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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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enthalpy.noun,.plural.enthalpies.symbol H
a thermodynamic function of a system, equivalent to the sum of the internal energy of the system plus the product of its volume multiplied by the pressure exerted on it by its surroundings; a thermodynamic accounting function, used to simplify energy calculations

enthusiasm.noun
the word comes from the Greek word enthousiasmos, which ultimately comes from the adjective entheos, 'having the god within', formed from en-, 'in', 'within' and theos, 'god' and 'great interest in the inner forces of one's nature' and today, it also means 'God active in you'; the word applies to lively or eager interest in a proposal, cause or activity; strong excitement of feeling; something inspiring zeal or fervor; a happy state.of being in
synonym.passion
enthusiastic.adjective
having or demonstrating enthusiasm
enthusiastically.adverb
enthuse, enthused, enthusing, enthuses.verbs
transitive verb use.to cause to become enthusiastic
intransitive verb use.to show or express.enthusiasm
enthusiast.noun,.plural.enthusiasts
one who is filled with enthusiasm; one who is ardently absorbed in an interest or pursuit (a baseball enthusiast)

entity.noun,.plural.entities.
anything real in itself having individual existence in reality or in the mind; the fact of existence; something that exists as a particular and discrete unit; being; a person; a ghost; the existence of something

entomology.noun
the scientific study of insects
entomologic-or-entomological.adjective
entomologically.adverb
entomologist.noun

Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1803-1882. American writer, philosopher and central figure of American transcendentalism. His poems, orations and especially his essays, such as.Nature.(1836), are regarded as landmarks in the development of American thought and literary expression. Some are 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.

Transcendentalism is a 19th century school that looked to individual intuition, rather than scientific.rationalism, as the highest source of knowledge. In.Self-Reliance.(1841), one of Emerson's most important works, he expressed his optimistic faith in the power of individual achievement and originality. He also considered the overarching need to discover and develop a relationship with nature and with God..Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

exempt, exempted, exempting, exempts.transitive verbs
to free from an obligation, a duty or a liability to which others are subject (exempting the disabled from military service)
exempt.adjective
freed from an obligation, a duty or a liability to which others are subject; excused (persons exempt from jury duty; income exempt from calculation; a beauty somehow exempt from the aging process)
exempt.noun
one who is exempted from an obligation, a duty or a liability (he's exempt)
exemptible.adjective
exemption.noun
the act or an instance of exempting; the state of being exempt; immunity; one that is exempted

entrance, entranced, entrancing, entrances.transitive verbs pronounced (en tran sing)
to carry away with delight, wonder or rapture; charming; to be in a trance (Paul the apostle.was in a trance when he meditated)
entrancement.noun
entrance.noun,.plural.entrances.plural form is pronounced (en tren sez)
the act or an instance of entering; a means or point by which to enter; permission or power to enter; admission (gained entrance to the trade technologies school); the point, as in a musical score, at which a performer is to begin; the first entry of an actor into a scene

entrench, entrenched, entrenching, entrenches.transitive and.intransitive verbs
transitive verb use.to provide with a trench; to fix firmly or securely (arguments that only entrench you more firmly in error)
intransitive verb use.to dig or occupy a trench; to encroach, infringe, or trespass
entrenchment.noun

