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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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grownup.also.grown-up.noun,.plural.grownups.also.grown-ups
an adult;
grow, grew, grown, growing, grows.verbs
intransitive verb use.to increase in size by a natural.process; to expand; gain; when people, animals and plants grow, they increase in size and change physically over a period of time (we stop growing at maturity; the business grew under new management); to grow is to increase in amount or degree; intensify (the suspense grew as we awaited announcement on how the change was to be handled); to be capable of growth; thrive (some plants grow in deep shade); to become attached by or as if by the process of growth (tree trunks that had grown together); to come into existence from a source; spring up (love that grew from friendship); to come to be by a gradual process or by degrees; to become (grow closer)
transitive verb use.to cause to grow; raise (grow flowers); to allow something to develop or increase by its natural process (grow a beard)
grower.noun,.plural.growers
growingly.adverb
grow into.phrasal verb
to develop so as to become (a boy grows into a man); to develop or change so as to fit (the toddler grew into his older brother's clothes)
grow out of.idiom
to develop or come into existence from (an article that grew out of a few scribbled notes; trust that grew out of long acquaintance)

Gross National Product (GNP).noun
the total market value of all the goods and services produced by a nation during a specified period

gaslighting.verb
a term used to describe a particularly.insidious.form of psychological.manipulation in which victims are systematically fed false information that makes them question what they know to be true (false information as is common for these concerns to disseminate.-.medical/pharmaceutical/chemical companies along with corrupt health departments have through lies, managed to get many of the public to believe the perfect immune system.God made them with requires poisonious vaccines to protect them from diseases)

gaslight.noun,.plural.gaslights
aa gaslight is a lamp that produces light by burning kerosene gas (not gasoline as in cars); a gas burner or lamp uses special gas

Late Greek.noun
the Greek language as used from the fourth to the ninth century A.D.

gelding.noun,.plural.geldings
a castrated animal, such as a male horse
geld, gelded or gelt, gelding, gelds.transitive verbs
to castrate a horse, for example; to deprive of strength or vigor; weaken

geld.noun,.plural.gelds
a tax paid to the crown, actually to the royals of Englnd by English landholders under Anglo Saxon and Norman kings; from Middle English 'geld' meaning 'payment'

galosh.noun,.plural.galoshes
a waterproof overshoe; galoshes are large waterproof shoes, usually made of rubber or simulated rubber, which you wear over your ordinary shoes to prevent them getting wet from snow, slush and rain

Kurt Godel.born April 28, 1906, Brünn, Austria; died January 14, 1978, Princeton, N.J., U.S.

Austrian-born mathematician, logician and philosopher who obtained what may be the most important mathematical result of the 20th century, his famous Incompleteness Theorem, which states that within any axiomatic.mathematical.system there are propositions that cannot be proved or disproved on the basis of the axioms within that system, thus, such a system cannot be simultaneously complete and consistent. This proof established Gödel as one of the greatest logicians since Aristotle and its repercussions continue to be felt today.

Godel earned his doctorate in mathematics in 1929 at the University of Vienna and soon after he joined the faculty there.

Godel's own philosophical views could not have been more different from others at the university. Thus, his contact with these others left him with the feeling that the 20th century was inimical to his ideas.

In his doctoral.thesis 'Über die Vollständigkeit des Logikkalküls' ('On the Completeness of the Calculus of Logic'), published in a slightly shortened form in 1930, Godel proved one of the most important logical results of the century, indeed, of all time, namely, the Completeness Theorem, which established that classical first-order logic or predicate calculus, is complete in the sense that all of the first-order logical truths can be proved in standard first-order proof systems.

This, however, was nothing compared with what Gödel published in 1931, namely, the Incompleteness Theorem; roughly speaking, this theorem established the result that it is impossible to use the axiomatic method to construct a mathematical theory in any branch of mathematics that entails all of the truths in that branch of mathematics.

In England, Alfred North Whitehead and Bertrand Russell had spent years on such a program, which they published as Principia Mathematica in a set of three volumes in 1910, 1912 and 1913. For instance, it is impossible to come up with an axiomatic mathematical theory that captures even all of the truths about the natural numbers (0, 1, 2, 3,). This was an extremely important negative result, as before 1931 many mathematicians were trying to do precisely that. And that was, to construct axiom systems that could be used to prove all mathematical truths. Indeed, several well-known logicians and mathematicians (e.g., Whitehead, Russell, Gottlob Frege, David Hilbert) spent significant portions of their careers on this project. Unfortunately for them, Gödel's theorem destroyed this entire axiomatic research program.

Godel became an internationally known intellectual figure. He traveled to the United States several times and lectured extensively at Princeton University in New Jersey, where he met Albert Einstein. This was the beginning of a close friendship that would last until Einstein's death in 1955.

In 1940, only months after he arrived in Princeton, Godel published another classic mathematical paper, 'Consistency of the Axiom of Choice and of the Generalized Continuum-Hypothesis with the Axioms of Set Theory' which proved that the axiom of choice and the continuum hypothesis are consistent with the standard axioms, such as the Zermelo-Fraenkel axioms of set theory. This established half of a conjecture of Godel's, namely that the continuum hypothesis could not be proven true or false in standard set theories. Godel's proof showed that it could not be proven false in those theories. In 1963 American mathematician Paul Cohen demonstrated that it could not be proven true in those theories either, vindicating Godel's conjecture.

In 1949 Gödel also made an important contribution to physics, showing that Einstein's theory of general relativity allows for the possibility of time travel.

In his later years, Gödel began writing about philosophical issues that would show that mathematical truth is objective, that is, it goes beyond mere human provability or human axiom systems.

Godel claimed that, in addition to the normal five senses, humans also possess a faculty of mathematical intuition, a faculty that enables people to grasp the nature of numbers or to see them in the mind's eye. Godel's claim was that the faculty of mathematical intuition makes it possible to acquire knowledge of nonphysical mathematical objects that exist outside of space and time.

Comprised from an article by Mark Balaguer
Additional Reading
Hao Wang, Reflections on Kurt Godel (1987), written by a close friend of Godel, provides an excellent overview of Godel's life and work, including some extremely revealing discussions of some of Godel's philosophical ideas. 
Godel's Proof, revised edition, edited by Douglas R. Hofstadter (2001), is a clear, well-written, introductory level discussion of Godel's Incompleteness Theorem and its proof. 
Palle Yourgrau's, Godel Meets Einstein: Time Travel in the Gödel Universe (1999), is a lucid introduction to Godel's contributions to the comprehension of the philosophical implications of relativity.
....entire article comprised with information from Encyclopedia Britannica.

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