun,.plural.dichotomizations
dichotomous.adjective
divided or dividing into two parts or classifications; characterized by dichotomy
dichotomously.adverb
dichotomousness.noun

dust.noun
fine, dry particles of matter; a cloud of fine, dry particles (the sunshine coming through the window showed up particles of dust dancing in the room)
dust, dusted, dusting, dusts.verbs
transitive verb use.to remove dust from by wiping, brushing or beating (dusted the furniture and the small carpet); to sprinkle with a powdery.substance (dusted the cookies with cane sugar); to apply or strew in fine particles (dusted talcum powder on my feet; in baseball, to deliver a pitch so close to the batter as to make the batter back away
intransitive verb use.to clean by removing dust; to cover itself with such particulate.matter
dust off.phrasal verb
to restore to use (dusted off last year's winter coat)

deck, decked, decking, decks.transitive verbs
to clothe with finery; adorn (we were all decked out for the party); to decorate (decked the halls and walls for the holidays); from Dutch 'dekken', meaning to cover, Middle Dutch spelling is 'decken'
decked out.adjective
clothed or adorned with finery

deck.noun,.plural.decks
a platform.extending.horizontally from one side to the other; a patio deck, being a roofless, floored area, typically with low sides, that adjoins a house; the roadway of a bridge or an elevated freeway; a pack of playing cards
deck, decked, decking, decks.transitive verbs
to furnish with or as if with a deck
on deck idiom
on hand; present; waiting to take one's turn, especially as a batter in baseball; from Middle English 'dekke', from Middle Dutch 'dec', meaning roof or covering

dioxide.noun,.plural.dioxides
a compound with two oxygen.atoms.per.molecule (carbon dioxide; chlorine dioxide)

dossier.noun,.plural.dossiers
a collection of papers giving detailed information about a particular person or subject, usually labeled on the back; from Old French 'dos', meaning 'back'

donkey.noun,.plural.donkeys
the domesticated.ass (scientific name Equus asinus); an obstinate person; if it's a donkey, how do you get a mule?

duffle bag.also spelt.duffel bag.noun,.plural.duffle bags
a large cylindrical.cloth bag of canvas or duck for carrying personal belongings
duffle.noun,.plural.duffles
a coarse heavy woolen.fabric

diabetic.adjective
a disease in which there is too much sugar in one's blood; of, relating.to.or.resulting from diabetes (diabetic patients); intended for use by a person with diabetes (diabetic cure)
diabetic.noun,.plural.diabetics
a person who has diabetes
diabetes.noun
a metabolic.disorder.marked by excessive.discharge of urine and persistent thirst; from Middle English 'diabete' which is from Medieval Latin 'diabetes' and Greek 'siphon', 'diabetes' from 'diabainein' maning 'to cross over', 'straddle', from 'dia-' and dia- + 'bainein' meaning 'to go'; diabetes is first recorded in English, in the form 'diabete' in a medical text written around 1425 A.D.

disfavor.noun
unfavorable.opinion.or.regard; disapproval; the condition of being regarded with disapproval
disfavor, disfavored, disfavoring, disfavors.transitive verbs
to view or treat with dislike or disapproval

disingenuous.adjective
not straightforward or candid; crafty
disingenuously.adverb
disingenuousness.noun

dislodge, dislodged, dislodging, dislodges.verbs
transitive verb use.to remove or force out from a position or dwelling previously occupied (she got some food stuck in her windpipe, but she knew what to do
intransitive verb use.to move or go from a dwelling or a former position
dislodgement.noun,.plural.dislodgements
also spelled dislodgment

dizzy, dizzier, dizziest.adjectives
having a whirling.sensation and a tendency to fall. See Synonyms at giddy; characterized by impulsive haste; very rapid
dizzy, dizzied, dizzying, dizzies.transitive verbs
to make dizzy (at the county fair and exhibition we road the rides just for fun that made us a little dizzy); from Middle English 'dusie' and 'disi' and from Old English 'dysig' meaning 'foolish'
dizzily.adverb
dizzyingly.adverb
dizziness.noun

decease, deceased, deceasing, deceases.intransitive verbs
to die
decease.noun
the act of dying; death
deceased.adjective
no longer living; dead
deceased.noun,.plural.is also.deceased
a dead person
from 14th century A.D..Middle English and Anglo-French 'deces' and Latin 'decessus' meaning 'departure', 'death', 'die' and 'cedere' meaning 'to go'
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