entropy.noun,.plural.entropies
entropic.adjective
entropically.adverb
inevitable and steady deterioration of a system or society;
opposite of energy; entropy is simply, disorder or, a parameter representing the state of disorder of a system at the atomic, ionic or moleculer level.
   It is a measurement of a thermodynamic state function. 
   It can be thought of as how close a system is to equilibrium.
   It is a measure of the unavailability of a system's energy to do work.
   Entropy is also a measurement of decreasing organization occurring in a unit.
   Maximum entropy equals no power left for change. If a society can be made dumb enough.(conspicuously unintelligent; stupid), it will run out. The greater the disorder, the greater the entropy.
   Fast-moving disordered molecules of water.vapor especially have higher entropy than those of more ordered liquid water, which has greater entropy than solid water. The 2nd law of thermodynamics can be phrased in terms of entropy. 
   The quantity (how much entropy is there?) of entropy is significant because the 2nd law of thermodynamics can be phrased in terms of it; thus, the entropy of an isolated system never decreases (inevitably, things run down), but rather, increases with time; and its corollary, in a closed system (no input) undergoing change (naturally running down), entropy is a measure of the amount of energy unavailable to do work and in this closed system, the amount of energy to do work is always decreasing. 
   It's just the way the Universe is set up to function as it does. This places severe.constrains on the processes that God allows to occur; for example, a hot plate or battery in a flashlight both lose energy, if say, they are placed in a cool area; the battery losing chemically generated electrical potential. As the Gaia theory shows, the Earthis a closed habitable system for man (no new energy is being created), and is unique in the Universe we understand today. Yet the Earth is amenable to variations influenced by the solar system within which it resides; influences which maintain balance within the cosmos.
   Humans are decaying, but this is staved off nutrition and sleep, exercise, positive attitude, etc. Oceans are 'decaying'. The entire corporeal world is decaying and being renewed all the time, as much as it can, that is, when it's taken into consideration how much the greed and destruction of those of ordinary consciousness are killing it. Like our stomachs where the acids dissolve the lining, the lining is being replaced. All in perfect balance. 
   Processes that increase the thermodynamic entropy of isolated systems also increase their disorder, spreading out their energy over a larger volume or number of particles. An example is your car. Left alone, it won't wear out, but will continue decaying, turning eventually into particles of rust. Another is your body. Many foods just fill, taking away hunger, yet provide inadequate nutrition to maintain long healthful living. 
   In some cases, we have ingested poisons in small quantities hindering the body's pH balance and cellular processes. Continued use and the entire process of entropy at molecular level and even at smaller levels, increases.
   At absolute zero, where all molecular motion ceases (allegedly), order has been assumed to be complete and entropy is zero.

encroach, encroached, encroaching, encroaches.intransitive verbs
to take another's possessions or rights gradually or stealthily.(governments encroaching upon a human being's natural rights under the Creator as exemplified by the golden rule); to advance beyond proper or former limits (desert encroaching upon grassland; federal rights encroaching upon state rights; a wildfire encroaching upon the town); to take another's possessions or rights gradually or stealthily-(encroach on a neighbor's land)
encroacher.noun,.plural.encroachers
encroachment.noun,.plural.encroachments

express, expressed, expressing, expresses.transitive verbs
to set forth in words; state (he expressed words in his speech in such a way as to reach the hearts of the audience); to make known the feelings or opinions of oneself as by statement or art); to represent by a sign or a symbol; symbolize (express a fraction as a decimal); to manifest (the children expressed joy when they received free tickets to the circus)
expressly.adverb
in an express or a definite.manner; explicitly (I expressly ordered the pizza with mushrooms and jalapenos); especially; particularly (tools designed expressly for left-handed workers)

expressive.adjective
of,.relating.to.or.characterized by expression; serving to express or indicate (actions expressive of being an enthusiastic person); full of expression; significant (an expressive glance)
expressively.adverb
expressiveness.noun
expression.noun,.plural.expressions
the act of expressing, conveying or representing in words, art, music, or movement (the painting is an expression of rural values); communication of feelings (this gift to you is an expression of our feelings for what you have done in helping children worldwide)
Mathematics:.an operation or a quantity stated in symbolic form, such as x + y; the outward manifestation of a mood or a disposition (tears are an expression of joy or of grief); a facial aspect or a look that conveys a special feeling (an expression of questionability)

express.adjective
definitely and explicitly stated (their express wish was to see nature in the summertime and in the country); explicit; particular; specific (an express plan)
express.adverb

express, expressed, expressing, expresses.transitive verbs
to squeeze or press out, as juice from an orange or grape

express.noun
by express delivery or transport; a rapid, sometimes efficient system for the delivery of goods and mail; a means of transport, such as a train, that travels rapidly and makes few or no stops before its destination
express.adjective
direct, rapid (express delivery of packages; an express bus)
expressible.adjective
expresser.noun,.plural.expressers

enliven, enlivened, enlivening, enlivens.transitive verbs
to make lively or spirited; animate
enlivener.noun,.plural.enliveners
enlivenment.noun,.plural.enlivenments

extinguish, extinguished, extinguishing, extinguishes.transitive verbs
to put out a fire, for example; quench; to put an end to; destroy; abolish; in law, to settle or discharge a debt; to nullify (extinguished their title to the property)
extinguishable.adjective
extinguishment.noun

exhale, exhaled, exhaling, exhales.verbs
intransitive verb use.to breathe out; to emit air or vapor; to be given off or emitted
transitive verb use.to blow something forth or breathe something out
exhalation.noun
the act or an instance of exhaling; something, such as air or vapor, that is exhaled
exhalant.also.exhalent.adjective
functioning in exhalation
exhalant.also.exhalent.noun
an organ, such as the siphon of a clam, that is used for exhalation

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